Engadget says smartwatch is established produt category

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by Rogifan, Nov 7, 2014.

  1. Rogifan macrumors P6

    Rogifan

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2011
    #1
    http://www.engadget.com/2014/11/04/lg-g-watch-r-review/

    I'm not sure what Engadget is smoking but the only places where "smartwatches" were the "hot new thing" were on tech sites like Engadget. I think it's ridiculous to say this is an established category in 2014. Wearable technology is still incredibly nascent and it remains to be seen whether consumers will say "this is great" or "no thanks".
     
  2. Piggie macrumors 604

    Piggie

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    #2
    I agree with you.

    Whilst I genuinely belief the long term future is in wearable tech, I think we have a long long way to go yet, the technology has probably a few more decades to go yet before it's something normal people have attached to them all the time.

    How does it attach, where and how a part of you can it become?

    Perhaps surgical ish ?

    Speaker wise that's no problem, things can vibrate bones in your ear already, so that's pretty much done, speaking into something is a challenge and seeing something an even bigger challenge.

    The Apple watch, whilst great, it still really just a very very old take on a small computer, just scaled down, just a bit of evolution in scale, not much more. We need a jump really.
     
  3. matrix07 macrumors 68040

    matrix07

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    #3
    I'm ALWAYS not sure what Engadget are smoking. :p
     
  4. 2macORnot2mac macrumors regular

    2macORnot2mac

    Joined:
    May 14, 2010
    #4
    How can it be established when they're all horrible and the Awatch hasn't been seen by the masses yet.
     
  5. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #5
    This seems just as misguided as saying "the MP3 player category is an established product" or "tablet computers are an established product category" before the iPod or iPad.

    B
     
  6. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2007
    Location:
    New Sanfrakota
    #6
    That reminds me of some people asking why Apple was getting into the MP3 player market when they claimed it was an established product category :rolleyes:
     
  7. Piggie macrumors 604

    Piggie

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    #7
    Well, they used great tech to make a product far better technically than others and they did great, and deserved to do so.
    Back then other companies were getting lazy and dragging their feet.

    I would suggest, we live in a rather different world now.
    Other companies got their asses kicked and have learned the hard way.

    We're no longer in a world where Apple uses the latest cutting edge products to deliver things others cannot.
    In fact they often use safer more established tech, and are now instead focusing on integration of their product range, as opposed to the device itself.

    The whole thing is really going to revolve around the question of, do the mass population want to go back to wearing watches, as not they have got used to, over the past XX years of carrying and using their phones for almost everything.

    Do people want to have to worry about a second device, when the one they have does it all?

    Not even Apple knows this. Give it 5 to 10 years and we will all know. :)
     
  8. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2007
    Location:
    New Sanfrakota
    #8
    Used to? Let's see. Smartwatches aren't even mainstreamed and contactless pay hasn't really taken off.
     
  9. Rogifan thread starter macrumors P6

    Rogifan

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2011
    #9
    What a load of BS. Name me one product in the Jobs 2.0 era that the media or tech press said was "better technically" than the competition? Never happened. Competitor products always had better specs (on paper at least), more features, etc. And there was always something that was going to be an Apple killer. Plus in the early 2000s Gartner said Apple should stop making hardware and just license OS X because they were never going to be able to complete with companies like Dell. This idea that the competition sucked (apparently up until Steve Jobs died) but doesn't anymore is pure BS.
     
  10. Piggie macrumors 604

    Piggie

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    #10
    Well to be fair.

    Other countries have had NFC / contactless payments for years, and smart watches of various brands and models have been out for years.

    Apple does not even have 1 for sale yet.

    I'm sure Apple will do well, albeit in a limited way as they can only sell to those with a modern Apple phone, and they don't work with the majority of phones the general population own.

    I'm sure there will be excellent initial sales figures, but it will be a very slow burn after that.
     
  11. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2007
    Location:
    New Sanfrakota
    #11
    I should have said contactless payment via phone. The current crop of smart watches of various brands and models suck, just like the MP3 players before the iPod.
     
  12. Piggie macrumors 604

    Piggie

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    #12
    Yes, that is what I am saying.
    I'm probably talking further back than you think I am.

    I am just sad in general when I look around Computer/high tech gadget stores at the Damage Steve Jobs has done to the proper computing industry. I'm just so glad he's gone so hopefully over years the damage may gradually be un-done, but I worry it's too late :(

    I watched the computing industry grow for so many years, and in just a very short time he probably did the most damage any one man has done to the entire computing industry ever :(

    And yes, I'm fully aware you will totally disagree with this, and that's fine, as we all have our own views.
     
  13. fisha macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    #13
    I can understand where you are coming from ... and to an extent, the Jobs effect (for lack of a better way of putting it) has taken focus away from computing tech spec ... which in turn has damaged the computing industry.

    But then again, I think it was destined for that route anyway ... As I grew up as a kid, 286, 386, 486, Pentium, etc etc rolled out and computer industry was fantastic to follow (imho) ... each new release really brought newer, faster more powerful features that genuinely made a difference to the average user in terms of what the computer could do. But even i realised that come the Intel Core era (very roughly), just about any computer you bought including the cheapest laptop from a supermarket would be able to do the job that average joe would want it to do (Web, Office, Facebook etc). The advance of technology spec beyond what people consider adequate would make little difference to the bulk of buyers.

