Does the OWC SSD for the Retina Void the Warranty

Erasmus

macrumors 68030
Jun 22, 2006
2,654
165
Hiding from Omnius in Australia
Does the user's manual that came with the computer give instructions on how to change the SSD? I'm guessing not.

In theory, I think it does. In practice, I'm sure it doesn't. Just don't damage the machine when you upgrade it, and keep the stock SSD in case you need to swap it back if you need to use Applecare.

If you have a problem with your computer, and you send it in for warranty repairs with the new SSD, I suspect they might ask you to return it to factory conditions before fixing it, depending on if the new SSD is a possible cause of the problem. I highly doubt they would cancel your warranty.
 

Cameraman12

macrumors member
Mar 14, 2009
37
3
Cali
From the research Ive done it would not void it. Its no different if you buy a new car and put different brakes on it or different exhaust. The warranty would still be good unless you damage it during installation, then all bets are off. Apparently, there's even a law in most states that protects consumers in cases like this.

Just keep the old ssd and re-install it just in case you need to send it in just to be sure.
 

reRESERVEDMD

macrumors member
Jun 27, 2012
71
0
The warranty would be void as a rMBP is considered to be non upgradeable computer and there's nothing in the manual that shows you how to replace RAM or HDD etc.

For example, cMBP has few pages in the manual talking about drive and RAM replacement.

However, if you retain your original drive and put it back in whenever you go for service, I doubt they will tell at all.
 

procrastinasn

macrumors regular
Jun 20, 2010
106
280
Does the user's manual that came with the computer give instructions on how to change the SSD? I'm guessing not.

In theory, I think it does. In practice, I'm sure it doesn't. Just don't damage the machine when you upgrade it, and keep the stock SSD in case you need to swap it back if you need to use Applecare.

If you have a problem with your computer, and you send it in for warranty repairs with the new SSD, I suspect they might ask you to return it to factory conditions before fixing it, depending on if the new SSD is a possible cause of the problem. I highly doubt they would cancel your warranty.

I would agree with this. Just keep the old one in case you need to bring it in.
 

alphaod

macrumors Core
Feb 9, 2008
22,176
1,228
NYC
Since the OP has pretty been answered, I would like to pose a question of my own: Why spend $580 on an upgrade SSD when you can spend the same amount to get an as good if not better SSD from Apple, plus a faster processor?

Should you consider that you will end up with spare SSD, I would wonder what could need a proprietary SSD?
 

teqnic2009

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 14, 2012
16
0
Re

I asked because I need to keep this purchase under a certain amount. These are the options:

15" 2.7, 16 gb memory, 750 gig, high res antiglare = $2,483 (memory upgrade from OWC)
Retina 2.7, 16 gb, 256 = $2,504
2.3 retina with 16gb, 512 = $2,679 (or add 2.6)

Prices are through Apple EDU

I figured I could get the 2.7 retina and later upgrade the ssd.
 

Cameraman12

macrumors member
Mar 14, 2009
37
3
Cali
If it were me I would go for option #2. Thats sort of what I did and the $500 I saved on upgrading to the 500 Gb drive in the Retina, I bought a 3TB external Thunderbolt and 3Tb USB 3.0 drive (total was $506.) Both of which are getting read and write just under 200 mb/s and are small enough to carry in my laptop bag.

6TB vs. 256gb for the same price :)
 

teqnic2009

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 14, 2012
16
0
I figured the 2.7 would be good because I used Photoshop and Premiere CS6 primarily.

Camerman - which manufacturer did you go with for Thunderbolt storage?
 

snaky69

macrumors 603
Mar 14, 2008
5,904
484
I figured the 2.7 would be good because I used Photoshop and Premiere CS6 primarily.

Camerman - which manufacturer did you go with for Thunderbolt storage?
You'd be hard pressed to feel a difference between the 2.7 and 2.6, trust us. Very few people could actually make use and notice the difference between the two.
 

Cameraman12

macrumors member
Mar 14, 2009
37
3
Cali
I figured the 2.7 would be good because I used Photoshop and Premiere CS6 primarily.

Camerman - which manufacturer did you go with for Thunderbolt storage?
I bought the Seagate 3TB Goflex Thunderbolt drive for Mac. It was marked down to $338 at BB a few days ago. I also bought the Seagate 3Tb Backup Plus Drive for $158 for Mac and got the USB 3.0 adapter for $9.99. Both work great and are very fast! I use the Backup Plus Drive as my Time Machine drive and the thunderbolt as mainly a photo drive with a small partition for other misc. stuff. The internal ssd drive in the retina just holds my apps, and personal iPhoto/itunes library. 256Gb was more than enough for that for me.
 
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