Does AEBS need to be connected to a computer to work?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by brayhite, Dec 2, 2010.

  1. brayhite macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    Location:
    N. Kentucky
    #1
    I currently have one router (AEBS) distributing service to over 5 machines at times. Considering buying a new router, and was wondering if this will improve the speed of the internet (also going to upgrade to 50 MB service). I wouldn't have it connected to a computer though, rather kept in my bedroom plugged in. Is this possible or does a router have to be connected to a computer at all times to distribute wifi signal? I understand setting it up initially with a computer, but does it need at all times to work?
     
  2. TEG macrumors 604

    TEG

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2002
    Location:
    Langley, Washington
    #2
    No, Routers just need to be connected to the Internet source (modem/router/gateway).

    TEG
     
  3. dXTC macrumors 68020

    dXTC

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Up, up in my studio, studio
    #3
    The increase to 50Mbps service will be the biggest help in your case. Your router, if it's G capable, is already faster than your current Internet connection.

    Quick question, brayhite: Are all of your Wi-Fi clients (computers, iPhones, iPods, etc.) WiFi-N capable, or are some WiFi-G? If you have a mix of G and N clients, you should consider a router with simultaneous dual band, like the newest AEBS. This will prevent your G clients from slowing your N clients down to G speeds (and sometimes lower).

    Your other question was answered correctly by TEG.
     
  4. brayhite thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    Location:
    N. Kentucky
    #4
    So once I connect the router to my wifi, the range and strength will be extended and increased? And I was intending on asking for the router that Insight (my ISP) provides and put my AEBS in my room and hook the Xbox 360 directly to the router. The only non-N device I have that I'm aware of are the two Xbox 360s. Everything else (2 MBPs, one Dell, two iPhones) are N-capable (I think).

    So with a 360 hooked up, my service is being slowed to G-levels no matter what? Even if it's not using the majority of the wifi?
     
  5. dXTC macrumors 68020

    dXTC

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Up, up in my studio, studio
    #5
    Unless the 360 is connected with an Ethernet cable directly to the router, yes, it is slowing all other WiFi traffic on that router down to G speeds. This happens regardless of the amount of actual data transmitted to that G device; it's part of the 802.11 spec.

    If you get an AEBS with Simultaneous Dual Band, then you can have the 360s connecting to the AEBS and other WiFi devices, and all of them will go at their top WiFi speeds without slowing each other down. I have a N-equipped iMac and an older XP box with G connecting to my AEBS, and each maintains its highest speed.
     
  6. brayhite thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    Location:
    N. Kentucky
    #6
    I know TEG said the router has to be connected to an internet source, but can that internet source be wifi? Example being I want to put a router in my bedroom to directly connect my Apple TV and Xbox 360 to, but there's no modem or ethernet cable in there. Can it recognize the wifi and work off of that?
     
  7. dXTC macrumors 68020

    dXTC

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Up, up in my studio, studio
    #7
    Yes, it can. You'll need to set the router to bridge mode. Both the Airport Extreme and Airport Express can do this.
     
  8. brayhite thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    Location:
    N. Kentucky
    #8
    Is that a common setting for most new routers? Or a Airport-only ability?
     
  9. brayhite thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    Location:
    N. Kentucky
  10. dXTC macrumors 68020

    dXTC

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Up, up in my studio, studio
    #10
    Many routers-- not all, but many-- can be set to Network Bridge mode. Both of Apple's router offerings can do this. Many Linksys/Cisco routers and those that aren't bargain-bin models can also act as a network bridge. The chance that a particular router can do this tends to increase with its purchase price. You can always Google a particular router model to determine its ability to do this.

    Before I got my AEBS, I had a D-Link DI-524 router. It's an example of one that doesn't have "network bridge" functionality. I ended up giving it to my mother-in-law after learning that I couldn't use it in concert with my AEBS to extend my coverage into the basement.
     

Share This Page