Expanding the hard drive space on VMWare Fusion

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by theapplefreak, Aug 15, 2008.

  1. theapplefreak macrumors regular

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    #1
    As you can see in the title, I want to know how to expand the hard drive space on VMWare Fusion. I've installed Windows XP Professional on VMWare and I put a hard drive space of 5 GB which was really small and I want to expand it to 10GB. I've read some ways of doing them, but they are long and complicated. Need help
    Thanks
     
  2. Dmac77 macrumors 68020

    Dmac77

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    #2
    Is this a complete VM install of XP? Or is VMWare looking at a bootcamp partition for XP? I can help you more if I know that Info.

    Don
     
  3. theapplefreak thread starter macrumors regular

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    #3
    Yes. Its a complete VM install of XP.
     
  4. sapporobaby macrumors 68000

    sapporobaby

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    #4
    Complicated for sure

    There is no easy way to do it. It can be done but it is complicated. The fastest and easiest way is to start over from scratch and do a new install. I too have this problem but I am too lazy to go through the hassle.
     
  5. Dmac77 macrumors 68020

    Dmac77

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    #5
    Ok, there should be a button that says preferences on the VMWare window, click that, and then from there, click the HDD button on the left hand side. There should be an option to expand the HDD size in that panel, that's how it is on my iMac at least. If it's not there, I'm at a loss.

    EDIT: Just found this article there is a PDF attachment at the bottom of the first post, that might be helpful. http://communities.vmware.com/message/690626#690626

    Don
     
  6. theapplefreak thread starter macrumors regular

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    #6
    There is no preference button on the VMWare Window. But I have clicked on the virtual machine and clicked settings. I looked at the left hand side and went to Hard Drive, but its all grayed out
     
  7. Dmac77 macrumors 68020

    Dmac77

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    #7
    I was able to do it from a pref. pane in VMWare. Why am I always different:confused:

    EDIT: To OP, you may be better of just doing a reinstall, and then contact M$FT, and telling them that you put in a new graphics card, they will give you a new key.

    Don
     
  8. sapporobaby macrumors 68000

    sapporobaby

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    #8
    Your solution will not work as you can not easily change a partition size once it is set. It says this on the VMWare site. Choices are: reinstall or do it the hard way which could lead to more problems and ultimately a reinstall.
     
  9. theapplefreak thread starter macrumors regular

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    #9
    Ok. I guess thats the easiest way. By the way. What is the recommended hard drive size for the Virtual Machine?
     
  10. mrwizardno2 macrumors 6502a

    mrwizardno2

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    #10
    Far from it. it's much easier to just expand the disk. Sure, you have to do it via terminal, but it takes almost no time at all.

    you'll need to use Terminal to run a command line utility called vmware-vdiskmanager in /Library/Application\ Support/VMWare\ Fusion/. You pass it a switch, a value, and your vmdk file and it does the rest. It can't resize the partition on the disk, but it can make the disk larger.

    So if you wanted to make XP.vmdk a 20 gigabyte disk, you'd execute this "./vmware-vdiskmanager -x 20 /path/to/XP.vmdk"

    When I get home, I'll make you a guide. You need this in a hurry? Or do you have a couple of hours?
     
  11. sapporobaby macrumors 68000

    sapporobaby

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    #11
    I read this technique on several VMware sites and they said this is possible but there is an inherent danger. Considering that you are very comfortable with this, you might be able to do this rather easily but not many are comfortable with using the Terminal app.

    Can you post that guide here so others can have a look at it?
     
  12. mrwizardno2 macrumors 6502a

    mrwizardno2

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    #12
    the only danger I can think of would be corruption of the disk image. in that case a quick copy would provide you with a cheap, effective backup.

    there really is no reason to be afraid of using terminal. it's just a different interface to the same things you interact with via the UI. And if you're logged on as a normal user, and attempt to follow the directions given - there should be no problems. Now, go typing random junk in there, yeah - that might be an issue. but if you are determined, intelligent, and patient - you should have nothing to fear. I'll whip the guide up when I get home after work.
     
