Email to Tim Cook (Executive Relations)

mattkidd

macrumors regular
Original poster
Hey everyone!

Just though I'd let you know my recent experience.

As some of you may already know I've had problem after problem with my rMBP since launch day and have now requested my 4th replacement which is being processed as we speak.

I decided on Saturday evening UK time to send an email of complaint to Apple Europe. I also decided to include Tim cook in the email; wasn't expecting a response.

In the complaint I listed a number of things: my passion for Apple, my career with Apple, my experiences with the rMBP, my disappointment, my customers disappointments I also suggested some compensation.

Sunday morning about 9am I had a phone call from a blocked number. Turns out it was Apples Executive Relations phoning in regards to my email which Tim cook received. "Hello Mr Kidd I am phoning in regards to you email to Tim cook last night" Sorry to phone you on a Sunday morning but we believe it to be of some importance"

Basically to cut the story short... They want me to write a log on all of the machines and the problems I have encountered.They have also taken over all communications I have been having with Apple care and will now have authority. They have given me a number which apparently I can continue to use for any of my Apple Products :cool: and will discuss compensation when my new one arrives.


Not bad! Quite impressed, Apple Europe replied ignoring compensation question completely and that they have been told not to handle the case. Haha
 

vito

macrumors 6502a
Apr 4, 2006
678
37
Manchester, UK
Same here,

I've had three MBPr all with cosmetic scratches on the casing and dead pixels :(

Emailed Tim Cook and got a call next day from Exec Relations, they're sending out yet another replacement which they've let me upgrade.

Need to see what they can do about some compensation! :)
 

mattkidd

macrumors regular
Original poster
Same here,

I've had three MBPr all with cosmetic scratches on the casing and dead pixels :(

Emailed Tim Cook and got a call next day from Exec Relations, they're sending out yet another replacement which they've let me upgrade.

Need to see what they can do about some compensation! :)
That's interesting. Hopefully this means all these issues are being passed on internally, especially if they're directed to Tim Cook. We can only hope so, it's worth a try! ;)
 

jmmo20

macrumors 65816
Jun 15, 2006
1,132
94
Back in 2006 I got a white macbook and had all sort of problems with it. At some point it went to the service centre a substantial number of times (4 or 5). I wrote an email to Steve Jobs and got an email and later a call from one of the Apple Europe execs in Ireland.

He arranged a new MAcbook to be sent to me and guess my surprised when instead of a white macbook I got a top-range Macbook pro. That MBP is 5 years old and still use it as media center/time machine server.
 

MIDI_EVIL

macrumors 65816
Jan 23, 2006
1,320
13
UK
I too got results from emailing Steve Jobs back in 2006 about a white MacBook plagued with problems. The next day I got a call from Executive Relations UK. A nice irish guy called Colin Scannel helped us get a new MacBook.

I wish I'd used the same method to sort my MacBook Pro logic board woes, but after 2 replacements and 4 periods without the machine, AppleCare gave me a new machine anyway.

----------

Back in 2006 I got a white macbook and had all sort of problems with it. At some point it went to the service centre a substantial number of times (4 or 5). I wrote an email to Steve Jobs and got an email and later a call from one of the Apple Europe execs in Ireland.

An almost identical story to mine! Maybe the same guy? Colin Scannel?
 

GoCubsGo

macrumors Nehalem
Feb 19, 2005
35,753
142
Same here,

I've had three MBPr all with cosmetic scratches on the casing and dead pixels :(

Emailed Tim Cook and got a call next day from Exec Relations, they're sending out yet another replacement which they've let me upgrade.

Need to see what they can do about some compensation! :)
Bummer. Your compensation is they're replacing your machine. No?
 

AZREOSpecialist

macrumors 68020
Mar 15, 2009
2,115
925
On what planet do you think it's appropriate to ask Apple for compensation? They are replacing your units under warranty, so why are you asking for compensation?

Hey everyone!

Just though I'd let you know my recent experience.

As some of you may already know I've had problem after problem with my rMBP since launch day and have now requested my 4th replacement which is being processed as we speak.

I decided on Saturday evening UK time to send an email of complaint to Apple Europe. I also decided to include Tim cook in the email; wasn't expecting a response.

In the complaint I listed a number of things: my passion for Apple, my career with Apple, my experiences with the rMBP, my disappointment, my customers disappointments I also suggested some compensation.

Sunday morning about 9am I had a phone call from a blocked number. Turns out it was Apples Executive Relations phoning in regards to my email which Tim cook received. "Hello Mr Kidd I am phoning in regards to you email to Tim cook last night" Sorry to phone you on a Sunday morning but we believe it to be of some importance"

Basically to cut the story short... They want me to write a log on all of the machines and the problems I have encountered.They have also taken over all communications I have been having with Apple care and will now have authority. They have given me a number which apparently I can continue to use for any of my Apple Products :cool: and will discuss compensation when my new one arrives.


