Does anyone do CPU intensive activities on the latest MBPs?

rayriceroni00

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Nov 12, 2016
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Just started doing video encoding, and it makes the CPU fan come on probably at like 50-70%. I'll run it for hours like this doing gigs and gigs of video work.

I assume they can take it all day long, and the latest intel processors are very impressive on how fast they'll do video work. It's 3x faster than my desktop running an older i5.

Just curious of your input. Laptops suck at heat dissipation, and I can't find any issues really of overheating since the supposed mid-2018 fix.
 

1096bimu

macrumors 6502
Nov 7, 2017
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Just started doing video encoding, and it makes the CPU fan come on probably at like 50-70%. I'll run it for hours like this doing gigs and gigs of video work.

I assume they can take it all day long, and the latest intel processors are very impressive on how fast they'll do video work. It's 3x faster than my desktop running an older i5.

Just curious of your input. Laptops suck at heat dissipation, and I can't find any issues really of overheating since the supposed mid-2018 fix.
There never was an "overheating" issue, it used to hit 100 degrees, and it still does.
It's not "overheating" unless it actually shuts down from the heat, which it never does.

If I knew I'd be doing your kind of work, I wouldn't have gotten a MacBook to begin with. Not that it might break from the stress, but mostly because I can get a much faster desktop for much cheaper. Even a Mac mini is faster and cheaper.
 
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rayriceroni00

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There never was an "overheating" issue, it used to hit 100 degrees, and it still does.
It's not "overheating" unless it actually shuts down from the heat, which it never does.

If I knew I'd be doing your kind of work, I wouldn't have gotten a MacBook to begin with. Not that it might break from the stress, but mostly because I can get a much faster desktop for much cheaper. Even a Mac mini is faster and cheaper.
How does that Mac mini work out when you need to be mobile?

Also, there was an overheating issue. Intel chips step down if they get too hot. Users were experiencing decreased performance as the chips stepped down to compensate for the high temps.
 
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leman

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Oct 14, 2008
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I do intense CPU work on the latest MBP and did it with every major MBP release since 2008. It does it quite well.

Also, there was an overheating issue. Intel chips step down if they get too hot. Users were experiencing decreased performance as the chips stepped down to compensate for the high temps.
There was a bug in Apple's power management on release and Apple fixed it in under two weeks. Everything else was just overblown media reactions.
 

Painter2002

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May 9, 2017
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Austin, TX
I wouldn't worry about it. You bought the MBP do to video editing so you're actually using the hardware for something other than email/web surfing. Totally normal, use your computer as intended and unless you see your system become unstable, then don't worry about it.
I agree with this as well. These machines were designed to be used for video editing and what not. Unless OP sees something that seems the MacBook is not running correctly I wouldn’t worry too much about it.

I used to be obsessed with temps and all, but I have even recently turned off istats on my machine as it just creates anxiety. I just use it now as it was meant for, and unless it breaks, I plan on continuing to use it for whatever my needs are.
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There never was an "overheating" issue, it used to hit 100 degrees, and it still does.
It's not "overheating" unless it actually shuts down from the heat, which it never does.

If I knew I'd be doing your kind of work, I wouldn't have gotten a MacBook to begin with. Not that it might break from the stress, but mostly because I can get a much faster desktop for much cheaper. Even a Mac mini is faster and cheaper.
A desktop is a better solution, sure, but many people these days (myself included) need mobility and either can’t afford or can’t justify purchasing an already expensive laptop AND another expensive desktop. Besides this, MacBook Pros are advertised to be used for editing on, so no reason a consumer shouldnt expect to be able to use it for that.
 
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LogicalApex

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Nov 13, 2015
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Modern machines are very smart about heat. For instance, Intel chips since the early 2000s will automatically thermal throttle when they reach Tjunction (their thermal limit) to continue working, just slower, until they cool down. The same is true for most components in modern computers.

Killing a computer with heat is fairly hard now... The battery on the other hand... If they get to hot they tend to swell up.

Run it as hard as you need to. That's what it is designed to do and that's what you purchased it to do :).
 

