DSLR Filter Question

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by harleymhs, Apr 2, 2014.

  1. harleymhs macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    #1
    Hey Guys, QUICK question, I'm looking for a filter to use outside when its BRIGHT and SUNNY ( water , snow, sunsets ) to enhance the colors on a DSLR with a 62 mm filter.. Im looking to achieve "sunglasses" for my lens.. Do I go with a ND filter or Circular Polarizing Filter... Thanks!!!
     
  2. BJMRamage macrumors 68020

    BJMRamage

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2007
    #2
    Aren't many sunglasses Polarized?
    (I wear glasses so don't always know my sunglasses info)

    I have both. Polarizer boosts skies and cuts reflections.

    ND blocks all light, not differentiation.
     
  3. harleymhs thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Jul 19, 2009
    #3
    So im looking for the Cirl polar filter to enhance colors and do what my Sunglasses do ( yes I do have ploarized glasses ) LOL
     
  4. PixelpusherBV macrumors member

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    Dec 16, 2013
    Location:
    Harwich, UK
    #4
    Yep, circular polariser. Use a nd filter to shut the light down if you want to extend your exposure time.
    You can use the CirPol in conjunction with a neutral gradient to level the light from sky to ground.
     
  5. harleymhs thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Jul 19, 2009
    #5
    got it! I just ordered HOYA 62mm Circlar Polarizing Pro 1 Digital multi coated glass filter, and the Sony UV mutli coated filter for every day use! thank you for your help guys!!!
     
  6. nburwell macrumors 68040

    nburwell

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    PHL
    #6
    OP, you made the correct choice, and Hoya is a good filter brand as well.
     
  7. ChrisA macrumors G4

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    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #7

    The pol. filter will make for a darker sky and more vivid colors and you can adjust the effect by rotating the filter.

    The ND filter only allows you to use a slower shutter speed or wider f-stop but otherwise does not effect the image.

    For must people now-days we do this kind of thing in post processing. Shoot in RAW format then you have many options later. You can do most of this in Photoshop.

    In short, now days with computer post processing I'd say the only useful filters are the Pol. and maybe, sometimes a gradient filter if shooting landscapes from a tripod. but people are doing HDR now rather then using a gradient filter. so that leaves the Pol. filter.
     
  8. BJMRamage macrumors 68020

    BJMRamage

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2007
    #8
    A ND filter can produce effects not really doable in post production.

    They could allow water to turn wispy in daytime hours when using a long shutter isn't possible. It can allow you to get a smaller DOF when using a larger aperture (the smaller number, maybe I wrote that wrong). You can use a ND to get lines for fireworks.

    Simply darkening the image can be done via PP but using it to affect the motion of an object in a photo cannot be replicated (Perhaps using multiple shots and then layers and masks in PS or the like)
     
  9. Cheese&Apple macrumors 68000

    Cheese&Apple

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    Location:
    Toronto
    #9
    A lot of this is just not true Chris.

    The primary purpose of a polarized filter is to remove unwanted glare from reflected surfaces such as glass. A spin-off effect of the polarized filter and removing glare is saturated colours with fewer clipped highlights.

    Unwanted glare is difficult to edit out. Saturating colour is very easy in post.

    The effects of an ND filter and the resulting slow shutter speeds on an image are wide ranging depending on the effect you're trying to achieve.

    Bottom line is that using each of these filters, when used for their intended purpose, can produce great results. Neither should be considered easily replaced by post-production especially the ND filter effects.

    OP, your choice should always be optical effects over post-production effects. Just make sure you understand the purpose of optical effects.
     
  10. harleymhs thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Jul 19, 2009
    #10
    Thank u for all of your great and helpful replies!!!!
     
  11. macjonny1 macrumors 6502a

    macjonny1

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    Jan 10, 2006
    #11
    ND filters IMHO are the most useful as they will allow slower shutter speeds in daylight.
     
  12. PixelpusherBV macrumors member

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    Harwich, UK
    #12

    Wise words from Cheese&Apple.
     
  13. ChrisA macrumors G4

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    Jan 5, 2006
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    Redondo Beach, California
    #13
    Yes, exactly. That is why I said the only filter you really need is the polarizer. The other effects can be done in post processing. I was actually agreeing with you.

    The ND filter is good but it's rare that you'd need it for still photos. Yu can usually shoot at fast shutter speed and low ISO. It is more us full for video where maybe you can't get the shutter speed so fast but still want to shoot with wide open f-stop. Also in video post production is harder, way harder if the subject or background is moving.
     
  14. Borntorun macrumors member

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    Nov 15, 2011
    Location:
    Perth, Australia
    #14
    Not quite. Try achieving shallow depth of field in broad daylight at f/1.2 (say) without over exposing.

    Try using fill-in flash at wide apertures during broad daylight - when most flashes has a sync speed of around 1/200s....
     
  15. Alexander.Of.Oz macrumors 68000

    Alexander.Of.Oz

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    Oct 29, 2013
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #15
    I can see that being true for people shots, but for me with landscapes and architectural images, it is my go to filter... I can't achieve 5 minute blurs of clouds without it. I don't ever use a polariser, unless I want to see under water, to get details of rocks, or to cut down reflections and glare from windows. I absolutely hate over-saturated blue skies in images, but that's just my opinion! Which means S.F.A.! ;)
     
  16. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #16
    That depends heavily on the value of "you" and the things you shoot.

    A polarizer won't get you significantly larger apertures for subject isolation in daylight. While you _can_ do some of that in post, it's not easy and won't quite be the same in terms of Bokeh.

    Nor will it give you significantly longer shutter speeds for moving water or deleting people- both also not really great post tasks. Want razor-think DoF, but motion blur for sports- such as horses legs, motorcycle and automobile wheels? Ever tried to shoot a helicopter or piston engined aircraft at an airshow in direct sunlight and get prop motion? Yup, ND filter again.

    Paul
     

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