Employment in the USA

grandM

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Oct 14, 2013
1,100
56
I have a master degree in economics. I am 36 years old. Due to recession I winded up in teaching. I would rather never teach again. Would I be able to find a job in the usa? In Belgium (capital is Brussels Europe) HR does not want to hire me because I do not have experience in matters interesting me. So I want to start over.
 

yg17

macrumors G5
Aug 1, 2004
14,888
2,480
St. Louis, MO
Unless you're already a citizen, you can't just move to the USA and start applying for jobs. You would need a work visa, and the only way you'd get that is if an employer is sponsoring you.
 

grandM

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Oct 14, 2013
1,100
56
Unless you're already a citizen, you can't just move to the USA and start applying for jobs. You would need a work visa, and the only way you'd get that is if an employer is sponsoring you.
How does this sponsoring work
 

yg17

macrumors G5
Aug 1, 2004
14,888
2,480
St. Louis, MO
How does this sponsoring work
I have no idea. I'm a citizen so I've never had to deal with it. I just know you can't pack your bags, fly over here, and expect to be able to find work, chances are you'd get turned away at passport control at the airport if you told them that was your plan.
 

bradl

macrumors 601
Jun 16, 2008
4,006
11,823
You need to find a job and get hired first. Then they sponsor you to come over here and start working.
A friend of mine roughly 20 years ago ran into the catch-22 problem with this. Employers won't hire you until you get the visa, but you can't get the visa until an employee hires you.

What the OP needs to look into is either the H1-B Visa requirements, or residency requirements. The issue here is that employees have to see if there is no other resident or citizen who has applied for the job you have applied for has the same skills as you. If they do, they know they can hire them first, saving them the money for sponsoring you to move into the country, plus have the job.

If your qualifications are that outstanding, then you may beat out any other applicants; but there are a lot of factors that would go against that.

But look at both H-1B and residency requirements first. That may get you the planned route to go; you may find it easier to get residency, then apply for a job as a resident, bypassing all the issues with H1-B sponsoring.

BL.
 

grandM

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Oct 14, 2013
1,100
56
Are you a man from Brussels? Are you six-feet tall and full of muscles? :p

Anyway, stroll on over to the nearest U.S. Embassy or consulate and they'll be happy to provide the necessary information.
helas, no 6 feet tall or muscles
 

grandM

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Oct 14, 2013
1,100
56
A friend of mine roughly 20 years ago ran into the catch-22 problem with this. Employers won't hire you until you get the visa, but you can't get the visa until an employee hires you.

What the OP needs to look into is either the H1-B Visa requirements, or residency requirements. The issue here is that employees have to see if there is no other resident or citizen who has applied for the job you have applied for has the same skills as you. If they do, they know they can hire them first, saving them the money for sponsoring you to move into the country, plus have the job.

If your qualifications are that outstanding, then you may beat out any other applicants; but there are a lot of factors that would go against that.

But look at both H-1B and residency requirements first. That may get you the planned route to go; you may find it easier to get residency, then apply for a job as a resident, bypassing all the issues with H1-B sponsoring.

BL.
I think the outstanding part will be a problem. Education in Belgium is not good. It is enormously theoretical but not practical. I was a top student, graduated with great honors. So I could be an awesome asset if I was trained properly.

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You could find a US citizen to fall in love with, marry and work on getting here that way.
any good american dating sites
 

GoCubsGo

macrumors Nehalem
Feb 19, 2005
35,743
141
You could find a US citizen to fall in love with, marry and work on getting here that way.
There is probably an app or website for that too!
Are you a man from Brussels? Are you six-feet tall and full of muscles? :p

Anyway, stroll on over to the nearest U.S. Embassy or consulate and they'll be happy to provide the necessary information.
I lol'ed!

