Does anyone do yoga?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by MAvery, Oct 31, 2017.

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  1. MAvery macrumors member

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    #1
  2. heehee macrumors 68020

    heehee

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    I’ve done yoga for many years and I love it. Only drawback is it’s on the expensive side.

    Some gyms have yoga classes part of the monthly membership. I have never joined a gym so I don’t know how it is compared to yoga studios.

    Try out different types of yoga, they are very different. I love hot yoga and aerial yoga, regular yoga is ok and meditation yoga is a definitely no.

    Most yoga studios have a one month try out for $40 or something, atleast here anyway. One word of caution, after you try out for a month, see if they are busy enough to be in business if you get a membership. I’ve had two studios close down after I’ve gotten a membership but I’m not going to let that get in the way of joining another one.
     
  3. ThinkDifferent24 macrumors member

    ThinkDifferent24

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    Tried it once at a gym - didn't like it because it was too hard to do but I think if I kept on doing it, it may have become easier. I prefer tai chi instead. Gentler it seems to me.
     
  4. BarracksSi Suspended

    BarracksSi

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    #4
    You never "finish" yoga. You keep "practicing".

    I didn't "get it" until I plugged in my headphones and went through Tony's P90X yoga workout for its full 90-minute duration. I decided to stop thinking about what I expected it to be and, instead, just let him talk me through it.

    I now have several videos (singles and series) of different flavors of yoga (former WWF wrestler Diamond Dallas Page has his own, believe it or not) and have dropped in on a few gym classes, too. I've been doing it sporadically for almost 8 years so far, and I still often go back to that old P90X yoga session.

    At first it's hard, but you get better -- but then you want to do a little more, so it doesn't exactly get any easier. My chair pose has gotten lower and straighter over time, for example.

    (just watched the short demo clip on the Beachbody page)

    I'm going to sound like a shill, but I'm impressed by this Vytas guy's clarity in his instructions. Tony Horton is already really good at giving cues, but Vytas sounds like he knows what he's doing (details can matter a lot, depending on the pose) and is patient enough to explain things properly.
     
  5. Zenithal macrumors G3

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  6. jeremysteele macrumors 6502

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    #6
    I was sore for a week after following that video. Well worth it though.
     
  7. LauraJean, Nov 2, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2017

    LauraJean macrumors regular

    LauraJean

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    #7
    I highly recommend Richard Hittleman's Yoga 28 Day Exercise Plan, first published in 1969, if you are a learn-at-home type. It is still reprinted and available. The book has step by step instructions and pictures for each exercise and emphasizes a progressive approach from easy, moderate, to extreme. Following the 28-day plan, the book provides three routines to rotate thru for maintaining what you have achieved.

    My first 28-day sequence was 20 years ago at age 52. Since then I have re-done the 28 day course about 6 times, the last one just a few months ago. Naturally, I have had to quit, or modify certain exercises due to aging. I have always stayed away from the head stand, and I would warn folks to be conscious of their own individual limitations and cautions, and act accordingly.

    For me, the greatest benefit of doing yoga--and a little goes a long way--is the peaceful frame of mind that comes from holding various stretches 10-20 seconds at a time. Unfortunately, the feeling doesn't last forever once regular life is resumed!
     
  8. BarracksSi Suspended

    BarracksSi

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    #8
    That's for sure.

    I took some of my coworkers to a morning yoga class at a gym once, and immediately afterwards, they said they felt pretty good. I told them to wait a few hours. Sure enough, that afternoon, a couple of them came up to me and said, "Dude, I really feel that class now... ow..."

    The standing splits sequence that Tony does (he does it again in P90X2's yoga) is killer for me. I think we spend five or six minutes on each leg. It's one of those where it doesn't get easier, but I get better (my back leg gets a little higher, my knee-to-forehead crunch gets a little tighter, etc).
     
  9. kazmac macrumors 604

    kazmac

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    #9
    I do some stretching (that is similar to some stances) and walking (with the ultimate goal to eventually take up Martial Arts.)

    So not a Yoga person, but understand the appeal.
     
  10. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #10
    Fascinating thread.

    I have always (or long) wanted to do something such as yoga, but, as someone who is not remotely supple or fit, anything that takes a physical expression that is difficult, - as in, I mean, hard, (and, above all, sore) does not remotely appeal.

    Anyone know of gentle, stress erasing forms of such activities?
     
  11. kazmac macrumors 604

    kazmac

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    #11
    I believe @ThinkDifferent24 mentioned Tai Chi. It's one of the martial arts I am considering due to it's very gentle, slow and graceful. It is a style I know I could probably handle physically to start with (given my physical issues and not being active for three months now.)
     
  12. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #12
    Thank you; now that you mention it, I do remember my mother tried Tai Chi - she took classes for a few years after she retired - and loved it. She only stopped when the instructor - who she thought was wonderful - was replaced by someone she didn't much like.
     
  13. BarracksSi Suspended

    BarracksSi

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    #13
    I think some of us — certainly myself — have jumped in at the deep end of difficult yoga. I went through a P90X session with my sister, who had been doing yoga longer than me, and she said it was way harder and faster than what she was used to.

    This guy wasn't supple or fit anymore, and yoga worked for him:
     
  14. BarracksSi Suspended

    BarracksSi

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    #14
    I was thinking about your post some more --
    I'm more sedentary now -- MUCH more -- than I was just two years ago. I went from a very active military music career (where "I'm gonna go work out" is an expected way to spend part of one's day) to a teleworking desk job.

    I think my body hurts more now than it did when I was working out six days a week.

    My back feels tweaked more often, and in weird ways, too. I can tell that my calves and hamstrings are tighter, and less flexible, than before (sitting in a chair lets those muscles shorten). It's harder to pick up heavy things like my tuba or pieces of luggage. I still have enough balance to put on my shoes without sitting down, but my new gut is starting to get in the way.

    I don't know anything of your own health history or your physical capabilities, but I'm going to strongly recommend that you get started on that long road to good physical strength. I can't tell you what to do, as everybody's tastes are different (my wife and I each prefer different styles, too), so the only important thing is to do something.

    IMNSHO, avoiding exertion is hardly going to help. My mom's been trying this non-exertion thing for ages -- she swims* because she doesn't like to feel sweaty -- and it's just not paying off one bit. I wouldn't be surprised if she becomes wheelchair-bound within five years. She would be the first of my parents' generation to do so, including both sides of my family and all of my in-laws.

    * and "swims" means "paddle gently from one end of the pool to the other", according to my sister, who's accompanied Mom on some of her pool sessions while I go to the weight room.
     
  15. arkitect macrumors 603

    arkitect

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    #15
    I practice yoga… pretty much 5 times a week.
    Highly recommended.
    :)


    A common misconception.
    You do not need to be supple or fit to practice yoga.
    That comes with time… I took it up when I turned 50 3 years ago. Typical unbendy male body…
    I can now bend and twist with the best of the 20 something year olds. :)

    The most important thing is: Breathe! Your breath is the foundation.

    It is wonderfully calming, and the practice has taken me on many wonderful inward journeys.

    Also… no one is looking at what you are doing — apart from the teacher that is. The rest of us are too busy breathing and sweating while holding a Trikonasana or doing a fierce Virabhadrasana III.

    I am looking forward to this year's Winter solstice when we do 108 Surya Namaskars (Sun Salutations).

    I would also say, join a studio. Doing it by yourself via YouTube is not the best way to get the most out of it… and also most "Gym" Yoga really is just Calisthenics.

    Yin Yoga might just be what you are looking for! Poses held for long periods of time — aided by bolsters and blocks.
    Then there is Nidra Yoga (I do this once a week). 60 minutes of lying on your back, dead still, candles and darkness… with a bodyscan.
    --- Post Merged, Nov 9, 2017 ---
    Yoga is pretty much a slow moving meditation on the breath.
    --- Post Merged, Nov 9, 2017 ---
    Spot on.
     
  16. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #16
    Two very helpful - and interesting - posts.

    As advice tendered for my life as it is, and where it is, now, @arkitect's post is probably a lot more relevant.
     
  17. BarracksSi Suspended

    BarracksSi

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    #17
    Blocks! Yeah, get those, too.

    The two equipment-related things that made the most difference for me were --

    - Doubling up on the mats. Typically-thin yoga mats are for grip, not cushioning, but when I'm supposed to put a knee on the floor, the extra cushioning lets me concentrate on my positioning instead of the hard floor.

    - Yoga blocks. Or anything, really, to bring the floor higher, like a chair or kitchen stool. I still can't rightly do a half-moon pose unless I have a block to support my lower hand; otherwise, either I have to bend my standing knee (which sucks) or give up on reaching the floor with my fingers (which turns the pose into... I dunno, "twisting Warrior Three" or something).
    --- Post Merged, Nov 9, 2017 ---
    arkitect is only seven years ahead of me :D
     
  18. BarracksSi Suspended

    BarracksSi

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    #18
    Revisiting this thread, and specifically this earlier post of mine --
    So my mom had her first knee replacement surgery just over two weeks ago. She'll probably need her other knee and one hip done sometime soon, too.

    The one thing that's made her recovery less than a month long (maybe; she's still not back at the house) is the fact that mom n' dad's house has a lot of stairs. The bedroom and bathroom are upstairs, then there's the main level with kitchen etc, then the laundry and shower are in the basement. If it weren't for all those stairs, she'd have a lot less leg strength than she does now.

    Like I said earlier, though, her now-habitual lack of exertion, especially after years of avoiding load-bearing exercise, is coming back to bite her. Also, if it wasn't for her physical therapist being so adamant about regaining her knee's range of motion, she'd probably end up letting her leg heal in a rigid, straight line since she would rather avoid any discomfort.

    I think the four things that used to get her moving in the last decade were visiting her granddaughter, walking the dog, playing in music groups, and going to the YMCA. Now that the granddaughter has moved away and the dog has passed, she's got a lot of time to sit at home and dink around on the computer. Whatever gains she made after fixing her diet (got diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes) seem to be going away.

    The good thing, potentially, is, based on comments from all her friends who also had knee replacements, she'll soon be walking easier than she had been in a long time. But, man, the recovery is taking a lot longer than anyone expected.
     
  19. Gutwrench Contributor

    Gutwrench

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    #19
    +1

    I think it’s hard as hell too!
     

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18 October 31, 2017