  13. sapporobaby macrumors 68000

    sapporobaby

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    #13
    You are the man. Appreciate it.
     
  14. mrwizardno2 macrumors 6502a

    mrwizardno2

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    #14
    As promised, here is a somewhat simple how-to on how to expand VMWare disk images the non-gui way... and also the gui way for Beta 2.2 users.

    First off we need to know where we store our virtual machines, and what the disk image is called. Likely these will be in your Documents folder under Virtual Machines. Here's my path to my example machine. I'll explain the various commands as we go.

    /Users/jimmie/Documents/Virtual Machines.localized/xpexample1.vmwarevm

    These paths are case sensitive. If you're unfamiliar with terminal, here's how to get there.

    When you first fire up terminal, you'll see something roughly like this
    [​IMG]

    Terminal should startup in your user directory, /Users/%username%. You can verify this by using the 'pwd' command, From here you want to find the path of the disk image you'll be working on. To list directories and files, the command you type is 'LS' but in lower case. To change to a directory, you use 'cd' and where you want to go. Notice how the prompt changes to show your current directory.

    [​IMG]


    A secret when switching directories or completing various commands is using the tab key. Try typing 'cd Docu' and then hitting tab. It will autocomplete the path for you, and you can just hit enter. This works great for tricky paths that have spaces or special characters. Otherwise, you will have to escape them with a backslash '\'. Alright. Down to business.

    I wasn't really sure how to edit disks with snapshots or multiple vmdk's, but from initial observations, it looks like you make the change to your root disk and the utility does all the rest of the work. My example is set to split the disk in 2 gigabyte chunks, so I have quite a few "chunks". So if you have a disk called xpexample.vmdk and several others that are xpexample-sNNN.vmdk, we will target the one without the numbers (N).

    [​IMG]

    The full path to the file I want to modify is /Documents/Virtual\ Machines.localized/xpexample1.vmwarevm/xpexample1.vmdk.

    Now, let's change to the directory containing the disk utility. My particular version of VMWare's utility is installed in /Library/Application\ Support/VMware\ Fusion/

    change to the directory by typing 'cd /Library/Application\ Support/VMware\ Fusion/' Remember to use your tab key! If it won't autocomplete, it's likely because of capitalization or an error. Back up a few characters and try again.

    Inside this directory, you will see many files, the one we are interested in is the vmware-vdiskmanager.
    [​IMG]

    If you run it without any options, it will spell out a help file that shows you exactly how to use it. To run the script, you will use './' This tells bash that you want to run the executable in the current folder.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    So, we can see in example 4 above to expand a disk, we use the flag/option/switch (whatever you prefer to call it), -x, to expand disk images. You will need to know the full path (remember the one we found earlier?) to your disk image.

    Type it just like it looks in the example (remember to execute it with './') and substitute your desired disk size and your path to your disk image. Use your tab key for autocompleting the path!

    [​IMG]


    In my case, I now have a 100 gigabyte disk.
    [​IMG]

    In Fusion beta 2, you should be able to resize partitions by simply using the GUI that's built into the program, if you installed the utility it prompted you to when you installed beta 2. I can't remember what it was called right now, I'll look it up later.

    You can either drag the slider, or just type whichever number you wish into the size box and hit enter. The save button will 'un-grey' and let you make the changes:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Whichever way you can achieve the same results. The GUI way is by far the better choice for those not comfortable in terminal, but the command line offers its own set of advantages with its multitude of options and power.
     
  15. Douge macrumors newbie

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    #15
    The terminal window method isn't working for me because I'm apparantly not specifying the diskname or some other argument. Any help?

    Macintosh-187:VMware Fusion Doug$ ./vmware-vdiskmanager -x 18GB /Users/Doug/Documents/Virtual Machines.localized/Windows Vista.vmwarevm/Windows Vista.vmdk
    Diskname or some other argument is missing.
    VMware Virtual Disk Manager - build 94249.
     
