Do i need to defrag my 2011 Macbook Air ssd?

Discussion in 'MacBook Air' started by uicandrew, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. uicandrew macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    #1
    i've installed and uninstalled a 30gb bootcamp partition 3-4 times on my stock 128gb ssd on my macbook air.

    normally, on my old macbook or imac (with a regular hard drive), i would defrag my hard drive if i used it to move or work with very large files.

    but with TRIM, i don't know if it is necessary or not
     
  2. JronMasteR macrumors 6502

    JronMasteR

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    May 4, 2011
    Location:
    Switzerland
    #2
    SSD's don't need defragmentation. Actually, it could decrease the life time of your SSD.
     
  3. ritmomundo macrumors 68000

    ritmomundo

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    Jan 12, 2011
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #3
    I think you'd have to defrag your SSD constantly for years before causing any noticeable decrease in lifespan.
     
  4. coopiklaani macrumors member

    coopiklaani

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    Aug 12, 2011
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    UK
    #4
  5. Azathoth macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 16, 2009
    #5
    The magnetic head of a traditional HDD requires an average of 8ms to move to a random part of the disk (only down from 30ms in the late 90s) - this is one of the major bottlenecks in real-life data throughput.

    Defragmenting ensures that files are on continuous sectors, minimising the head movement to once per file (ideally).

    SSDs do not have a physical read/write head, therefore de-fragmenting would not provide a noticeable increase in speed AFAIK.

    TRIM support addresses a different issue, but could roughly be considered the SSD analog to HDD defragmenting.
     
  6. mopatops macrumors regular

    mopatops

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    Jul 21, 2011
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    UK
    #6
    As far as I'm aware, files on SSDs are spread across the chips on purpose in order to increase read/write speed.
     
  7. duffyanneal macrumors 6502a

    duffyanneal

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Location:
    ATL
    #7
    The data is spread out as a form of wear leveling. That way the individual memory cells get written to evenly. Effectively, increasing the life of the individual cells and the drive.
     

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