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In February, Seattle-based law firm Pfau Cochran Vertetis Amala (PCVA) brought a class action lawsuit against Apple over the "Error 53" bug, which bricked iPhone 6 models with select third-party components. Apple quickly responded, confirming the error and issuing an updated version of iOS 9.2.1 to fix the error. Earlier this month, Apple moved to dismiss an amended version of the class action lawsuit. However, PCVA and the plaintiffs have now moved to keep the lawsuit alive, according to AppleInsider.

touchid.jpg

Apple argued the lawsuit should be dismissed because the company issued a fix for the error and offered to reimburse customers who had paid to have their devices replaced or repaired. However, the plaintiffs are now arguing that Apple failed to properly alert users to the reimbursement program. They argue the "vague" announcement on Apple's website and a support document published in April isn't sufficient enough to inform affected customers.

The plaintiffs also claim having trouble in getting touch with Apple about reimbursement, with one plaintiff claiming they were never sent a reimbursement notice and another saying they were disconnected from Apple support twice when trying to contact the Cupertino company about the program.

The controversy first started in February, when users who had their iPhone 6 models repaired by third-party technicians were seeing the mysterious "Error 53" that bricked their phones. The error showed up when devices had parts replaced with components not sourced from the original device, with the not-matching components affecting the Touch ID fingerprint sensor and causing iOS to fail Touch ID validation checks.

Several law firms considered suits against Apple, but PCVA brought its forward. The parties will meet in a motion hearing on June 16.

Article Link: 'Error 53' Plaintiffs Criticize Apple's Reimbursement Effort, Aim to Keep Lawsuit Alive
 

NickD73

macrumors regular
Jan 21, 2013
120
431
Arizona
This house of cards is going to collapse soon. Shares will be in the $50s by this time next year.
 
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theheadguy

macrumors 65816
Apr 26, 2005
1,140
1,367
california
I follow Apple pretty closely and the reimbursement is news to me. The average customer screwed out of money wouldn't have a clue about the reimbursement.
 
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Nramos33

macrumors newbie
Aug 16, 2014
26
27
They were disconnected after multiple attempts?

How much do you want to bet they were dicks about it?

Here's how I imagine it happening.

"I was charged $129 to replace my screen and it was ********. You should never have charged me...blah blah blah"

"I understand sir, do you mind if you give me a second to...(interrupted)"

"I do mind, I want the fixed now!!!"

"I understand that, it will just take take me a second to review this. Do you mind if I put you on a short hold."

Lots of arguing by customer...

*disconnect*
 
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omihek

macrumors 6502a
May 3, 2014
551
1,651
Salt Lake City, UT
Um... am I missing something? Why are they suing Apple? If they really feel the need to sue someone shouldn't they be suing the "third-party technicians" for installing faulty parts? So confused...
 
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smacrumon

macrumors 68030
Jan 15, 2016
2,683
4,010
This could've been all avoided if Apple just ensured that it's software release was suitable and fit for purpose. It clearly wasn't and now Apple is enduring the consequences of broken software pushed out to users. One would think that Apple would have learnt from this experience but clearly it hasn't with its most recent releases.

This is why I'm completely reluctant to install any new software from Apple.

Apple charges customers a premium as if it is industry perfection, but it clearly isn't through experience.

Pay compensation properly Apple and move on to your next big project. Customers are everything Apple, treat them properly, be completely proactive by helping customers.

Can you imagine if Apple pushed a software update that was buggy to one of its future automobiles? Something mission-critical like that with some software that bricks when driving. It could be catastrophic. That's why Apple needs to get this quality up to par and learn these lessons now.
[doublepost=1464156257][/doublepost]
Um... am I missing something? Why are they suing Apple? If they really feel the need to sue someone shouldn't they be suing the "third-party technicians" for installing faulty parts? So confused...
It's the software that's rendering the products useless.
 
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Col4bin

macrumors 68000
Oct 2, 2011
1,734
1,291
El Segundo
See, all the more reason to lose that outdated home button. (Semi-serious). Because without it, none of these shenanigans would be possible. (Sarcasm).
 
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C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
51,388
19,440
This could've been all avoided if Apple just ensured that it's software release was suitable and fit for purpose. It clearly wasn't and now Apple is enduring the consequences of broken software pushed out to users. One would think that Apple would have learnt from this experience but clearly it hasn't with its most recent releases.

This is why I'm completely reluctant to install any new software from Apple.

Apple charges customers a premium as if it is industry perfection, but it clearly isn't through experience.

Pay compensation properly Apple and move on to your next big project.

Customers are everything Apple, treat them properly, be completely proactive by helping customers.
[doublepost=1464156257][/doublepost]
It's the software that's rendering the products useless.
Essentially no such thing as bug-free software, in particular on the level of an OS.
 
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smacrumon

macrumors 68030
Jan 15, 2016
2,683
4,010
Essentially no such thing as bug-free software, in particular on the level of an OS.
Well not really. I can write an app that is completed free of bugs. The chance of bugs being introduced as the app gets larger does increase. However we are not just talking about a simple little bug here we are talking about a complete catastrophic failure of an OS rendering a device completely failed.
 
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m4rc

macrumors 6502
Sep 15, 2003
484
191
UK
This house of cards is going to collapse soon. Shares will be in the $50s by this time next year.

Apple is doomed, the end is nigh! Blah blah blah for the bast 20 years.......


I'm going back to sleep, poke me when you have something original to say.
 
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I7guy

macrumors Penryn
Nov 30, 2013
25,908
14,179
Gotta be in it to win it
Well not really. I can write an app that is completed free of bugs. The chance of bugs being introduced as the app gets larger does increase. However we are not just talking about a simple little bug here we are talking about a complete catastrophic failure of an OS rendering a device completely failed.
Never had a BSOD or got your boot sector borked?
 
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SMIDG3T

Suspended
Apr 29, 2012
3,859
2,316
England
They patched the bug AND offered replacements. That's great service by Apple in my opinion but, of course, all they want is money.
 
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Napalm Doctor

macrumors member
Oct 16, 2015
51
38
Canada
No, the iPhones fixed by third party should be bricked when parts are replaced with not approved ones. The best example is that case. By putting an inferior Touch ID sensor, the third party repair is lowering the security of the phone there opening a huge hole in security. It is mostly for security reason and I agree with a concept trying to protect my infos.
 
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69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,809
14,819
In between a rock and a hard place
Um... am I missing something? Why are they suing Apple? If they really feel the need to sue someone shouldn't they be suing the "third-party technicians" for installing faulty parts? So confused...
The parts weren't faulty. The software was. That's why Apple was able to patch in a fix. As for the lawsuit, it's just lawyers being lawyers. They see a potential payday slipping through their fingers and they're grasping a little more tightly to see if they can get something for nothing.
 
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ZipZap

macrumors 603
Dec 14, 2007
5,796
1,099
Lets be clear, Apple did not respond quickly and did not try to resolve this matter before the lawsuit forced the issue. In fact, Apple denied then tried to claim error 53 was to protect customers.
 
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