Etiquette - Thank You Gift

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by velocityg4, Nov 14, 2016.

  1. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2004
    Location:
    Georgia
    #1
    I received a thank you card from a customer recently. Which also included a gift card.

    I am uncertain what proper etiquette would dictate. I've read that simply acknowledging it is correct the next time I see them. Otherwise it becomes a cycle of thank you for the thank you.

    However, I may not see them for again for months or even over a year. I don't want them to think I am unappreciative, by not responding. I occasionally get tips or gifts but it is always from clients at the time I see them, so I can thank them immediately.

    I rarely check my mail so it was at least three weeks after they sent it that I opened it. A couple more as I kept putting it off. Wanting to avoid the awkwardness of it all. So a phone call seems a bit belated.

    I wrote a you're welcome letter. It just seems odd to actually send it. As does a thank you for a thank you.

    Letter sample. Names have been altered.

    Dear Mortimer and Clarice Griswald,

    You're welcome, the gift card is much appreciated. I will put it to good use. It is heartening to hear you were so well pleased with my work.

    With appreciation,

    Sancho Panza
     
  2. yaxomoxay macrumors 68000

    yaxomoxay

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Location:
    Texas
    #2
    Dear Mortimer and Clarice Griswald,

    It is heartening to hear you were so well pleased with my work, I look forward to do more business with you. The gift card is much appreciated. I will put it to good use.

    With appreciation,

    Sancho Panza
    [/QUOTE]
     
  3. Scepticalscribe, Nov 14, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #3
    Instead of squirming with embarrassment, I'd insert a sentence at the beginning of your reply along the lines of 'Apologies for not getting back to you earlier, but I hadn't checked my mail for a while & thus, hadn't realised that you had very kindly sent me this much appreciated gift card. I will put it to good use....' etc.

    That - or something similar - should cover everything that needs to be said; it explains the delay (because they will have wondered whether you did, in fact, actually receive the gift token) and makes it quite clear that you have received the gift token and are now taking the opportunity to thank them for it.
     
  4. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2015
    Location:
    Boston
    #4
    I think you need to look past the point that their gift was a thank you. If you send a thank you note they're not going to send you a thank you note in return. I think a thank you note would be the most appropriate form of communication.

    As other have stated, simply thank them for the gift and note your appreciation for them as a client, in addition to a brief apology for the delay due to not checking your mailbox. Close with a comment about how you look forward to future business with them as customers.

    My only other thought is to determine if this gift is appropriate in the first place. If you're in a position where it would be unethical to accept gifts or your company does not allow it, then you should kindly turn down the gift and return it.

    For example, if you're a landscaper there is no conflict. If you work for a company bidding out contracts, then you need to reflect on if it's okay to be accepting that gift.
     
  5. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #5
    Sound advice.

    Or, if accepting a gift, perhaps to privately question just exactly what manner of gift is appropriate for the circumstances.

    Small gifts - as an expression of appreciation - such as a token, chocolates, a bottle of wine - will rarely contravene ethical guidelines. Large gifts carry their own warning.
     

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