Dual Band on new AEBS question

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by pilotError, Mar 3, 2009.

  1. pilotError macrumors 68020

    pilotError

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Location:
    Long Island
    #1
    What does the dual band do for you?

    I was thinking about buying a second AEBS for Wireless N access only since mixed mode slows down when a G device is connected. Does this new AEBS get around that by having all the N devices at 5ghz and all the G devices at 2.4 ghz?

    I guess a basic explanation is in order here.
     
  2. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #2
    Dual band is already on the previous devices, but is introduced is simultaneous dual band—of course I'm sure that's what you meant.

    That said, this allows you to dedicate on channel like you said to a specific use; for example we know a lot of devices are G only still, but we don't want our N-network to slow down right? Just get the 5-GHz to N and then the 2.4-GHz to mixed. If you have just specific requirements or filters on your network, say 2.4 for your kids' computers and you want to restrict that to a certain timeframe and such, while leaving the 5.0 to your other needs. Of course the latter, I don't even know if the AEBS supports (I will find out tomorrow), but there are routers that offer that.
     
  3. pilotError thread starter macrumors 68020

    pilotError

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Location:
    Long Island
    #3
    I read the manual, which looked more like a quick start guide. There wasn't any mention of the dual band at all.

    I'm assuming what I mentioned was the reason for both bands being active, but I'd like to get confirmation before jumping in.

    Let me know how you make out.
     
  4. makismagoo99 macrumors regular

    makismagoo99

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2006
    #4
    Someone correct me if I'm wrong here, but my understanding from reading Apple's product page was that you can simultaneously connect devices that run at N and G frequencies without speed loss. For example, I have an iPhone (802.11g capable) and a MacBook (802.11n capable). With the previous AEBS, if I'm using ONLY my MacBook with my N router, then I'll connect at N speeds. However, once I turn on my iPhone, the speed for the entire network drops to G. With the new AEBS, both devices can connect to their individual bands without affecting the other.
     
  5. emt1 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2008
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    #5
    This is mostly correct. One mistake is that if your AirPort (old model) is set to g/n compatibility, then you will never reach true 802.11n speeds. You need to be on 5Ghz for full 802.11n speeds.
     

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