Ploki

macrumors 68040
Jan 21, 2008
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I do intense CPU work on the latest MBP and did it with every major MBP release since 2008. It does it quite well.



There was a bug in Apple's power management on release and Apple fixed it in under two weeks. Everything else was just overblown media reactions.
yes and no.
6-cores run hotter than previous models...
and 15" 2018 run hotter than other 2018 offerings
 

lwilliams

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Nov 27, 2012
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The toughest work I do with mine is Final Cut Pro.

I just upgraded the computer. I was using a MacBook Pro 13 Retina i5 8gb 256 SSD, late 2012. It would do it, but these 2 hour videos were taking forever. But, it would do it.

So, after 6 years of flawless use, I bought the MacBook Pro 15, i7 16gb 512 SSD, two weeks ago. WOW!!!!! What a difference. But, 6 years is a LOOONG time in the tech world.

Other than FCP, I only do web, mail, text, and phone with the MB. Great machine!
 

leman

macrumors G4
Oct 14, 2008
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yes and no.
6-cores run hotter than previous models...
and 15" 2018 run hotter than other 2018 offerings
Not really my experience. Every mac laptop I worked with in the past few years ran at 100C under load. That’s what they are designed to do anyway :)
 
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Painter2002

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May 9, 2017
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Not really my experience. Every mac laptop I worked with in the past few years ran at 100C under load. That’s what they are designed to do anyway :)
I don’t have a 2018 model, but I would imagine this would be true, all MacBook Pros if pushed can hit 100 degrees, difference is the 2018 hex core 15” should be able to recoup and finish the task on hand faster than previous gen, and this not be exposed to the high temps as long as the old gen...
 

Ploki

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Jan 21, 2008
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Not really my experience. Every mac laptop I worked with in the past few years ran at 100C under load. That’s what they are designed to do anyway :)
not talking under load, talking in general.
while doing same tasks as on my old 2012, fans spun up faster, and more. AASP said it was fine.

not seeing that behaviour with mini or 13"
 

jerryk

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Nov 3, 2011
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not talking under load, talking in general.
while doing same tasks as on my old 2012, fans spun up faster, and more. AASP said it was fine.

not seeing that behaviour with mini or 13"
Interesting you mentioned this. I was just trying a 2011 13" MBP pro (16 GB, 500 GB SSD). I was shocked how often the fans spun up and made a lot of noise. Even very basic tasks like browsing this website had the fans spinning and making noise.
 

Ploki

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Jan 21, 2008
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Interesting you mentioned this. I was just trying a 2011 13" MBP pro (16 GB, 500 GB SSD). I was shocked how often the fans spun up and made a lot of noise. Even very basic tasks like browsing this website had the fans spinning and making noise.
yeah, but 2011 13" is old design and dualcore.

15" 2012 is still quadcore and newer design and it runs exceptionally well for its age.

the 13" 2018 is amazing tho, quadcore and running 0rpm under casual use.
 

PROFESS0R

macrumors regular
Jul 30, 2017
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I run iterative Stata multivariate regression models that run all of the CPUs on my MacBook Pro at 100% for up to two days at a time, with a desktop Mac Pro with 12 cores and 128 Gb of RAM running for up to a week at a time. There are no thermal issues on the MacBook Pro, fans run at maximum speed the entire time, and I have yet to experience even one error as monitored by an open console window. I would call myself a professional user, and I push this machine hard for much longer than (I suspect), the vast majority of professional users, including anyone processing video.

I could not be happier with the performance of this machine. See my signature for the specifics on my MacBook Pro.

Joe
 

1096bimu

macrumors 6502
Nov 7, 2017
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How does that Mac mini work out when you need to be mobile?

Also, there was an overheating issue. Intel chips step down if they get too hot. Users were experiencing decreased performance as the chips stepped down to compensate for the high temps.
They are not stepping down because of the heat, they are stepping up because it's not hitting 100 degrees. The thing that determines what counts as "up" is the base frequency, going from 4.2 to 3.9 is not stepping down because your base frequency is 2.9, you're still going up.