DSLR nub

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Elevon, Jan 6, 2012.

  1. Elevon macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2011
    #1
    Hi all,

    I've decided to start photography, my aunt & uncle are buying me my first DSLR - Canon 600D (late christmas present), in a few weeks time when they come to visit me.

    Would it be necessarily to prepare/buy camera accessories? If yes, suggestions would be helpful e.g. Type of SD cards? Lens? Tripod? - I have approx. 400 pounds to spend (money saved when I initial wanted to buy a DSLR myself :eek:)

    TY.
     
  2. Zh2 macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2011
    Location:
    In a house in England.
    #2
    Hi,

    I will start you off....

    A tripod!

    A good one too. Manfrotto is a good brand in my book at least. Be prepared to spend around 200+ on one though.

    Regards.

    Z
     
  3. ergdegdeg Moderator emeritus

    ergdegdeg

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2007
    #3
    What kind of photography are you interested in?
     
  4. ashman70 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2010
    #4

    You can spend that much just on the legs, never mind the head, they can cost another $100.00 and there are many to choose from.
     
  5. SkippyScud macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2011
    Location:
    USA
    #5
    for photo Class 6 or higher SD card are good. For video 8 or 10 is best.

    Since you are starting out, get used to what your lens can do before going out for more. A tri-pod is a great addition but no need to spend all the money on that, a affordable one to get you started will work.

    As you get more experience with the hardware you have you will learn what else you will want from your photography and can build from there.

    I found I love taking pictures of food :) So a 200$ tripod makes no sense to me, a $30 one does the job since I hold my camera. But comes in handy when I see some out door shots I want to take. Also from that I found out the limits to the 15-55 lens my kit came with, so I went for a 20mm wide angle and a macro lens for all that lovely food.

    Enjoy the hobby! It's very fun.
     
  6. El Cabong macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2008
    #6
    That's the most important question. There's no shortage of photographic equipment to buy, and 400 pounds can go pretty quickly (or even be inadequate).

    The best thing to do is buy an SD card (as SkippyScud suggested) and then go out and take some pictures. You should know if you need any equipment as you learn how to shoot. Don't be in a hurry to blow money on camera gear, because you'll end up wasting it.
     
  7. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    Location:
    Wherever I hang my hat...
    #7
    Save your money. Get acquainted with your new camera. Be adventurous. Take lots of pix. You'll soon find out what you need next (of course it may be something as unexciting as an external hard drive to store all your pix)...
     
  8. initialsBB macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2010
    #8
    I second this motion.
     
  9. Designer Dale macrumors 68040

    Designer Dale

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    Mar 25, 2009
    Location:
    Folding space
    #9
    Do as Doylem says and save your money for now. All you need is a class 4 SD card with about 8 GB of space. I used a class 4 card for the first year I was into digital photography. A strap and simple case that don't say "Canon" on them is a good idea. Don't advertise that you have a DSLR from a major manufacturer. Op/Tech USA makes nice straps for around $25USD. iPhoto will serve you well while you get started, don't get talked into Lightroom/Aperture/PhotoShop. That comes later if photography really gets under your skin.

    Good luck and show us your pics.

    Dale
     
  10. Elevon thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2011
    #10
    Thank you for the feedbacks, they have indeed helped me out a lot!
    In the end I have made a final decision that I will first purchase an SD card (will do some research first though into them before buying) then save the money until what my 'photos/camera' tell me what to use it on =b

    Off the top of my head, I am most interested in Nature, Country, Wildlife or Urban/Industrial. But really anything, I meet or encounter.

    Thanks a lot,
     
  11. jdavtz macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Location:
    Kenya
    #11
    A book, unless you already really know what you're doing.

    My wife has found "Understanding Exposure" to be really helpful in getting to grips with using her DSLR to its full potential.
     
  12. Elevon thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2011
    #12
    Thank you so much for the suggestion, I will think about it :)
    I currently have 'some' knowledge in photography taught from my uncle and the 600D has a feature on teaching beginner photographers. I'll see how this goes first.

    Thanks!
     
  13. firestarter macrumors 603

    firestarter

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Location:
    Green and pleasant land
    #13
    Get the Canon 50 f1.8 and try using that. It's really cheap - and cheaper second hand.

    What this will give you compared to any kit zoom is the ability to experiment with depth of field, and will also remove the distraction that the choice of focal lengths in a zoom provides.
     
  14. bluemonkeyguy macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    #14
    Get a good prime lens to start off instead of sticking with the standard zoom lens kit it comes with. The 50mm f/1.8 is a good one.
     