  16. mrwizardno2 macrumors 6502a

    mrwizardno2

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    #16
    Doug - are you escaping the spaces in the path?

    I see you have /Users/Doug/Documents/Virtual Machines.localized/Windows Vista.vmwarevm/Windows Vista.vmdk. When you enter this from the command line, are you actually entering "/Users/Doug/Documents/Virtual\ Machines.localized/Windows\ Vista.vmwarevm/Windows\ Vista.vmdk" or was the lack of escape characters unintentional? It can be picky if you don't have it right.
     
  17. Douge macrumors newbie

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    #17
    Windows does not recognized new size

    Thanks for your help. That was the issue.

    Unfortunately, I have run into another problem. Although the disk expansion went smoothly and the new expanded size of the disk appears under the settings menu in fusion, Windows Vista does not recognize the new size. How can I get Windows to "see" the additional space? Thanks in advance.
     
  18. mrwizardno2 macrumors 6502a

    mrwizardno2

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    #18
    Great to hear it was something simple. As for extending the partition, you will need to open the Disk Management component inside of the Computer management snapin.

    Since I don't have Vista installed, I can't easily create a how-to... but I know the approximate steps. Follow this guide here http://www.petri.co.il/extend-disk-partition-vista-windows-server-2008.htm

    If you have any problems let me know and I'll help out if I can!
     
  19. steveza macrumors 68000

    steveza

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    #19
    Nice job on the guide. I'm sure that going to help a load of people out of a tight squeeze.
     
  20. Douge macrumors newbie

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    #20
    Success!

    Ah, perfect! It worked exactly as planned. Thanks so much for your help. I might be posting again to get your help on other things as well!
     
  21. Majikk macrumors newbie

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    Sep 3, 2008
    #21
    Ahhhhhh! Thank you for the instructions it worked perfectly to go from 40GB to 60GB. I am a command line moron and your instructions were perfect.
     
  22. paule1s macrumors newbie

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    Jan 6, 2010
    #22
    Survey: Extend / Expand VMware virtual disks

    Before you begin, create a backup copy of the Fusion virtual disk so that you can restore it in case of failures. Extending a virtual disk can be a complex operations for several reasons, e.g.,:

    • The virtual disk that is full happens to contain the boot/primary partition for Windows
    • There are snapshots
    • There is insufficient disk space available on the physical drive to permit growth
    • It is a multi step process and involves use of different tools and commands in a specific sequence. Creative individuals have devised workarounds to extend the primary partition for Windows by using Linux boot disks and disk partitioning tools such as GParted, and you have to get this right.
    • You’ll find several posts regarding this topic on Google. Essentially, they are all variations of the posts summarized in

    http://blog.sharevm.com/2010/01/11/survey-extend-expand-vmware-virtual-disk/
     
  23. paule1s macrumors newbie

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    Jan 6, 2010
    #23
    Expanding the hard drive space on VMware Fusion with a single click

    There is an easy solution! You should download and try fatVM http://www.gudgud.com/fatvm

    fatVM is a reliable, robust, and safe, 1-click solution for extending the C drive of your VMware Fusion or Workstation virtual disk that is becoming full.
    • It provides a simple, intuitive, interface and a reliable process that hides the technical complexity of extending a virtual disk.
    • It is robust because it can extend virtual disks having snapshots and clones.
    • It is safe because it preserves your original disk, which remains available to you for when the need ever arises.
     
  24. heycoop macrumors newbie

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    Feb 22, 2012
    #24
    Worked Great!

    Mr Wizard--just wanted to say thanks for putting together these instructions, as well as the reference to extending the disk partition in Windows. This was PRECISELY what I needed, and got me over a huge hump in expanding an old Vista VM and migrating it to Win7. It's rare that 3 1/2 year old threads provide extremely beneficial and relevant information, but this was a gem. Thank you, thank you, thank you!
     

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