EMERGENCY! iMac HD is dying FOR SURE, and CONFIRMED!!! HELP!!!

Discussion in 'iMac' started by bluedoggiant, Dec 16, 2007.

  1. bluedoggiant macrumors 68030

    bluedoggiant

    Joined:
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    #1
    whenever the HD needs to be used, it makes the dreadful cricket sound, opening an app, yes, moving a file from desktop to folder or whatever, sound, song in itunes, sound, everything, i have my dad's Lacie HD, 250GB, i know for sure that im going to back up my stuff, just in case the HD dies before i get it to the store, but here is the thing, other than backing up my things, do i backup the libraries? if i need to also backup the libraries, i know that i am going to backup mine, and the one in the HD, but do i backup the library located here: Macintosh HD>System>library? do i have to backup all 3? is that necessary? im more worried than ever, this problem started 3 weeks ago, and now keeps on growing till today my imac is shows signs of dying, someone please tell me what to backup, im using my mbp now, im right here, with the thread open, so tell me please what to back up other than my user folder, there are 2 accounts on the system, one administrator, other me, standard, for get about the administrator account, that one is just there to do parental conrols for me (content filtering), but nevermind that!!!:(:(:(:(:(

    im going to schedule an appointment at the apple store, i called them to ask questions, i alse call apple care yesterday, i have the extended protection plan
     
  2. CalMin macrumors 6502a

    CalMin

    Joined:
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    #2
  3. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

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    #3
    Have you not been backing up on the Time Machine?
     
  4. Cave Man macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #4
    1. Buy a new drive suitable for your iMac. You'll need either a PATA or SATA, depending on the model you have. It should be as large as you have now, but larger if you can afford it.

    2. Buy this universal hard drive adapter and connect it to your new hard drive.

    3. Initialize the new drive. If you're iMac has an Intel processor, partition the drive as a single volume with the GUID option enabled using Disk Utility. If you don't do this, your Intel iMac will not boot.

    4. Download Carbon Copy Cloner and clone your failing drive to the new drive.

    5. Now you have a bootable clone of your hard drive. Test boot it by turning on your computer while holding the Option key, then select the new drive.

    6. Once you verify it works, transplant it into your iMac.
     
  5. bluedoggiant thread starter macrumors 68030

    bluedoggiant

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    #5
    no, no, no, please, i was asking if anybody knew what to backup other than my user directory & apps, but thanks for helping anyway, im uploading a video to youtube via imovie right now, right after thats finished, im shutting it down, so i need to know WHAT to back up other than my user directory:confused::confused::confused:

    nope, i was hoping on a 750GB HD this week, but right now im focused on my iMac, my dad has a 250GB HD that he doesnt use with time machine, he manually backs up his own things, and that is his pix, so i have the firewire 800 ready for backup, but right now im not sure what to backup OTHER than my user directory & apps!!!!

    uhh, there is no way im opening this computer up, i have a pretty good idea on how, but not taking risks, im just 14, im bringing it to the apple store before it dies, so i need to know what to backup other than my user directory, i dont want apps, hardware or anything, just what to backup other than my directory & apps, but thanks any way:eek::eek::eek:
     
  6. Cave Man macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #6
    Why don't you want to clone your drive? It's the easiest and most efficient way of resolving the problem. Otherwise, just drag and drop your user folders, but you will have real problems when you install the OS on your new drive - the links as user folders will have to be reestablished. It is far easier to use CCC.

    OK, that's a reasonable explanation. But at the very least, use CCC because then when you install the OS on the new drive you will be able to use Migration Assistant to restore your user folders and maintain the proper links. Believe me, this is the process that will save you from having lots of headaches.

    There's a lot more to your apps than just the apps. You have Library and System files associate with many, if not all, of them. Do yourself a favor and use CCC. It's very easy and free.
     
  7. bluedoggiant thread starter macrumors 68030

    bluedoggiant

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    #7
    but here is the thing, im bringing it into the apple store, if its not dead they will move everything to the new HD as if nothing happened, i just want to back up my own things just in case, and i dont have an extra HD laying around other than one from my computer thats 10 years old that i do not depend, and what does this app do?

    can i just backup the apps folder, the system folder, the library, and my user directory?? is that enough?? that is a total of 45.68 gigs
     
  8. Cave Man macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #8
    You won't have a bootable drive. Do you want to have to search through ten thousand files and copy them back over to the new drive if the geniuses fail? I sure have better things to do with my life, but then again, I'm not 14. :) I really, strongly, suggest you CCC your hard drive if you want to make life easy (if the geniuses screw up your files).

    Good luck - we've tried to help you.
     
  9. bluedoggiant thread starter macrumors 68030

    bluedoggiant

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    #9
    no, just copy it, not move it:eek:, and what does CCC do? i dont mind waiting to copy my files to the HD, then back when they fix it!:apple:, plus i have firewire 800, it should only take about an hour
     
  10. JNB macrumors 604

    JNB

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    #10
    CCC makes a clone (exact duplicate) of your drive, and you can boot drectly from it. SuperDuper! does the same thing, but the Leopard-compliant version hasn't been released yet, so I can't recommend that, unless you're still on 10.4.x.