  15. tjsdaname macrumors 6502

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  16. Blakeco123 macrumors regular

    Blakeco123

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    #16
    My input:
    I have a $16 6 foot tall tri-pod that works just as well as a $200 tri-pod would. If im correct the canon 600d can shoot full 1080p video, so you should get a class 8 or higher sd card so your videos don't have stuttering frames. Also I would suggest getting a lens based on what you like to photograph. The kit lens is usually a good walking around lens. While a 50mm f/1.4 would be a great macro lens. or you could get a telephoto zoom lens. Theres a a lot of choices.
     
  17. avaloncourt macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    #17
    That's a very good suggestion. That's an excellent and very affordable lens.
     
  18. flosseR macrumors 6502a

    flosseR

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Location:
    the cold dark north
    #18
    I am with doylem on this. do NOT buy anything yet. get used to the camera and get "Understanding Exposure" and read it. If you are completely new you will need that more than a tripod, a lens or whatever else...

    Get used to the camera, understand what photography is about and when you have gotten to that, THEN consider buying something.. definitely NOT a 300 dollar tripod yet.. you don't even know if you like the hobby or not..
    spend 2 dollars on a book, and another 20-30 for a good memory card... then start shooting.
     
  19. sapporobaby macrumors 68000

    sapporobaby

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2007
    Location:
    3 earth minutes from your location....
    #19
    The most incorrect statement of this thread. Try mounting a Nikon D3S + the 70-200mm VRII, and watch it all fall to the ground. If you're not sure what you're talking about that is okay but don't feel the need to spread incorrect info.

    With that now being corrected, to the OP, shoot, shoot, and shoot some more. Don't be afraid of the results. Learn the camera until you know what all the functions do. This will come in handy if you decide later to upgrade. You will be familiar with the dials and settings before hand. Don't buy anything just yet. Maybe a decent bag. If you are interested in some online courses, you can peek over at: www.betterphoto.com and see if any of their courses might interest you. Having fun is all that really matters.
     
  20. Pikemann Urge macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2007
    Location:
    melbourne.au
    #20
    Why this lens? There's nothing wrong with it, of course, but remember that the 600D has a smaller sensor than a 5D/1Ds. You're recommending a lens which is a 'standard' lens on a 1Ds but a short telephoto on a 600D.

    If Elevon just bought a 5D would you recommend a 75mm lens to start with?
     
  21. flosseR macrumors 6502a

    flosseR

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Location:
    the cold dark north
    #21
    i would recommend either the 50mm or the 85mm, personally I would go with the 85mm .. simple as that. for the 600D i WOULD say get a 50mm but not NOW, later...
     
  22. firestarter macrumors 603

    firestarter

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Location:
    Green and pleasant land
    #22
    As a 5DII and 550D owner, I'm well aware of that, thanks! :rolleyes:

    Does Canon make a 75mm lens for £85?

    Which lens would you recommend as a first cheap prime on a cropped-sensor Canon? The 50 isn't the ideal general purpose lens (being a short tele) but it is very fast and very cheap.

    Canon's wider primes are all at least 4x more expensive. The 24f2.8 (which I own) and the 35f2 are both a bit slow and wide to really play around with DOF. The 35 f1.4 would be ideal but of course it's >£1k. The 28f1.8 looks OK on paper, but it's 'bokeh' is awful.

    Perhaps the closest ideal lens would be one of the Sigmas... the 28f1.8 or 30f1.4, but again they're all 4x more expensive than Canon's 50 f1.8.

    Nope, the 50 f1.8 is an ideal second lens (after the kit zoom) for any crop factor Canon precisely because it's so cheap it can be a 'no brainer' purchase... and it opens the door to more creative photography. Other primes may be bought over time - but it would probably be better to save their purchase until the OP has more experience and knows what he wants.
     
  23. steveash macrumors 6502

    steveash

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2008
    Location:
    UK
    #23
    Me too. When you get your camera you will have enough to play with and think about. I've wasted too much money buying gear and then putting it on Ebay a couple of months later. Only get stuff when you are saying to yourself "I just can't get the pictures of X I so desperately want without a Y."
     
  24. bunit macrumors regular

    bunit

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Location:
    Westerly RI
    #24


    Couldn't agree more! If you start pending your money now, before you even touch your new camera, your bound to waste it on things you think you need or want, only to find out, there were better things you could have purchased. Get to know your camera 1st, and most important... just have fun with it!
     
  25. danahn17 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2009
    #25
    I realize i'm a little late to this party but I had a slightly different suggestion. Instead of spending the money on gear, I'd look into a photography class at a local college or art school or something.

    Not only will you learn the basics of photography (though you did mention your uncle did teach you a little) but by presenting and critiquing your photos, you really can grow as a photographer.

    Either way, best of luck and have fun! :)
     

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