Engagement Photo Advice

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by thouts, May 18, 2009.

  1. thouts macrumors regular

    thouts

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    #1
    Hello,

    Two of my friends are getting married this coming fall and they've both asked me to take engagement photos for them this summer. I've seen some of these types of photos before and have been searching the web for examples. We live in a northwestern ohio farm town to give an idea of the surroundings.

    I'm just looking for ideas, advice, or recommendations from those of you with experience - type of lens, camera settings, time of day, locations, success stories, failures...thanks!
     
  2. kornyboy macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2004
    Location:
    Knoxville, TN (USA)
    #2
    Wirelessly posted (iPhone: Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 2_2_1 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/525.18.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/3.1.1 Mobile/5H11 Safari/525.20)

    Use either early morning or in the evening. Just after sunrise or just before sunset. The light is really nice those times of day.
    For a place find a nice tree, field, or stream (or all three). Basically, treat it like you would a nice portrait.

    Hope this helps. I'm no pro photographer but these are somethings that I've used to get some really nice shots in the past.
     
  3. ftaok macrumors 601

    ftaok

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Location:
    East Coast
    #3
    thouts,

    I can share with you my experience for my engagement photos.

    1. We asked our photographer to take some of the shots at/nearby where I proposed to my wife. Since that's where the engagement officially began, we thought it would be nice to revisit the setting where it began. Fortunately, I proposed at a park in the city (philly) and getting shots was not a problem.

    2. We also shot at different locations throughout the city that day. One location was in the middle of Broad Street (if you're familiar with Philadelphia). This is actually a common location for wedding/engagement photos.

    3. Another location was the Rodin Museum. Lots of interesting sculptures to serve as backdrops. Just don't use "The Gates of Hell" as a backdrop.

    One last thing. It rained heavily during our wedding. I'm talking a near-monsoon. So we didn't get the opportunity to take outdoor photos during our wedding day ... so the engagement photos meant that much more to us. Sure, the wedding party wasn't there and we weren't wearing the tux/dress, but it was cool anyways.

    Good luck.
     
  4. thouts thread starter macrumors regular

    thouts

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    #4
    thanks, good comments so far! keep them coming.
     
  5. wheelhot macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2007
    #5
    Hmm, here is a suggestion, go to the venue you will be taking the engagement photos and start practicing shooting there cause from what I learn from a photography workshop, what you imagine isn't necessary what you will get after the shot was taken, so go to the venue and spend time there taking some photos and if possible have a friend around so you can practice taking him/her photo and get the best possible setting and when you are back home, start going through the photos and see what can be improved so when the engagement day arrives, you got a rough idea what to do ;)

    All the best and enjoy.
     
  6. ftaok macrumors 601

    ftaok

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Location:
    East Coast
    #6
    One other thing ... not sure what your experience level is with shooting people.

    To eliminate double chins, have the subject stick their head forward a bit. This will pull the neck tight and make the image look better. Try this technique out a little before using it, otherwise it might make for awkward poses.

    ft
     
  7. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #7
    The most important thing about getting good engagement or wedding shots is trying to capture the emotion/connection between the couple. This is usually best done when they are relaxed and interacting well. Set up your shoot in a way that helps them feel natural and make it fun. It doesn't matter how good your equipment or how perfect your lighting is if they look stiff or feel nervous. You know the kind of pictures I'm talking about and none of you will be happy with them. Before hand, ask him or her to tell you some stories about their relationship. Help them "get in the mood" by thinking about what they love about each other. If they are friends of yours then you have an advantage because there is already an existing relationship and you already know some history. Best of luck and enjoy.
     
  8. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #8
    Fill flash outdoors, drag the shutter indoors.
     

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