Education help

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Lilatove, Jul 16, 2013.

  1. Lilatove macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2013
    #1
    So I have noticed a hole that is starting to grow in the IT networking side of Apple. Many doctors, and other professionals want to use their apps, iPads, and other divices at work but this is creating a huge problem since the network protocols and other related aspects are different between PC and Mac. I am in school now Pursuing a triple major but I would really like to refocus on this career path yet nether my current degrees nor my military experience have anything to do with this dilemma thus I'm stuck. First of all I don't know the right questions to ask and second I live in Sacramento CA and don't know the best places to learn such things. I know I'm sinking in quick sand but I'm hoping some of you can enlighten me as to the systems I needed to learn, where I should study, and over all point me in the right direction. I'm an information sponge so anything you think could help me, even if its constructive criticism, I want to hear it. Thanks!
     
  2. 63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Location:
    norcal
    #2
    Since I have started using computers 20 years ago, it was always the Mac for my home.

    However, after becoming a PC tech after college a few years later I have seen PCs rule the day, especially networks with PCs. What are your degrees?

    Even if you have computer science, it does not directly relate to networking. Go for the most common stuff and work with PC networks and get Microsoft certified. It may not be the most fun, or best designed, but still the most in demand. Cisco stuff is also good to know.
     
  3. Lilatove thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2013
    #3
    Well life moves pretty quick and I have realized that my initial thoughts were flawed. I have been redirected on another course with similar goals just a different path. No longer is it the case that I want to study apple, well not at first anyway. I now see that it is in my interest to learn Cisco first, then incorporate that knowledge once mastered with apple since PC networks are still the industry standard.

    I guess my question is now

    Since I am coming from the liberal arts side of the house with very little in depth computer knowledge, how do I close that gap with my peers who will have much more experience. Do you recommend any literature, or videos I should watch?

    Aside from Cisco, do you recommend any other platforms I should learn? Certificates that I should obtain?

    Thanks!
     
  4. 63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Location:
    norcal
    #4
    Technical - Being a programmer is a good thing but not that much of a benefit if you are going into Cisco/Microsoft certifications. I too had a liberal arts degree (business human resources) and what technical stuff was not too hard

    Gap - Employers don't care if you a whiz in math and physics and while old school networking professionals had engineering bachelor's degrees, the posts once held by them were actually replaced by certified technicians where some had degrees and others didn't

    Literature - Anything other than Microsoft press is great. O'Reilly is good once you are into it some time. Scott Mueller's book on fixing PCs is the ultimate first step for any technician or network engineer/administrator. Mueller's book is considered the bible of computer repair or the A+ certification. A+ is a certification great for basic stuff including security (Security+) and networking (Network+). Just two of the basic CompTIA certifications like A+ and another may be all you need in your career. It's that useful to employers.

    Platforms - Cisco, Microsoft, Linux, and way down the line, Apple. Also besides CompTIA certifications, the CISSP is a good advanced security certification. Cisco has the most advanced certification which not only is the most respected in certifications, but the best letters you can have behind your name, including PhD, and that's the Cisco CCIE which is the Cisco Certified Internetworking Expert. It was originally the certification that Cisco router salespeople had to have in order to know and sell this stuff and be able to offer minor answers to servicing. It covers so much that it's still the absolute gold standard and among over a million takers of the test, fewer than 1,000 people achieved this level back in the '90s.

    You have your four year degree which is good and shows employers you can stick to something and have commitment. It does not make you a sage, but it's still better than nothing. Having a certification shows you can take some information that is rather dry, synthesize it, and pass the test. But having a degree and at least one certification is a great way to get a foot in the door.

    Once you are in then it's your jobs and duties you have performed that will be all that matters. I would want somebody to fix my computer or network and I don't care if they have letters behind their name. You need the certification and/or simple bachelor's degree to have an advantage of getting the foot in the door. If all you have is a two year degree, then mention that.

    There's still a great need for a lot of bodies on site to do IT work so it's not just given to only those with best degree and certification. The massive burnout in this field always allows for opportunity and advancement.
     

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