Do you NEED a separate admin account for safety?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Jazzandmetal?, Feb 27, 2008.

  1. Jazzandmetal? macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Location:
    Virginia
    #1
    WHen I first got my mac I had an admin account, my account and my girlfriends account. A bunch of mac users at my job told me since I didn't share it with anyone that I could just use the admin account. So I deleted my separate one. Now I read a bunch of stuff saying it was a good idea in the first place. My questions are, do I need to set up a serparate account and if I do how do I get all of my Iphoto/Itunes stuff over to the new account. Thanks for any help!
     
  2. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #2
    You don't need one, but I personally have one and think it makes good sense. If nothing else it can protect you from your own stupidity/mistakes as it makes it difficult to mess up the system without having to authenticate first.

    If you want to add an admin account you don't need to move anything. Create your new admin account (ensuring it is an Administrator). You can then remove admin rights from your current account.
     
  3. Queso macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    #3
    Although remember if you take this method to change the ownership of the apps in your /Applications folder.
     
  4. Batt macrumors 65816

    Batt

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    Location:
    Syracuse, NY
    #4
    "Do you NEED a separate admin account for safety?"
    Never did it, never will. Too big a pain in the ass when I'm the only one using the thing. Plus, now with Time Machine, if you screw something in the system up, you can go back an hour and restore.
     
  5. Quint macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    #5
    What?
    It takes about 90 seconds to create a new user account.
    Whenever I set up a new machine for a client (or myself) I always make sure to add a second admin account.

    By all means, keep your regular account at admin level (It is a real pain to install some apps using a standard account) but if your primary account gets messed up in some way, it is much easier to log in as another user and fix the problem - especially if you have a password problem.

    Also, troubleshooting many issues becomes easier when you can see if they exist in a different account.
    I highly recommend creating a second admin account even if you never plan to use it.
     
  6. Jazzandmetal? thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Location:
    Virginia
    #6
    Memory

    So, I created a second admin account. I do not plan on using it that much. How much space does it take up on my cpu?
     
  7. xUKHCx Administrator emeritus

    xUKHCx

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    Location:
    The Kop
    #7
    If you are not logged in to both accounts then none.
     
  8. Quint macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    #8
    I assume you mean on your HD?
    The space should be minimal <10 MB on Tiger, probably about that on Leopard as well.
     
  9. NAG macrumors 68030

    NAG

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2003
    Location:
    /usr/local/apps/nag
    #9
    Having multiple accounts running also has minimal impact on the computer unless the accounts in the background are doing something processor intensive for some reason.
     
  10. LightMast macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2007
    #10
    It doenst take too long to setup and it's also nice to have a "clean" account for troubleshooting.
     
  11. Inconsequential macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2007
    #11
    Waste of time and space :)

    I've mucked around with OS X quite alot from 10.0 to 10.5 and its all been rock solid.

    Having a separate Windows account is something I do... because on there its so very much worth it.
     
  12. Quint macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    #12
    As a full-time Mac tech, I can assure you that Mac OS is not "rock solid". Like any other OS or any technology for that matter, problems can and very often do arise. Even if the problems are the result of user error or third party software, the ability to troubleshoot problems more easily is well worth the minute and a half and 10 megs of your time and space.
    I'm glad that you have never had any kind of problem whatsoever on your Macs, but many other people have.
     
  13. TEG macrumors 604

    TEG

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2002
    Location:
    Langley, Washington
    #13
    I did when I was first messing with 10.0, but since 10.2 I've seen no need, as it makes many things a pain. That being said, I alwasy have at least a guest account on my system, and often add another user for troubleshooting.

    TEG
     
  14. Quint macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    #14
    How does it make anything a pain? It just sits there in the background and when you need it you use it.
     
  15. seeker777 macrumors member

    seeker777

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2007
    #15
    I hesitate to get involved in this discussion due to the apparently strong and differing opinions of which many are subjective, not objective. For example, my view of what "too long to set up" equates to in time appears to be different than some others. I find it hard to believe that anyone who has actually set up another user account would find it a time consuming experience (even if they suffer from ADD).

    However, I did want to let Quint know that I support his position. For me, I would recommend that your "everyday" user account not be an admin account. This can help keep you from fragging up your system, and provide some additional security.

    OK. That's my two cents. Do what you want.

    The real question is for Jazzandmetal? - did you get the files moved that you needed?
     
  16. Jazzandmetal? thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Location:
    Virginia
    #16
    I just set up another account as the admin account. So my account is still "as is" with another admin account that will probably never get used. How will it help from fragging up my system? I am still new to mac.
     
  17. NAG macrumors 68030

    NAG

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2003
    Location:
    /usr/local/apps/nag
    #17
    You can revoke admin privileges from your current account by logging in as the new admin while logged completely out of your current account and editing your account in the account preferences pane.

    The advantage to this is that if you screw up on your everyday account it will have less impact due to the account not having admin privileges. Additionally, having a second account means that if you install something that completely messes up your user (has been known to happen) you can just log in to the second account and fix things from there (such as delete corrupt files).
     
  18. Dimwhit macrumors 68000

    Dimwhit

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    #18
    I've always used the admin account as my main account. Easier that way. And I'm comfortable not screwing things up. Honestly, I can't think of what I could possibly do to the machine by accident, short of falling for a trojan or something. But I'm pretty cautious on that end.
     
  19. NAG macrumors 68030

    NAG

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2003
    Location:
    /usr/local/apps/nag
    #19
    There was the lovely case of the quickbooks installer that nuked your desktop folder if you want a good reason to keep your admin and everyday user accounts separate.
     
  20. davidjearly macrumors 68020

    davidjearly

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    #20
    I think you need to learn to accept other forum member's opinions. Every time someone has said they don't use it, you have criticised their methodology.

    If you use it, great. By all means point out the benefits, but there's no need to get so defensive about it.

    I can see it from both sides. I don't think there is a particular need for it, but I can also see your point about it perhaps coming in useful if you seriously screw up your primary account.

    Finally, I too agree that it won't consume any extra resources having another empty admin account which is not always logged in.
     
  21. seeker777 macrumors member

    seeker777

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2007
    #21
    Jazzandmetal?
    I was not getting technical, fragging up your system merely = f#@^%! up your system. See NAG's comments.

    I take it that you are OK with your files at this time?
     
  22. fandsw macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    Location:
    Helena, AL
    #22
    I have 2 admins, as my main user account developed an issue where Adobe CS3 Updater would no longer run under my personal admin account. I have to use the 2nd one to run Adobe updater. I contacted Adobe about this issue but they were no help, blaming Leopard. Reran Permissions, didn't help. I even uninstalled and reinstalled the whole suite, but it still didn't help. So I just stuck with using the 2nd admin account just to run update on Adobe CS3.
     
  23. Jazzandmetal? thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Location:
    Virginia
    #23
    I guess...how do I tell if they are f***ed up? I don't really ever download anything. Just use the cpu for the internet (porn) and ipod stuff.:rolleyes: But the only stuff I downloaded was yahoo messenger and a widget from the apple site.
     
  24. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #24
    Just a by-the-by, you don't download stuff onto your CPU, you download stuff onto your hard drive.

    As for the original topic. From a strict security sense it is always the best practice to use the lowest level of permissions that is convenient and only to use the highest levels of access when necessary. As others have stated this is to protect you from yourself. However, since this is just a personal computer it isn't a matter of great importance and you will probably be fine not using a separate account.
     

Share This Page