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tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,897
I know that a lot of people on this forum are afraid of opening their own iMac, usually because removing the display seems intimidating.

As someone who has done this dozens upon dozens of times, I can say that your fear is unfounded.

The display is held on by double sided tape and all your are doing is cutting the tape.

The two steps that are prone to accidents are: connecting/disconnecting the display connectors.

In this stage, you would be holding the display with one hand while connecting/disconnecting the connectors with the other.

Sometimes, either your hand slipped or you get distracted: a costly mistake.

If you get a second person to hold the display using a pair of heavy duty suction cups while you work on the connectors, you virtually eliminated any chance of accident.
 
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MadDane

macrumors 6502a
Apr 5, 2015
601
228
I have opened up a 2012 iMac (as well as older iMacs). Another thing to be aware of, and one I never see mentioned, is the risk of leaving fingerprints permanently on the screen. I accidentally did that and you can still see it three years later.

So people - it is doable but be careful and take your time. And try not to put too much pressure on the back side of the screen.

Oh, and I performed the "surgery" after the warranty had expired. The hard drive portion of the Fusion Drive had died so I replaced it with an SSD.
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,897
I have opened up a 2012 iMac (as well as older iMacs). Another thing to be aware of, and one I never see mentioned, is the risk of leaving fingerprints permanently on the screen. I accidentally did that and you can still see it three years later.

So people - it is doable but be careful and take your time. And try not to put too much pressure on the back side of the screen.

Oh, and I performed the "surgery" after the warranty had expired. The hard drive portion of the Fusion Drive had died so I replaced it with an SSD.

I think that only applies to older iMac that doesn't have the glass fused to the display.
 

MadDane

macrumors 6502a
Apr 5, 2015
601
228
I think that only applies to older iMac that doesn't have the glass fused to the display.
That specifically happened on the late 2012 iMac with the fused glass. I have also opened my late 2009 (with magnets) several times. Nothing bad/unfortunate never happened with that one.
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,897
That specifically happened on the late 2012 iMac with the fused glass. I have also opened my late 2009 (with magnets) several times. Nothing bad/unfortunate never happened with that one.


Hm. I haven't encountered this issue, but I use a pair of heavy duty suction cups to handle the display.
 

psapp

macrumors newbie
Jun 7, 2018
19
4
I plan on doing this with a memory upgrade kit from ifixit or owc, maybe I'll replace the HDD with an SSD while I'm at it.
 

redheeler

macrumors G3
Oct 17, 2014
8,465
8,921
Colorado, USA
I know that a lot of people on this forum are afraid of opening their own iMac, usually because removing the display seems intimidating.
For me it's not taking it off that seems intimidating. It's putting it back on. :)

Regardless, this is not something I will attempt on my primary iMac, at least while it's still under warranty. I have others that I opened to install an SSD, but those are 2011 and earlier models.
 

flyinmac

macrumors 68040
Sep 2, 2006
3,579
2,465
United States
This thread would be even better if OP offered a warranty with his advice!

There is always a risk with advice. The giver can technically be found liable if encouragement was given.

Stating how you did something and the steps with a disclaimer of I’m not telling you to do this, is a safer route.

But... a smart person should reasonably assume that they are undertake a task.
 

Cruciarius

macrumors regular
Aug 18, 2013
109
17
Massachusetts
I'm tempted to open up my late 2014 iMac, due to major overheating issues. Although I'm assuming it's just a heat sync issue and needs to be reapplied. Something I've never done, but back when it was under warranty, it was done to fix this exact over heating issue.

Would dive into opening my iMac, if I had the funds to buy a new one, if something bad were to happen.
 

sracer

macrumors G4
Apr 9, 2010
10,342
13,141
where hip is spoken
There is always a risk with advice. The giver can technically be found liable if encouragement was given.

Stating how you did something and the steps with a disclaimer of I’m not telling you to do this, is a safer route.

But... a smart person should reasonably assume that they are undertake a task.
I think that part of the resistance is due to the OP's dismissal of people's concerns. This is what he said:

As someone who has done this dozens upon dozens of times, I can say that your fear is unfounded.
Concern of damaging the iMac is NOT unfounded. Apple didn't design the iMac to be opened by customers. That alone introduces valid reason reason to be concerned.
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,897
This thread would be even better if OP offered a warranty with his advice!

