Early 2011 17inch MBP - Battery drains even when power is connected

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by rbmanian75, Dec 14, 2012.

  1. rbmanian75 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    #1
    Hi,

    In Early 2011 17inch MBP the battery drains even when the power source is connected under some load.

    To test i used smalluxGPU and stressed the cpu for 50% usage..even at 50% load the battery drains even when the power is connected.

    I tried the same application in mid 2010 mbp and there is no battery drain in that with the power connected.

    Any help would be appreciated
     
  2. jcampbell1070 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2010
    Location:
    NC
    #2
    Mine does the same thing while I'm playing call of duty black ops. I remember awhile back this was talked about and it is normal.
     
  3. rbmanian75 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    #3
    If it is by design, Why then this is not happening in 2010 mid mbp.

    ...50% cpu load is not a high load...this reduces the battery life is it not?

    thanks
     
  4. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #4
    Probably because the Mid-2010 MacBook Pro has a crappier processor. ;)
     
  5. rbmanian75 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    #5
    You are right...it is got a crappier processor.....
     
  6. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    #6
    They didn't jump to quad core options until 2011. The gpu may also be somewhat more power hungry. Unfortunately Apple doesn't offer any power brick options that can power the machine at higher loads without this restriction. When you read about complaints with the size of chargers from some other brands, they're gigantic for a reason.
     
  7. vpro macrumors 65816

    vpro

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    #7
    "Power" readings??????????

    Hello everyone,

    Please help me make sense of all these numbers and if I should be mindful of anything in particular about my two refurb 17" MBPs of late 2011 and 2.5Ghz quadcore i7 notebooks (recently arrived to me to test drive):

    [​IMG]

    and

    [​IMG]

    Are the numbers typical and in good over all levels or should I be concerned?


    Thanks much!
     
  8. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #8
    It is not normal.

    IT IS A BAD DESIGN.

    Note how much juice the battery outs out.

    And how much the AC adapter puts out.

    Then make note of how blisteringly hot the AC adapter gets when it's plugged into your MBP you're using. It gets scalding to the touch.

    Then find out how much the MBP needs.

    Now tell me how all of that is normal, when clearly it is not?

    It is not normal.
    IT IS A BAD DESIGN.

    Then don't be wowed when benchmark tests (ala Macworld) show the 17" 2011 MBP to be faster despite having identical hardware to the 15" 2011 MBP. The reason the 17" is faster because the battery is supplementing popwer.

    That is not normal.
    IT IS A BAD DESIGN.

    Third party review sites point out that the unit often throttles because there isn't enough power...

    It is not normal.
    IT IS A BAD DESIGN.

    And for only 2x+ the price of a comparable laptop that is given sufficient power in order to do the work demanded of it.

    Now wonder why Apple had more powerful CPU build-to-order options... that would be the most blind, dumb, and idiotic waste of money - if the shelf models aren't competently built to run the CPU at full speed and rely on the battery to keep going, there is no way a higher-spec CPU in a BTO configuration will make even the slightest difference.

    http://www.notebookcheck.net/Review...-GHz-quad-core-glare-type-screen.50346.0.html
    (that has some more info on throttling as well -- higher temps or inadequate power leads to throttling, to prevent damage (thus proving anyone who says running a laptop at 100C all the time has no clue...) Most competent computer makers understand these simple issues as well...)

    It is not normal.
    IT IS A BAD DESIGN.

    It's a truly poor design and customers let Apple get away with it. Nobody else will step in and it's clear Apple can't be bothered to regulate itself to prevent these issues from happening in the first place.

    ----------

    And so poorly cooled that reviewers found the 2010 model getting well above 100C... that's bad.

    Any technical forum will tell you it is never good to run CPUs at a hotter temperature for any length of time, despite the CPU's thermal limits. Yes, it can run at 100C. No, it is not advisable or recommended to do so (duh).
     
  9. vpro macrumors 65816

    vpro

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    #9
    please someone help me understand these numbers?

    refer to my above previous post please, anyone? :confused:
     
  10. rbmanian75 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    #10

    It is so obvious and well said...i completely agree with you.....it is a bad design....nothing to say more....
     

Share This Page