Exporting high res audio errors...

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by nateo200, May 29, 2012.

  1. nateo200, May 29, 2012
    Last edited: May 31, 2012

    nateo200 macrumors 68030

    nateo200

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2009
    Location:
    Northern District NY
    #1
    So I created sort of a video music bit from some high resolution audio recorded off of high quality Vinyl at 192khz/24bit....I put the songs into Final Cut Pro X with just visuals showing the name of the song...the project was set at 192khz and I tried to export the audio and first off the only way to get it to export as 192khz was to use XDCAMEX 35 which is fine...I can just re-export the video only as ProRes LT...So I got it exported as 192khz...dragged the file to Compressor 4 and use .AIFF 5.1 channel PCM at 96khz for my first track...I keep getting the errors in the attachments below...even when I try and output directly from FCP X I get the error (see both attachments)! Its usually last minute too! I have plenty of disc space as well! It keeps trying to re-write the audio (three times hence the error it "tried 3x").

    So I said alright I'll skip the 96khz for now and just use Audacity to downsample. I went to Compressor h.264 for video sharing and when to audio and selected 5.1 Linear PCM and magically got every audio setting under the sun and exported it as L-PCM 192/24 and it worked fine...tried to extract the audio but kept getting errors about quicktime not supporting it despite me using Mkv-merge to try and extract it....I have no idea what to do now...Quicktime plays the massive ProRes file just fine and dandy with the full blow 6ch 192/24 audio at a massive 27mbps for audio alone! Anyone have any suggestions? Compressor really makes no sense...I have no clue how a video sharing preset has options for 192khz/24bit 8ch audio when that isn't even under the Audio formats for Blu-ray and in general!! Currently trying to open the whole thing in audacity because Audacity seams to hold up to allot of "abuse" :D :O.

    My goal is to export these high res files into 6 and 8 channel individual files to assign as channels in DTS Master Audio Suite Encoder and Dolby Media Encoder SE to compress losslessly on to a Blu-ray disc eventually. Video track is a 720p video for the names of the tracks as they play and my two audio tracks will be a DTS Master Audio 7.1 96/24 track and a Dolby TrueHD 5.1 192/24 track (hopefully if I get this all figured out!). Its not a really serious project but I enjoy playing around with high quality audio/video stuff and teaching myself the trade as I go along. Just frustrated because I've never had issues exporting 999999 other 48/24khz projects I've done for fun and for volunteer work.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. WRP macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2011
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    If you want people to reply or bother reading it, make it easier. I'm not going to bother reading a wall of words. Paragraphs, spacing, whatever. It's just too difficult to read.
     
  3. ppc_michael Guest

    ppc_michael

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #3
    With audio at that resolution, I wouldn't trust Final Cut or Compressor.

    Soundtrack Pro MAY be able to help there, but I'd go with a full DAW like ProTools or Reaper.

    Usually with DVD/Bluray authoring, video and audio are completely separate so just do what you need to do visually in Final Cut and render it out without audio. Then do your audio work with a better tool and when you're done, join the audio and video together in the Bluray program.
     
  4. nateo200 thread starter macrumors 68030

    nateo200

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2009
    Location:
    Northern District NY
    #4
    Yeah I figured it out...In any project I always export out the PCM files to work with in other programs then eventually to master with Dolby Media Encoder or DTS MAS later on. It was such a relief to get that done and over with! Those files were eating my RAM and CPU alive! Like I said I usually never go over 48/24 (and its actually usually 48/16 with one or two true 24bit files thrown in but FCP pads 16bit AIFF/WAV which is nice to when editing to keep quality). Thanks!
     

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