Earth From Space

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Lateralus11, Dec 22, 2008.

  1. Lateralus11 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    #1
    Hey guys, I found this online the other day and thought some of y'all might enjoy reading it. I hope it sparks a good discussion.

    [​IMG]
    ''We succeeded in taking that picture [from deep space], and, if you look at it, you see a dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you know, everyone you love, everyone you've ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of all our joys and sufferings, thousands of confident religions, ideologies and economic doctrines. Every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilizations, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every hopeful child, every mother and father, every inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every superstar, every supreme leader, every saint and sinner in the history of our species, lived there - on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

    The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of the dot on scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner of the dot. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light.
    Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity -- in all this vastness -- there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. It is up to us. It's been said that astronomy is a humbling, and I might add, a character-building experience. To my mind, there is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly and compassionately with one another and to preserve and cherish this pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known.''

    -Carl Sagan

    I believe this picture was taken from the Voyager mission (from my vague memory from 10th grade Astronomy) I dont know who the author is, but if anyone knows, please let me know so I can give proper credit.

    Have a good one :apple:
     
  2. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #2
    Way to make me feel insignificant. The most interesting bit I think is that people think that we'll one day have the ability to move anywhere in space. If you look at it this way you realize that we're so insignificant that even if we were able to go anywhere we'd never find anything, space is just too vast to map it all or even a fraction of it all.
     
  3. SteveMobs macrumors 6502

    SteveMobs

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Location:
    Washington D.C.
    #3
    It's definitely a thought provoking idea. You are the chance culmination of a few particles. you will last maybe 80 years in the greater scope of this 13,000,000,000 year happening. The things that you do in your lifetime, who will they matter to? What significance will you have to anyone or anything?

    If you begin to think like that ^^^ you'll be no good. Everything needs to be seen relatively, from your perspective. Just do the best you can, otherwise things will turn rather depressing rather quickly.
     
  4. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    Location:
    On tenterhooks
    #4
    Our life-cycle is much smaller than that of a mayfly, when considering the vastness of space.

    We are not going anywhere anytime soon.
     
  5. Prof. macrumors 601

    Prof.

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    #5
    We can and will. :)

    Between 2050-2100, NΛSΛ plans to build structures that will affectively transmogrify Mars into a "clone" of our planet, Earth. These structures will emit vast amounts CO₂ into the Martian atmosphere. Slowly, over 100 years, the CO₂ will build-up and begin to turn the red skies blue. After about 150+ years, the surrounding ares of the structures will begin to flourish and grass and other small shrubs will begin to grow. Once they accomplish that, NΛSΛ will place its first settlers on Mars. In all, it will probably take 500 years from start to finish to transform the red planet.:eek:
     
  6. emt1 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2008
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    #6
    That's neat. BAN SAME-SEX MARRIAGE!!


    [/sarcasm]
     
  7. BoingoBongo macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2008
    #7
    Awesome post.

    The original author was Carl Sagan, and the picture is known as the "Pale Blue Dot Photo."
     
  8. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #8
    pfft You really think that Mars is far away?
     
  9. Prof. macrumors 601

    Prof.

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    #9
    With today's technology, it would take about 9 months (one way) by conventional chemical rocket propulsion systems. By 2050/2100, who knows how long it would take to reach Mars. Maybe half the time.
     
  10. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #10
    I'm saying that we're practically touching Mars when compared to the vastness of space.
     
  11. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #11
    The Martian atmoshpere is currently over 95% carbon dioxide: adding more will make it even less habitable.
     
  12. Lateralus11 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    #12
    Thanks for your assistance!

    Heres another interesting little bit on the "Hubble Deep Field Image" if you have time.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgg2tpUVbXQ

    Hopefully this isnt breaking any forum rules, I didnt see any.

    I dont know why, but Ive always taken a keen interest in astronomy. Hope y'all enjoy. Sorry if it makes you feel more insignificant :eek:
     
  13. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #13
    Hubble Ultra Deep Field is another amazing image.

    [​IMG]

    Each one of those points of light is not a star, but a galaxy, each containing billions of stars. This photo contains approximately 10,000 galaxies, all in a patch of sky just one-tenth the diameter of the Moon as seen from Earth. It required 800 exposures taken over the course of 400 Hubble orbits around the earth (or 4 months), which equals over 15 days of exposure time.
     
  14. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #14
    I get chills whenever I watch THIS video that scales the Earth to other planets and stars.


    So does THIS.
     
  15. Prof. macrumors 601

    Prof.

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    #15
    Hmhmm... then maybe it was something else. The point is, it's theoretically possible to transform a planet to make it habitable.
     
  16. twistedlegato macrumors 65816

    twistedlegato

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2006
    #16
    Oh nose! I got Tom Jonesed! :D


    Space makes me wonder so much. I just really have to know what's out there. The fact there are billions and billions of galaxies and the fact that our own solar system is ridiculously large completely bewilders me. There HAS to be other life out there. Not stereotypical aliens. Maybe there are even other human races. I just need to know! :(
     
  17. floyde macrumors 6502a

    floyde

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Location:
    Monterrey, México
    #17
    I'd say humble is a better way to describe it. To me there's nothing more inspiring than Sagan's crystal clear prose, which reads a lot like poetry. If you haven't already, you should pick up one of his books. They're filled with lots of awesome quotes like the one you posted.

    You mean Tommy gunned? ;):D
     
  18. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #18
    Chlorofluorocarbons probably. However, I'd suggest that the process is far more difficult than it may seem.

    You have four issues: atmosphere, temperature, gravity (mass) and magnetosphere.

    The first two can be addressed by introducing more efficient greenhouse gases. However, Mars' mass is so small, that its atmosphere is constantly escaping into space, and would therefore need to continually be replenished. Additionally, the lack of gravity may or may not be extremely detrimental to human health (and cannot be artificially increased).

    The lack of a magnetic field is a serious problem, as it's the only protection from solar radiation; within hours of landing on Mars an unprotected human would exceed the recommended annual exposure to radiation.
     
  19. valdore macrumors 65816

    valdore

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Location:
    Kansas City, Missouri. USA
    #19
    Hmmm.. yeah... we're gonna have to cut this out of the federal budget starting fiscal '09. Sorry.
     
  20. joepunk macrumors 68030

    joepunk

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2004
    Location:
    a profane existence
  21. BoingoBongo macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2008
    #21
    I agree completely. It seems like everything we've ever learned about the universe moves us further from the center. First we thought the Earth was the center of everything, then we thought the sun was the center, then the solar system, and then the galaxy, and so on. To me, Earth being the only planet with life puts us right back in the "center," where we don't belong.

    I'm sure there's tons of life out there, and I've often wondered how much of it is similar to us. It's crazy to imagine other societies with art, music, culture, fast-food restaurants, etc...
     
  22. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #23
    ^^^^

    Why are you determined to get this moved to the PRSI forum?
     

Share This Page