Not bad! Quite impressed, Apple Europe replied ignoring compensation question completely and that they have been told not to handle the case. Haha
 

Gav2k

macrumors G3
Jul 24, 2009
9,217
1,586
On what planet do you think it's appropriate to ask Apple for compensation? They are replacing your units under warranty, so why are you asking for compensation?
Why shouldn't he? Most of us use our machines for work. Down time is an inconvenience hence compensation should be sought.
 

AZREOSpecialist

macrumors 68020
Mar 15, 2009
2,115
925
Why shouldn't he? Most of us use our machines for work. Down time is an inconvenience hence compensation should be sought.
That would only be true if the customer told Apple at the time of purchase that he would be basing his entire income around this particular computer and Apple agreed, in writing, that in the event of any down time it would compensate the OP. Utter nonsense.

If you are buying an Apple computer for work that generates income, and the computer Apple sold you is defective, you can't hold Apple liable for "damages". Presumably you still have the previous computer you used, Apple is not responsible for you putting all of your eggs in one basket. Apple is doing whatever it has agreed to do, in writing, at the time of purchase. They are fulfilling their end of the bargain that you made when you bought the machine.

Let's say that I sold you a blender and promised to fix it if it broke. You disclosed nothing to me about your intended use. You then decide, on your own, that you needed this blender in order to create food for an upcoming wedding banquet. The day of food prep the blender burns out. I offer to fix it, as I promised in the very beginning and owning up to my side of the deal, yet you insist on holding me responsible for the botched wedding banquet. Who do you think would prevail in court?
 

tcphoto

macrumors 6502a
Feb 23, 2005
758
2
Madison, GA
Congratulations on getting the attention of the home office, I hope that they take care of you. I have had two machines replaced because of issues. The first was bad out of the box and Apple made it as difficult as they could but finally replaced it. The second time, my local Apple Store showed that replacing a defective hard drive was an Olympian task. After multiple problems and fumbles, they replaced the MBP rather than spending more money trying to repair it. I hope that you don't have to go through what I did to have a properly working machine.
 

jmmo20

macrumors 65816
Jun 15, 2006
1,132
94
Yep that was him. I had a very nice chat with him.
I didn't remember his name at the time I wrote my message yesterday.

I too got results from emailing Steve Jobs back in 2006 about a white MacBook plagued with problems. The next day I got a call from Executive Relations UK. A nice irish guy called Colin Scannel helped us get a new MacBook.

I wish I'd used the same method to sort my MacBook Pro logic board woes, but after 2 replacements and 4 periods without the machine, AppleCare gave me a new machine anyway.

----------

Back in 2006 I got a white macbook and had all sort of problems with it. At some point it went to the service centre a substantial number of times (4 or 5). I wrote an email to Steve Jobs and got an email and later a call from one of the Apple Europe execs in Ireland.

An almost identical story to mine! Maybe the same guy? Colin Scannel?
 

mattkidd

macrumors regular
Original poster
That would only be true if the customer told Apple at the time of purchase that he would be basing his entire income around this particular computer and Apple agreed, in writing, that in the event of any down time it would compensate the OP. Utter nonsense.

If you are buying an Apple computer for work that generates income, and the computer Apple sold you is defective, you can't hold Apple liable for "damages". Presumably you still have the previous computer you used, Apple is not responsible for you putting all of your eggs in one basket. Apple is doing whatever it has agreed to do, in writing, at the time of purchase. They are fulfilling their end of the bargain that you made when you bought the machine.

Let's say that I sold you a blender and promised to fix it if it broke. You disclosed nothing to me about your intended use. You then decide, on your own, that you needed this blender in order to create food for an upcoming wedding banquet. The day of food prep the blender burns out. I offer to fix it, as I promised in the very beginning and owning up to my side of the deal, yet you insist on holding me responsible for the botched wedding banquet. Who do you think would prevail in court?

The reasoning for the compensation has no relation to the fact Apple are simply replacing something under warranty which is faulty. It's more down to the fact of the inconvenience caused; having to wait around for many couriers to deliver and collect previous machines and if anything it's only common decency in such situations to offer or provide compensation or a partial refund to customers. It's clearly not a great service and not something you should expect from a company of such size. This is not a legal dispute of what's right and wrong and who owes who, this is simply a businesses honouring it's claim for providing the best customer service and quality. I know americans like to get all legal with all of this, the fact is it's common decency to offer compensation in such situations.

When purchasing something especially something which is more than the average cost you expect the best quality and the best service, clearly something has gone wrong here it shouldn't simply be coincidence that I am now on my 5th machine within a few weeks. I had been promised by Apple that my replacements should all be the quality I expected; none have been.

