Ethernet splitter or switch?

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by slipper, Nov 18, 2010.

  1. slipper macrumors 68000

    slipper

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    #1
    From my understanding, the difference between an Ethernet splitter and a switch is that a switch gives the two devices separate IP addresses whereas the splitter does not. Is this correct?

    I need to get either a splitter or switch for my LG TV and WD TV. Is a cheap Ethernet splitter from deal extreme sufficient? Or will i need to spend some cash on a switch?
     
  2. imaketouchtheme macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    #2
    You need a router. A switch does not assign IP address (unless you pay for more than 1 IP address from your ISP).

    A router will assign internal IP addresses to each device connected.
     
  3. slipper thread starter macrumors 68000

    slipper

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    #3
    I realize that, but do i really need two IP addresses for my WD TV and LG TV? What could possibly go wrong if they share one? I will either be watching Youtube or Netflix from my LG TV or streaming movies from my WD TV, but both LG TV and WD TV shouldn't be streaming information at the same time.
     
  4. imaketouchtheme macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    #4
    You would then have to reset your switch and grant internet access to whichever device everytime you wanted to switch which one was online...;)
     
  5. GimmeSlack12 macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #5
    Something tells me a lot could go wrong. Not from a permanent damage standpoint but from an annoying and not working standpoint. I guess if the splitters are cheap (less than $10) than at least give it a shot, but just get a router.
     
  6. Darth.Titan macrumors 68030

    Darth.Titan

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #6
    Every device on a network needs it's own IP address. Neither an Ethernet splitter nor a switch can distribute IP addresses. You need a router.
     
  7. imaketouchtheme macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    #7
    I think I've clearly stated that in two different fashions.

    But thanks for reinforcing the enforced.

    :D
     
  8. steve2112 macrumors 68040

    steve2112

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    Location:
    East of Lyra, Northwest of Pegasus
    #8
    What could go wrong? Collisions. If two devices have the same IP address, they will both try sending traffic out, which will cause collisions on your network and slow down traffic. Ethernet sends out traffic even if you aren't actively using it. If you look at most non-Mac computers (Macs don't put lights over their ethernet ports), you will see the ethernet light blinking even if you aren't currently using the device. This indicates traffic is being generated. A splitter does the same thing as an old hub, in that it is shared media. The problem is that 1) attached devices don't get the full bandwidth because they are sharing it, and 2) If both devices generate traffic at the same time, it will cause a collision. When this happens, one will back off and stop transmitting all is clear. This slows you down.

    The best thing to do is just spring for a switch. Many modern DSL/cable modems can do internal DHCP and assign IP addresses to stuff on your internal network. My 6 year old DSL modem was capable of generating DHCP addresses. If you already have a router, then it can handle DHCP for you. If you don't have a router or an all-in-one modem/router, you need a router since it will also function as a firewall.
     
  9. CylonGlitch macrumors 68030

    CylonGlitch

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Location:
    SoCal
    #9
    If he has a router, all he would need is a cheap switch.
    http://www.amazon.com/MT-ES108-8-Ports-Ethernet-Network-Switch/dp/B0042A9M3K
    (If he assigns his own IP addresses, he doesn't need a router)

    But if he needs a router, there are cheap ones as well :
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-list...290181535&sr=1-3&seller=&colid=&condition=new

    No need to be even MORE cheap.
     
  10. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

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    Sep 15, 2006
    Location:
    New York City, NY
    #10
  11. slipper thread starter macrumors 68000

    slipper

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    #11
    Sorry folks. I completely forgot to mention the fact than i am using a Linksys WRT54Gv4 wireless router. I want to have a wired line going to my LG LED TV and WD TV Media player.
     
  12. flynz4 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #12
    Your router assigns a different IP address to every device on your network. You do not need another router.

    You can run two wires from your existing router... one to the TV and the other two the Media Player.

    If that is impractical... you can run one wire... connect it to a switch near the devices... and then connect your TV and your Media Player to the switch.

    /Jim
     
  13. slipper thread starter macrumors 68000

    slipper

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    #13
    I know this is probably a dumb question, but would it be ok if i use one of these? I know, i'm cheap. :D
     
  14. pastrychef, Nov 23, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2010

    pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Location:
    New York City, NY
    #14
    Should work fine. It's basically the same thing that I linked to. But, remember, you won't be able to get gigabit speeds with a splitter. If memory serves me correctly, you will be limited to 10 and 100Base-T speeds with a splitter. Also, remember you're going to need one one each end.
     
  15. flynz4 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #15
    No.. you cannot split an ethernet signal. What you want is a switch. They are cheap.

    Read the replies to the product you posted. All of them said it doesn't work.

    /Jim
     
  16. cluthz macrumors 68040

    cluthz

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2004
    Location:
    Norway
    #16
    Doesn't the WRT54G have built in switch with 4 ethernet ports, at least mine has, but i have v7 and not v4.
     
  17. pastrychef, Nov 24, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2010

    pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Location:
    New York City, NY
    #17
    You must've missed my posts. It is possible to split an ethernet cable to accommodate two devices. The reason this works is because 10/100Base-T only uses half of the eight leads of the ethernet port/cable.

    If the ethernet is in-wall, it may be more aesthetically pleasing to split a cable at the ends than to run another cable that won't be in-wall. There are no disadvantages if your equipment only have 10/100Base-T ports. While you can add a switch or hub at the end, that adds another piece of hardware and, along with it, the need for another outlet (and, very possibly, a wall wart power adaptor) and use of electricity.
     

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