    With that in mind, where do you go? ... its natural to drift over to improving the usability, making the tech more desirable etc ... and in that regard, Apple is certainly due credit. Tech spec aside, Apple brought a consistent, cohesive, usable and desirable set of products.

    In hindsight, Apple weren't the only ones that saw this ... I remember working in IBM at the times they were selling off the laptop and desktop lines and focusing more on services. I couldn't understand why, but in hindsight, perhaps it was good strategic vision, considering as you say the computing industry has changed so much.

    - - - - - - - -

    As for the original post, I do think the smart watch could be considered an established product category. The products are falling into a pretty close genre of features and abilities at this time. If company Z were to release a 'smart watch', your average person would have a good idea of what it would generally (or should) be able to do. That to me makes it an established category.
     
  14. samcraig macrumors P6

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2009
    #14
    Not sure I agree with you as I have seen several publications tout 2014 as the year wearables are hot - esp leading up to this holiday season. By the time Apple releases their watch - the wearables market will be even more established.

    But ultimately what does it matter if it's established or not? Bragging rights?
     
  15. Rogifan thread starter macrumors P6

    Rogifan

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2011
    #15
    Established based on what? Sales figures? I don't think so. I think it will be years before we can call this an established category. Even fitness bands are a niche market for the most part. When I go to the gym I rarely see anyone wearing a band on their wrist.
     
  16. samcraig macrumors P6

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2009
    #16
    Well then - let's all go by Rogifan's definition of established. You're asking based on? If you don't have criteria - how can you determine it isn't established yet.

    Who decides that? Clearly - several publications I've read have stated that it's been established. I have no idea what criteria they are using either. But it seems subjective anyway.

    Regardless - back to my other point. What difference does it really make? Bragging rights?
     
  17. Zwhaler macrumors 603

    Zwhaler

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2006
    #17
    How is it not an established product category? It is a product, and it has its own category. The only thing debatable is "established", however, despite that when someone says I'm interested in purchasing a smartwatch they are undoubtedly referring to a product category. If it isn't established now, it ought to be with the Apple watch release.
     
  18. Rogifan thread starter macrumors P6

    Rogifan

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2011
    #18
    This is the definition of "established" from Google:

    In my mind smartwatches don't fit that definition. Unless Engadget meant established as in initiated, but I didn't see it that way.
     
  19. Zwhaler macrumors 603

    Zwhaler

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2006
    #19
    Good point. I guess a "long time" in the tech world is really short these days. They probably mean established as in it is firmly situated as being pursued by multiple manufacturers and therefore isn't going to die out short lived, like some early speculative technology.
     
  20. tkermit macrumors 68030

    tkermit

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    #20
    And MP3 players were already a lot more popular in 2001 than smartwatches are now. I don't know anyone that isn't a tech geek and is wearing a smartwatch.
     
  21. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2007
    Location:
    New Sanfrakota
    #21
    I didn't know anyone who had a MP3 player in 2001 (at least before the iPod debuted).
     
  22. matrix07 macrumors 68040

    matrix07

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    #22
    I really like John's argument.

     
  23. Rogifan thread starter macrumors P6

    Rogifan

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2011
    #23
    Yep. Hence why I think it's silly to say it's an established category. Smart watches haven't been around for a long time and we don't know if they will ever be generally excepted by consumers a large.
     
  24. mtmac macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2012
    #24
    Wow. The most influential man in the history of computing doing so much damage to the industry? I could understand if this was a MacPro forum obsessing about the the infatuation Apple has with iToys, but this is a watch forum. If you're so worried about the "proper computing industry" why are you a mainstay of the watch forum? Remember how bad the Scully years were; emulating Microsoft?

    Jobs and Apple's whole philosophy has and is getting technology to the masses, not just IT guys. It only makes sense the direction Apple has taken. While still making some of the best workstation computers, Apple now has integrated computer tech into ordinary devises that outperform the products it has displaced. The man who founded a garage-based company and took it to the most profitable company in the world and brought computing to so many is the person you think most damaged the computer industry? You and Samsung may be happy he's dead, but you are alone. There is not one person more responsible for the success of the computer industry than Steve Jobs.

    So you hope the damage he's done will be undone? So let's get rid of smart watches, music players, tablets, phones; hell even laptops aren't proper computers. Apple, please go back to the old MacPro design but bigger and uglier, but get rid of the GUI, as is hard to be an elitist if everyone can do it.

    Steve Jobs was to the computer industry what Henry Ford was to the auto industry. Visionaries that brought their products to the masses, creating a mass market where it didn't previously exist. While Ford continues to produce cars, Apple continues to innovate into new products and categories. They didn't get to be the richest company in the world because they had the most damaging person in the computing industry at the helm.
     
  25. mtmac macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2012
    #25
    To say it's "no longer the "hot new thing"" is absurd. However with so many manufacturers and now Apple entering the market with this wide array of product choices signifies that it is an established product category. What is out now is insignificant compared to the impact the Apple watch will have over the next few generations. So while established product category may seem premature do to lack of sales, with so many companies producing so many products and committing to multiple versions, success is imminent. There's too much potential and so many companies behind it for the entire category to fail. What remains to be seen is how big the category is, however the category exists and will continue to do so.
     

Share This Page