I do offer warranty.

If I replaced the hard drive in your iMac with the SSD and the SSD failed, I will replace the SSD for free so as long as the SSD is in warranty.
[doublepost=1529705622][/doublepost]
For me it's not taking it off that seems intimidating. It's putting it back on. :)

Regardless, this is not something I will attempt on my primary iMac, at least while it's still under warranty. I have others that I opened to install an SSD, but those are 2011 and earlier models.

It's easy if you know how to do it.

If you tape the bottom of the display in place (temporary), it will act as a hinge to prevent the display from dropping while you reconnect the connectors.
[doublepost=1529706112][/doublepost]
There is always a risk with advice. The giver can technically be found liable if encouragement was given.

Stating how you did something and the steps with a disclaimer of I’m not telling you to do this, is a safer route.

But... a smart person should reasonably assume that they are undertake a task.

That's a risk associated with anything.

You can replace the break pads in your car then get into an accident because you didn't reinstall the break pads properly.
[doublepost=1529706564][/doublepost]
I'm tempted to open up my late 2014 iMac, due to major overheating issues. Although I'm assuming it's just a heat sync issue and needs to be reapplied. Something I've never done, but back when it was under warranty, it was done to fix this exact over heating issue.

Would dive into opening my iMac, if I had the funds to buy a new one, if something bad were to happen.

The whole procedure is not too difficult.

https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/iMac+Intel+27-Inch+Retina+5K+Display+Heat+Sink+Replacement/30523

Just be super careful around the power supply because it can give you a big jolt.
[doublepost=1529707225][/doublepost]
I think that part of the resistance is due to the OP's dismissal of people's concerns. This is what he said:


Concern of damaging the iMac is NOT unfounded. Apple didn't design the iMac to be opened by customers. That alone introduces valid reason reason to be concerned.

Well, of cause not.

Most things aren't design to be opened by customers.
 
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rjsounds

macrumors member
Jul 3, 2017
73
28
I feel the OP should have some sort of disclaimer or "open at your own risk" when encouraging people to open up their iMac. I appreciate the advice, and I'm sure others do as well, but for things as expensive as the iMac, especially knowing that some Apple stores can refuse repairs if they find out the user opened up the Mac, I wouldn't go around promoting this sort of thing without mentioning the risks involved. You may end up costing people more money than they would have saved.
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,897
I feel the OP should have some sort of disclaimer or "open at your own risk" when encouraging people to open up their iMac. I appreciate the advice, and I'm sure others do as well, but for things as expensive as the iMac, especially knowing that some Apple stores can refuse repairs if they find out the user opened up the Mac, I wouldn't go around promoting this sort of thing without mentioning the risks involved. You may end up costing people more money than they would have saved.

It's relatively low risk.

Replacing the break pads in your car is riskier.
[doublepost=1529707800][/doublepost]
I don't know what "most things" have to do with this particular issue. You claimed that their fear is unfounded. I disagree with your opinion.

The display is designed to be removable.

I even have a service manual from Apple somewhere that has instruction on how to remove the display.
 

rjsounds

macrumors member
Jul 3, 2017
73
28
Fair enough. But I feel it's still worth mentioning the risks considering many Apple product owners likely have never opened up their devices before.

Off topic:

Well, of cause not.

It's of "course," not cause. I've seen you respond with this a number of times, so I am merely politely offering the correct phrase.
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,897
Fair enough. But I feel it's still worth mentioning the risks considering many Apple product owners likely have never opened up their devices before.

What am I to say?

"Be careful. The display is heavy and made of glass so it may shatter upon impact" ?

Off topic:

It's of "course," not cause. I've seen you respond with this a number of times, so I am merely politely offering the correct phrase.

Thanks. I am not exactly good at grammar.

It comes back to bite me when I am writing term papers.
 
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HDFan

Contributor
Jun 30, 2007
6,762
2,971
I can say that your fear is unfounded.

