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Pinkly Smooth

macrumors regular
Original poster
Sep 8, 2018
105
3
For some reason, when I touch the bottom part of my iMac, it gives off an electric shock. What does this mean and how do I get rid of this problem? Thank you.
 

4sallypat

macrumors 68000
Sep 16, 2016
1,807
1,488
So Calif
Check your ground connection on the outlet.

Use a voltage test that tests all 3 lines (hot, neutral & ground).
Most common problem is that the hot/neutral is reversed or the ground is missing.

Then check you power cord using a DMM/DVM for 3 lines continuity.

If all that has been checked, the power supply inside may be the culprit...
 
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Pinkly Smooth

macrumors regular
Original poster
Sep 8, 2018
105
3
Check your ground connection on the outlet.

Use a voltage test that tests all 3 lines (hot, neutral & ground).
Most common problem is that the hot/neutral is reversed or the ground is missing.

Then check you power cord using a DMM/DVM for 3 lines continuity.

If all that has been checked, the power supply inside may be the culprit...
Ok thanks. Is there a possibility that this could cause damage to my iMac?
 
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4sallypat

macrumors 68000
Sep 16, 2016
1,807
1,488
So Calif
The Mac has protection systems built in - wouldn't worry so much about the iMac.
I'd rather more about what is causing a voltage leak that can damage a human being....

Have it checked out by an electrician if you lack the testing tools.

On a side note last year, we had a teacher get shocked at work by a bad outlet on her iMac and she had to be transported to the ER. The school electrician found a missing neutral and 240V ungrounded was coming into the iMac. When he measured the AC voltage off the Mac to ground, it measured 90VAC. The iMac didn't get harmed because it is rated for 100-240V range. The teacher luckily suffered a minor burn.
 
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Fishrrman

macrumors Core
Feb 20, 2009
21,687
7,897
Are you in the USA or Canada?
Do you have a standard 120v wall outlet, with 3 openings (hot, neutral, ground)?
If so, you can buy an "outlet tester" for a few dollars that will tell you if the outlet is properly wired.
 
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Pinkly Smooth

macrumors regular
Original poster
Sep 8, 2018
105
3
I live in Europe. I also have the same problem with my keyboard. Thanks for the help.
 
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Erehy Dobon

Suspended
Feb 16, 2018
2,162
1,990
No service
Many Western European countries also have grounded outlets. You say "Europe" which isn't helpful since there is no single standard electrical code for residential construction that covers the EU.

Seek the help of a qualified electrician.
 
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glenthompson

Contributor
Apr 27, 2011
2,548
535
Virginia
We had a problem on my wife’s iMac where the edge of the hole in the stand cut through the cable and exposed the hot lead. It was on a GFCI circuit which tripped so no harm done. Took some time to trace why the breaker was tripping.
 
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Fishrrman

macrumors Core
Feb 20, 2009
21,687
7,897
If you're in a country that just uses a 2-prong plug (NO ground), then you may very well feel a slight "tingling" when the Mac is plugged in. Laptop users complain about this as well.
 
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glenthompson

Contributor
Apr 27, 2011
2,548
535
Virginia
If you're in a country that just uses a 2-prong plug (NO ground), then you may very well feel a slight "tingling" when the Mac is plugged in. Laptop users complain about this as well.
No it should not. There is no electrical connection from the incoming power or neutral return to the case. If this was the case it would never pass the various electrical safety standards around the world.
Any skin voltage on any device should be treated as a serious problem and fixed immediately.
 
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