I think it is all outlined online too. Start here, maybe:
http://www.uscis.gov/working-united-states/working-us

helas, no 6 feet tall or muscles
Bad luck man, bad luck.
I think the outstanding part will be a problem. Education in Belgium is not good. It is enormously theoretical but not practical. I was a top student, graduated with great honors. So I could be an awesome asset if I was trained properly.
The point is that you would need to be trained. Sponsorship is usually offered if you come ready-made, so to speak. It is not easy, not even a little. I've been through the process with someone and in spite of bringing something to the table, sponsorship became impossible.
 

grandM

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Oct 14, 2013
1,100
56
Any citizen will do. After all, you could easily just choose to be attracted to them.
any good american dating site

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There is probably an app or website for that too!

I lol'ed!

I think it is all outlined online too. Start here, maybe:
http://www.uscis.gov/working-united-states/working-us


Bad luck man, bad luck.


The point is that you would need to be trained. Sponsorship is usually offered if you come ready-made, so to speak. It is not easy, not even a little. I've been through the process with someone and in spite of bringing something to the table, sponsorship became impossible.
That is indeed chicken/egg. I do not see a belgian firm investing in people. They have a broad offer of experienced people.
 

b.kane

macrumors newbie
Oct 9, 2014
1
0
Why bother with all that. Just fly to Mexico and walk. That's what everyone else does.
 

Tomorrow

macrumors 604
Mar 2, 2008
7,118
1,246
Always a day away
I have a master degree in economics. I am 36 years old.
<snip>
I want to start over.
You could probably do just fine. I imagine there are plenty of econ grads working in all kinds of fields, some maybe even in economics.

Starting over at 36 is something I'm not sure *I* would be willing to do but hey, at least you sound like one of the motivated ones. Hope everything works out for you.
 

grandM

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Oct 14, 2013
1,100
56
You could probably do just fine. I imagine there are plenty of econ grads working in all kinds of fields, some maybe even in economics.

Starting over at 36 is something I'm not sure *I* would be willing to do but hey, at least you sound like one of the motivated ones. Hope everything works out for you.
Is the job market good for econ grads in the usa? Is it still possible to work yourself up there? In Belgium HR does NOT allow to start over. The job market is also flooded with experienced people.
 

63dot

macrumors 603
Jun 12, 2006
5,271
339
norcal
Is the job market good for econ grads in the usa? Is it still possible to work yourself up there? In Belgium HR does NOT allow to start over. The job market is also flooded with experienced people.
The fact that you have a master's degree can't hurt. I don't ever hear econ as one of the good majors out there, but at least you have that six years of college education and that has to open a few doors even if not in your field.

I often hear the same complaint in not finding related work with history majors, English majors, anthropology majors, etc but none complain that the education was a waste of time. Some employers out here at least have to see your econ master's as sort of a master's in business and there are plenty of businesses out here.
 

grandM

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Oct 14, 2013
1,100
56
The fact that you have a master's degree can't hurt. I don't ever hear econ as one of the good majors out there, but at least you have that six years of college education and that has to open a few doors even if not in your field.

I often hear the same complaint in not finding related work with history majors, English majors, anthropology majors, etc but none complain that the education was a waste of time. Some employers out here at least have to see your econ master's as sort of a master's in business and there are plenty of businesses out here.
Well my master is in Applied Economics. So I did not major in aspects of government or so. It was meant for business, but hopeless theoretical.
 

grandM

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Oct 14, 2013
1,100
56
It was said as a joke. I hope you're not seriously considering marrying someone just for the citizenship.
Never know I would find a good match there. Believe me, I want to work there, not profit from society.
 

Tomorrow

macrumors 604
Mar 2, 2008
7,118
1,246
Always a day away
Is the job market good for econ grads in the usa? Is it still possible to work yourself up there?
I work in engineering, so I'm not too terribly familiar with the market for econ majors - but as some others have mentioned, I don't hear a lot of buzz about it as a hot career.

As far as working yourself up - yes, it's entirely possible, but starting fresh at age 36 isn't generally the best way to do it, unfortunately.