Maybe so, but if one isn't a great fixit guy and something happens, Apple may refuse to repair it:

https://www.macrumors.com/2018/04/18/linus-tech-tips-imac-pro-repair-video/

even if the unit is till under warranty:

"Apple's limited one-year warranty is also void if a product has "damage caused by service, including upgrades and expansions, performed by anyone who is not a representative of Apple or an Apple Authorized Service Provider."

or even out of warranty:

"MacRumors contacted a reliable source who confirmed that Apple Authorized Service Providers are permitted to deny service for any product that has been opened or modified by a customer, regardless of warranty, both for safety reasons and to avoid responsibility if the machine cannot be fixed."

 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,897
Maybe so, but if one isn't a great fixit guy and something happens, Apple may refuse to repair it:

https://www.macrumors.com/2018/04/18/linus-tech-tips-imac-pro-repair-video/

even if the unit is till under warranty:

"Apple's limited one-year warranty is also void if a product has "damage caused by service, including upgrades and expansions, performed by anyone who is not a representative of Apple or an Apple Authorized Service Provider."

or even out of warranty:

"MacRumors contacted a reliable source who confirmed that Apple Authorized Service Providers are permitted to deny service for any product that has been opened or modified by a customer, regardless of warranty, both for safety reasons and to avoid responsibility if the machine cannot be fixed."

1. If you break it, you pay for it: it's common sense.

2. If you actually watched the video, you know he couldn't get his computer fixed because Apple can't get the parts.

3. Apple cannot void the warranty simply because you opened your iMac. (If you broke it, that's a different story.)

From the FTC:

The letters warn that FTC staff has concerns about the companies’ statements that consumers must use specified parts or service providers to keep their warranties intact. Unless warrantors provide the parts or services for free or receive a waiver from the FTC, such statements generally are prohibited by the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, a law that governs consumer product warranties. Similarly, such statements may be deceptive under the FTC Act.

Each company used different language, but here are examples of questionable provisions:

  • The use of [company name] parts is required to keep your . . . manufacturer’s warranties and any extended warranties intact.
  • This warranty shall not apply if this product . . . is used with products not sold or licensed by [company name].
  • This warranty does not apply if this product . . . has had the warranty seal on the [product] altered, defaced, or removed.
“Provisions that tie warranty coverage to the use of particular products or services harm both consumers who pay more for them as well as the small businesses who offer competing products and services,” said Thomas B. Pahl, Acting Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection.

From MacSales/OWC:

Unfortunately though, there exists a misconception among some users and even technicians that opening the machine voids the warranty.

We address this topic directly with customers via our support portals and are happy to inform you here of the same fact: upgrading your Mac does not void its warranty.

This consumer protection is owed to the little known Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of 1975. Put simply, the act states that a company can’t require you to upgrade with only its own branded parts to retain the warranty. This important act protects your rights as a consumer and allows you to install upgrades with peace of mind confidence.

However, the warranty doesn’t cover any damage incurred while installing upgrades.
 

Krayzkat

Suspended
Apr 22, 2011
754
1,353
Turning on your iMac is a risk. Anything could happen. Could be a short circuit developed inside the case and the earthing connection broke at same time. It could overheat and explode in your face.

Just leave your iMac in the box, just incase.

In fact, don't even read these forums anymore incase it makes you go blind.
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,897
Turning on your iMac is a risk. Anything could happen. Could be a short circuit developed inside the case and the earthing connection broke at same time. It could overheat and explode in your face.

Just leave your iMac in the box, just incase.

In fact, don't even read these forums anymore incase it makes you go blind.

LOL. I want to give you 10 thumbs-up!

It's still a risk even if it's in the box.

The box is heavy and can cause serious injury or death.
 

HDFan

Contributor
Jun 30, 2007
6,762
2,971
If you actually watched the video, you know he couldn't get his computer fixed because Apple can't get the parts.

And in the text it says:

"but the actual reason is likely rooted in policy. "

Apple cannot void the warranty simply because you opened your iMac.

Maybe so. But if they refuse then how long is it going to take/how much is it going to cost you to force them to repair it?
 

tubeexperience

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Feb 17, 2016
3,192
3,897
And in the text it says:

"but the actual reason is likely rooted in policy. "

Maybe so. But if they refuse then how long is it going to take/how much is it going to cost you to force them to repair it?

Have you ever heard of a small claims court before?
[doublepost=1529711968][/doublepost]
I once knew a guy who read the instructions. 8 paper cuts he got. He could never play the piano again.

I knew I should have quit piano a long time ago!

I got so many paper cuts over the years!
 
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