Does Lion have a preferred hard drive format type?

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Lion (10.7)' started by osxhero, Nov 28, 2011.

  1. osxhero macrumors member

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  2. SandboxGeneral Moderator

    SandboxGeneral

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    #2
    Mac OS Extended (Journaled).

    No it didn't change from SL.
     
  3. QuarterSwede macrumors G3

    QuarterSwede

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    #3
    HSF+ Journaled Case-Sensitive like Snow Leopard. ... Apple really needs a modern filesystem.
     
  4. osxhero thread starter macrumors member

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  5. jayhawk11 macrumors 6502a

    jayhawk11

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    #5
    Only iOS is case sensitive. OS X is HFS+ (Journaled), also known as Mac OS Extended (Journaled), with a GUID partition table.
     
  6. Riemann Zeta macrumors 6502a

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    #6
    I actually think the non-case sensitive HFS+ is the preferred file system. I've never used the case-sensitive version for a primary (i.e. bootable) Mac OS partition.
     
  7. Fishrrman macrumors G3

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    #7
    One other thing worth mentioning is that Lion absolutely requires that journaling be turned on.

    When I first tried installing Lion onto a drive with journaling DISabled, Lion wouldn't even "see" the drive in question until I turned journaling back on.
     
  8. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    #8
    I am curious about your reasons for wanting to disable journaling. It is such a no-brainer to me to ensure data integrity on my HDD. What are your reasons for wanting to turn it off?
     
  9. Fishrrman macrumors G3

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    #9
    "I am curious about your reasons for wanting to disable journaling. It is such a no-brainer to me to ensure data integrity on my HDD. What are your reasons for wanting to turn it off?"

    I don't like the idea of invisible data files being created on my drives. For this same reason, I have _NEVER_ used Spotlight -- I either completely disable it or make sure that EVERY volume I have is designated "privacy" so that Spotlight will not "index" it.

    I just don't like things like this going on automatically. Perhaps this is because my computing experience goes back to the old days when OS's were installed on 800k floppies and free space was at a premium. It was up to the user to control and manage what went on the disk. No other logical reason to give you.
     
  10. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    #10
    Earth to Fishrrman, it is not 1989 anymore. One of the purposes of a computer is to ensure the integrity of your data. Many users spend money to utilities to ensure that they can recover data from inadvertent erasures. Journaling can't protect you from hardware failure. It also won't protect you from deliberate erasures or hardware failures, but it does virtually eliminate the need for what little routine maintenance that prudence dictated before Apple adopted the technique for HFS+. This means that the money spent on such utilities can be put to better use.

    I won't even you into the fact that hard drive capacity is simply no longer at a premium. Even without journaling, HFS+ was a substantial improvement in storage efficiency over the HFS that you are so fond of.
     
  11. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #11
    Then you'd better reformat your drive and not install any operating system on it, because every OS creates data files that aren't visible to the user, unless they deliberately take steps to see them.
    All that accomplishes is making searching for files more time consuming and less accurate. That's like throwing away the card catalog in a library and choosing instead to go shelf-by-shelf and row-by-row searching for every book. Not the brightest move.
    Again, remove all operating system software, because all OS software has "things going on automatically" that you know nothing about.
    Applying the "old days" methods to today's computing environment is senseless. Did you rip out your car's starter and install a crank in the front of it, as well?
    Exactly. You'll be better served by spending a little time getting to know how today's computers work.... the basics, at least... so you won't be crippling your computer's capability and efficiency because of some outdated, baseless, illogical phobia.
     
  12. Fishrrman macrumors G3

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    #12
    "Exactly. You'll be better served by spending a little time getting to know how today's computers work.... the basics, at least... so you won't be crippling your computer's capability and efficiency because of some outdated, baseless, illogical phobia."

    My computers work just fine, thank you very much.

    I ran my PowerMac g4 for almost 6 years on its ORIGINAL SOFTWARE INSTALLATION (10.3.2 followed by incremental updates to 10.3.9). Never once "reinstalled" the software, and although I'm using 10.4.11 on it now (typing on it here), my 2004-vintage installation of 10.3.9 will still boot up and run just fine.

    Going on eight years of constant usage, the old g4 still runs smoothly and surprisingly fast vis-a-vis my 07 iMac and 2010 MacBook Pro.

    There are valid reasons for disabling "in the background" data logging apps such as Spotlight. I use my (2007) Intel iMac for audio recording, and don't want anything interfering with the flow of incoming audio data while recording. I wouldn't be surprised if there are others who use their Macs for audio/video content creation who do the same.
     
  13. Steve's Barber macrumors 6502a

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    #13
    And for each one of those there's a thousand who just use their macs and go about their business of creating audio/video content without worrying about it. :)
     
  14. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #14
    That's not a valid reason. When Spotlight initially indexes a drive, performance may be impacted. If you simply let that process complete, the ongoing maintenance of that index is imperceptible to any active process. There is no way that Spotlight maintaining a drive index will interfere with any app or data flow you have running. Disabling Spotlight from indexing is even less useful for your needs than holding your left arm in the air while recording.
     

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