    In the strongest possible terms, the recommendation to clone your drive is the best possible solution. It will completely save you from all potential problems & pitfalls as the internal drive replacement process progresses. Time, money, frustration are all amplified by simply trying to copy user settings, unless you like reinstalling apps and migrating a bunch of stuff.

    Any external USB or FW drive of sufficient capacity will suffice, as long as it's initially formatted as mentioned above (HFS+, GUID Partition Table).

    The only possible failure point in this is if the internal drive goes completely TU during the cloning process (which is also the case in any other limited copy scenario as well).

    Trust us on this one.
     
  11. bluedoggiant thread starter macrumors 68030

    bluedoggiant

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    #11
    so you are saying i should copy every single stinkin file from the HD to my external? like basically go to, in my case ahmed computer, and the two options are network, and well, HD, and i should drag it to my external? thats what ive been asking i do use leopard, and im not trusting 3rd party apps on this one, i guess i will go ahead and copy 49 gigs of files, and then if they replace the HD while its working and everything, and move the files, then i can just make sure everything is in its place and can delete it off my HD. is that your idea?
     
  12. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    #12
    I suggest only making a backup of your user directory. A clone is nice but you really want your personal stuff first.
     
  13. eyemacg5 macrumors 6502

    eyemacg5

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    #13
    Yes, make a bootable clone. It's the best and easiest way.
     
  14. bluedoggiant thread starter macrumors 68030

    bluedoggiant

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    #14
    and i bring it into the apple store for a replacement, and bring it back home with a new HD in it, there is nothing on the HD, now what?
     
  15. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    #15
    You should backup your computer before ever taking it to an Apple Store for repairs or shipping it back.
     
  16. bluedoggiant thread starter macrumors 68030

    bluedoggiant

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    #16
    i know, that, i have my backup on my external HD, and my imac is back home with a brand new HD with nothing on it, how do i put the stuff from my external, to the internal (i actually didnt back up yet, or bring in my imac, just asking for future notice)
     
  17. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    #17
    So what exactly did you backup then?
     
  18. DeaconGraves macrumors 65816

    DeaconGraves

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    #18
    1. There is no guarantee Apple will transfer your files.

    2. TRUST THE 3RD PARTY APPS. CCC works fine, and will do a better job of transferring anything than a simple drag and drop.
     
  19. bluedoggiant thread starter macrumors 68030

    bluedoggiant

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    #19
    nothing yet
     
  20. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    #20
    You should consider a slightly more chronological posting train of thought. It's rather confusing to help you.

    a. Create a bootable clone of the internal drive and clone it back when the computer returns repaired.

    b. Backup user files and restore them when the computer returns.

    Are there any other options that you'd like to cover?
     
  21. Big-TDI-Guy macrumors 68030

    Big-TDI-Guy

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2007
    #21
    Use Carbon Copy Cloner - the sooner you back up, the more likely you'll succeed.

    If you have the "Click of Death" - time is NOT on your side.

    I'd grab the MOST IMPORTANT files first - then attempt a full system backup. (If the read/write head is failing, or touching the platter - the more you use the HD, the faster it degrades / dies) So critical files first, then *attempt* to back up the entire disk via Carbon Copy Cloner.

    My .02

    Good Luck.
     
  22. JNB macrumors 604

    JNB

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Location:
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    #22
    Either you're not making yourself clear, or you just don't want to take some advice based on (hard-earned) experience. Please don't think we're talking down to you, but we just want to see that you don't follow a course of action that has significant downside potential. Even if the most limited ideas work, you still likely have a lot of app re-installation and file transfer left, regardless of what Apple or a repair center may tell you. Nobody will take responsibility for your data. Not Apple, not an Authorized Repair Center, nobody. If you don't back it up, it's not their problem if they can't restore it, or finish thrashing it for you.

    At the very least, use Backup and use the templates to back up your Home Folder and Personal Data & Settings. It has pre-defined scripts that do that. Remember though, that every access of the drive's data may be its last. Consequently, you want a plan that will ensure the highest amount of integrity possible.

    "Third-party" apps are perfectly good and trustworthy - Apple doesn't include every utility, application, or functionality that you need. CCC and SuperDuper! are cases in point. Apple has no equivalent to them. Cloning ensures you have everything you currently have on the drive, in perfect working order, allowing you to put in a naked new drive and clone back to the iMac - It'll be like nothing had changed (except you now have a good drive). "Drag & drop" will NOT duplicate your drive correctly.

    Best of luck to you!
     
  23. bluedoggiant thread starter macrumors 68030

    bluedoggiant

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    #23
    ok, im backing up the whole drive and ill bring it in as soon as i can, so far im fine
     
  24. peejack macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    #25
    You can open these things yourself???? :eek:
     

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