Does it seem like Apple is upgrading hardware too often?

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by BrokenChairs, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. BrokenChairs macrumors member

    BrokenChairs

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Location:
    Australia
    #1
    I know this may be silly, but lately I feel like there is this big push by Apple to upgrade everything almost immediately. Now I know that is an exaggeration, but the iPhone 4 here in Australia hasn't been out for too long and now there is talk of the iPhone 5. The iPad too hasn't had too much time here, but now there are rumours of iPad 2.

    To me, it feels like years ago when Apple had less products, Apple didn't need to upgrade as much, holding off for a while. I know that I can go and research the upgrades thanks to the buyersguide section of MacRumors, but I'm curious to know whether anyone else feels the same way? I had always thought the PC machines upgraded and changed more than Apple and now I get this feeling that Apple is getting worse.

    Mind you, I'm not a Mac junkie like I used to be. I only own an iMac these days. Still cannot justify buying anything else bar an iPod.
     
  2. RichardBeer macrumors regular

    RichardBeer

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2009
    Location:
    England
    #2
    The very definition of 'upgrades' is an improvement. Improvement is proof of progress both which are positive and is one of the main points of selling products within a market. Improving the items to gain more profits and supplying items of value to the user who buys at their discretion. To imply that Apple are getting 'worse' indicates that upgrading and going forward is a bad thing.

    What pills are you on?
     
  3. Grolubao macrumors 65816

    Grolubao

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2008
    Location:
    London, UK
    #3
    It's not Apple, is the market who is pushing this. All the other companies are after Apple, and they need to keep up.
     
  4. Eric5h5 macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2004
    #4
    Er, no. Actually they could stand to upgrade more frequently. That doesn't mean you need to buy every single upgrade, you know. And yes, glancing at the buyer's guide for a few seconds would have told you that your impression is not accurate at all.

    --Eric
     
  5. *LTD* macrumors G4

    *LTD*

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    #5
    Now they're upgrading too often??

    First they're criticized for not upgrading enough . . . now they're doing it too often?

    We're spoiled by Apple. Plain and simple. Funny thing is, if the company were run by some of the towering intellects on this site who think they know better than the minds behind the turn-around a decade ago and the creators of the iPad, the company would have been bankrupt years ago and probably in the rubber dogs**t business.

    If you're this apt to criticize Apple, I'd shudder to think what your opinion is of the competition - also-rans like MS, Acer, Dell, etc.
     
  6. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

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    Aug 24, 2009
    Location:
    UK
    #6
    I agree with this part of your statement. The rest is just total nonsense.
     
  7. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #7
    The iPhone gets upgraded roughly once a year. That's not often at all.

    Yes, Apple just upgraded the MacBook Pros. Next time around it's likely to be iMacs.

    It might seem like they're upgrading something all the time, but it isn't always the same product line. I don't think there's anything unusual about their product cycles at all.
     
  8. Stella macrumors 604

    Stella

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2003
    Location:
    Canada
    #8
    Apple upgrade their hardware less than other manufacturers.. so, No, they don't.

    Next you'll complain that Apple's hardware isn't using the latest technology compared to the competition!
     
  9. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #9
    As Apple has moved into the mobile market the product cycles have changed. Consumers see portable electronic devices as somewhat temporary and expendable as opposed to larger and more expensive products like computers and servers. For example, how many cell phones has the average person owned in their mobile phone life. I've been a cell customer for about 11 years and I'm on my 5th cell phone and that's because I kept one for almost 6 years. People update their iPods, iPhones, and soon also their iPads on a more regular cycle. Some update at every refresh.

    The computer line of products is on a slower cycle with incremental bumps more frequent and complete product redesigns still happening every few years or longer. Other products simply upgrade as technology allows it. Take the Airport as an example as tech changed from G to N so has the product. As we've moved to wireless NAS the Time Capsule came about and now it is refreshed as hard drive sizes increase.

    Advancement is a contstant forward movement. I think it just seems like the upgrades are coming faster as Apple has expanded it's product line and entered new markets.
     
  10. Pink∆Floyd macrumors 68020

    Pink∆Floyd

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Location:
    Up There
    #10
    No, you just have to be aware about when Apple is getting ready to upgrade hardware, get familiar with the cycles.
     
  11. OSMac macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2010
    #11
    Judging by the lineups and rumor sites, Apple's customers love upgrades
    have no problem selling lasts years device for the new one :)

    Does Apple take advantage of that?
    iPad - only 256MB of ram ...
    Current Air - 3 year old processors

    I don't know but part of the Apple experience is looking forward to updates.
     
  12. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    Location:
    Canada, eh?
    #12
    Apple is THE slowest company when it comes to product updates and refreshes.

    If it were some other company releasing a computer or cell phone or some other product, you'd see continuous variations on model numbers, almost to dizzying points. You'd have, for example, the MacBook 8000 series. Followed a few months later by the model 8100, the 8200, the 8210, the 8210T (with Thunderbolt), ...

    Apple, on the other hand, releases products so infrequently that you can refer to them by year. The 2011 series MacBook Pros. I have one from 2007.

    (Yeah, Apple used to release dizzying arrays of products too. This was before they greatly simplified their model line-up -- at the behest of Steve Jobs, of course. I don't think people would mind if the pendulum swung back the other way a little bit, though...)
     

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