I work alongside Apple in Retail and I know quality has been slipping and that's a fact. Therefore I saw it appropriate to voice my concerns outside of my role as a customer and request for them to be dealt with appropriately.
 

golf1410

macrumors 6502a
May 7, 2012
748
3
San Francisco, CA
I did the same. They don't let me replace a new one. Ask me to went by nearest apple store for inspection. Apple store manager had decided not to do anything since the MacBook Pro is still functional. What the hell?! Why did I get totally different result?
I think the email has never reached Tim Cook as those guys filter emails. They are just your point of contact.
 

golf1410

macrumors 6502a
May 7, 2012
748
3
San Francisco, CA
If you are still under 14 days of purchase, they will replace your devices. If not, they will not try to do anything beyond Apple policy. Beside that, executive customer relationship are just point of contact. They dont make the decisions.
 

dukebound85

macrumors P6
Jul 17, 2005
18,111
1,319
5045 feet above sea level
The reasoning for the compensation has no relation to the fact Apple are simply replacing something under warranty which is faulty. It's more down to the fact of the inconvenience caused; having to wait around for many couriers to deliver and collect previous machines and if anything it's only common decency in such situations to offer or provide compensation or a partial refund to customers. It's clearly not a great service and not something you should expect from a company of such size. This is not a legal dispute of what's right and wrong and who owes who, this is simply a businesses honouring it's claim for providing the best customer service and quality. I know americans like to get all legal with all of this, the fact is it's common decency to offer compensation in such situations.

When purchasing something especially something which is more than the average cost you expect the best quality and the best service, clearly something has gone wrong here it shouldn't simply be coincidence that I am now on my 5th machine within a few weeks. I had been promised by Apple that my replacements should all be the quality I expected; none have been.

I work alongside Apple in Retail and I know quality has been slipping and that's a fact. Therefore I saw it appropriate to voice my concerns outside of my role as a customer and request for them to be dealt with appropriately.
You just aren't owed anything from Apple apart from them working on the machine as per warranty. Anything else is them being generous
 

IGregory

macrumors 6502a
Aug 5, 2012
669
5
Why shouldn't he? Most of us use our machines for work. Down time is an inconvenience hence compensation should be sought.
Because it would be an abuse of the process. If everyone in a similar situation brought an action against any company for compensation for loss of use because the product was defective, think where the cost of products would be. The companies will pass the expense on to other customers. Take the new computer and move on.
 

mattkidd

macrumors regular
Original poster
You just aren't owed anything from Apple apart from them working on the machine as per warranty. Anything else is them being generous
Apple haven't delivered their promise of a good service? They haven't provided me with a product which is functional and of the quality you would expect. They have attempted to rectify this but still haven't. The fact is it's not a long-term problem that's different, its straight after purchase.

Your telling me if someone provided you a service let's say.... cleaning your house. Let's say they failed to deliver a good service on a number of occasions, with the house a mess and your possessions damaged. You would be prepared to pay them in full? or pay them at all?
 

dukebound85

macrumors P6
Jul 17, 2005
18,111
1,319
5045 feet above sea level
Apple haven't delivered their promise of a good service? They haven't provided me with a product which is functional and of the quality you would expect. They have attempted to rectify this but still haven't. The fact is it's not a long-term problem that's different, its straight after purchase.
It doesn't matter. They are upholding their end of their warranty agreement that you agreed upon when you purchased it.

Your telling me if someone provided you a service let's say.... cleaning your house. Let's say they failed to deliver a good service on a number of occasions, with the house a mess and your possessions damaged. You would be prepared to pay them in full? or pay them at all?
1) You bought a product
2) You agreed to their warranty service
3) They are abiding by that warranty agreement

You are wanting compensation (I would too). However, if they do, it is not because they have to as they are doing what they can to rectify the situation as per the agreement. Feeling entitled to additional compensation is nothing more than greed on your part

Why do you think warranties are in place to begin with?

Unless they have a written policy saying they will compensate you for your troubles, you really don't have a leg to stand on from a legal POV. It would be in their best interest to make you happy to keep you as a customer but by no means required of them.
 
Last edited:

mattkidd

macrumors regular
Original poster
It doesn't matter. They are upholding their end of their warranty agreement that you agreed upon when you purchased it.



1) You bought a product
2) You agreed to their warranty service
3) They are abiding by that warranty agreement

You are wanting compensation (I would too). However, if they do, it is not because they have to as they are doing what they can to rectify the situation as per the agreement. Feeling entitled to additional compensation is nothing more than greed on your part

Why do you think warranties are in place to begin with?

Unless they have a written policy saying they will compensate you for your troubles, you really don't have a leg to stand on.




I mean, if your car has a 3 year warranty, and has an issue, do you really expect to be compensated above and beyond them attempting to fix the issue at hand?
I can understand what you are saying, but this would be simply unacceptable. Im not sure on the international trading laws.

Here in the UK this could easily become a case for Trading Standards (Consumer Protection) as being 'Not Fit For Purpose' and if Apple were not to provide me with a satisfactory response, I believe they could be forced for compensation in some cases.
 
Last edited: