expresscard +sd =more HD space for mbp?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by johnsy, Feb 5, 2009.

  1. johnsy macrumors 6502

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    #1
    With current size SD cards it is possible to add quite some space to mbp without removing any screws. But that brings me following questions:

    1 is there any NOT protruding expresscard SD card reader and will it keep SD card hidden while it is inserted?

    2 speed? How fast it is?

    Yes, I know about lexar expresscard hard drives. There are a lot of negative reviews online. They are slow, expensive and can be used only inside expresscard slot. SD cards on the other hand can be used in many other devices.
     
  2. kastenbrust macrumors 68030

    kastenbrust

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    #2
    Not Protruding = Flush

    Theres lots of threads on it here already.

    Search This
     
  3. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

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    #3
    SD cards are also slow.

    If you want fast, you'll need CF cards, but they are expensive. For example I bought a 8GB Extreme IV for $150. For I can only get about 50MB/s, which you can do better with any 7200RPM HDD.

    And there is no way this would be flush.
     
  4. Lyshen macrumors 6502

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    #4
    If price isn't a big concern look into Verbatim's recently announced SSD Expresscard. Faster speeds than previous SSD Expresscard solutions, which were USB based expresscards.

    Here's the announcement link:
    Verbatim's SSD Expresscard Announcement

    Only problem of course, not so friendly prices.

    "MRSPs of US$99.99 for the 16GB card, US$149.99 for the 32GB card and US$299.99 for the 64GB card."

    Availability is said to be at the end of February.
     
  5. johnsy thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #5
    ok, sorry for trolling, but after doing a search there is no single post with pictures. At least not with SD card inside expresscard adapter. As I understand expresscard adapters dedicated to smaller cards (SD and other crowd) deliver only USB speeds? So basically the problem is not with SD but with reader itself?

    I am OK with USB speeds as long as card sits completely flush and mbp uses less energy compared with hard drive use.

    Anyone care to comment on that? Any pictures?
     
  6. johnsy thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #6
    So I guess Verbatim is the only choice? Minus some points for price... I hope competition will fix prices. SD reader fitting flush would be better.
     
  7. UltraNEO* macrumors 601

    UltraNEO*

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    #7
    99% of Expresscard readers are flush to the Mac with the exception of CompactFlash readers this is because the actual CF card is BIGGER then the ExpressCard Slot. As to speed, well.. most of them are using the USB2 interface for accessing SD cards, though if you shop around you can fine readers that are SDHC complient, means they should support up to 32Gb RAM at Class6 but not all do!

    There are loads of manufactures out there, including Griffin, SanDisk and various chinese OEM's that are generic. Before you buy, just be sure it's Mac compatible cause not all are! As for pictures... look here
     
  8. johnsy thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #8
    Thanks UltraNEO, you saved my day. I think at this time expresscard hard drive or reader with SD card is more gimmick than really useful thing (considering prices and hassle). the only useful purpose for expresscard port is to add additional firewire port(s) or even better- esata port(s).
     
  9. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

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    #9
    Not really. I use the expresscard esata to have extra storage for sensitive docs , and its fully encrypted with truecrypt isntead of having a non removable partition or USB drive which can be easily swiped.
     
  10. kellen macrumors 68020

    kellen

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    #10
    Plus right now the 4GB expresscard is less than 10 bucks at newegg.

    I use my expresscard SD card reader all the time. Easier than carrying around a usb attachment. Plus I just install it and forget about it until I need to use it.
     
  11. UltraNEO* macrumors 601

    UltraNEO*

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    #11
    Unfortunately, I've yet to find a bootable ExpressCard SSD's, I get the feeling Apple hasn't provided or enabled EFI boot via ExpressCard yet.
     
  12. xilni macrumors member

    xilni

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    #12
    Any SDHC readers that use a faster interface than USB2.0? I've found so many of the USB 2.0 type I'm wondering if any Expresscard34 readers are all built that way.

     
  13. Skystar macrumors 6502

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    #13
    You have to be careful trying to find an expresscard reader that is truly flush to the MBP body. I have one that I got off eBay, which is completely flush to the MBP body, but when I insert an SD card, about 25% of the sd card is still sticking out. So if the OP originally planned on keeping that sd card in to supplement storage space, it may not work so well. In that case, an SSD expresscard may work better. This is a non issue to me, because I just use the reader to unload pics from my DSLR.
     
  14. Vancouvercanuck macrumors member

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    #14
    Anyone knows the speed of expresscard slot, will it slow down USB 3.0 when it comes out?
     
  15. illegallydead macrumors 6502a

    illegallydead

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    #15
    That is nothing to worry about now. USB 3.0 is at least in 2010, and by that time, faster, larger storage will be much cheaper.

    But at least theoretically, yes, USB 3.0 is way faster (faster than eSATA, maybe even SATA, I think, but that is all wildly optimistic and as we all know, USB 2.0 NEVER actually hits its advertised 480mb/s mark)
     
  16. drewsof07 macrumors 68000

    drewsof07

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    #16
    In *real-world use* I think USB 3.0 transfer speeds will be comparable to FW800, possibly 1200
    Yes the peak speed will be advertised as FAST, but we all know how far you can trust advertisements :rolleyes:
     
  17. johnsy thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #17
    by the time usb3 will hit a market we will be posting comments on revision 2 unibody macbooks. It is better to find something useful for current (classic) laptop.
     
  18. illegallydead macrumors 6502a

    illegallydead

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    #18
    Precisely. Especially when manufacturers are somewhat mum on whether that speed is MegaBits or MegaBytes for their device. Big difference, lol...
     
  19. Anonymous Freak macrumors 601

    Anonymous Freak

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    #19
    "ExpressCard" is a physical slot that carries two different signals.

    One is PCI Express, one lane, rated at 250 MB/s (1000 Mb/s) each direction.

    The other is USB 2.0, rated at 480 Mb/s (60 MB/s) total.

    The manufacturer of an ExpressCard chooses which interface they wish to use.

    For example, I have an ExpressCard memory card reader (similar to, but not the same exact model as, this one,) that connects via USB 2.0. So even if I had an SD card that was capable of more than 60 MB/s, I couldn't take advantage of it. (My card also isn't compatible with SDHC, which are the new higher-capacity, faster ones. The largest SD card it can handle is 2 GB.) When I look in System Profiler (or Device Manager when booted to Windows,) it appears as a USB device. As far as the OS is concerned, it is a USB device, period. It doesn't have any clue that it's an ExpressCard.

    I also have an ExpressCard FireWire 800 card (again, similar to this one,) that connects via PCI Express. That lets me take full advantage of the 800 Mb/s (100 MB/s) speed, I'm not limited to USB 2.0's 60 MB/s. System Profiler and Device Manager show it as a PCI Express device with ExpressCard extensions. (Hot-swap ability, for example.)

    But the PCI Express x1 link does have a limit of 2.5 Gb/s (about 250 MB/s after overhead) each direction. That means that an eSATA card is marginally limited, since eSATA based on SATA 2.0 supports up to 3 Gb/s (about 300 MB/s after overhead; which is slower than PCI-e's 250 MB/s. Plus, most eSATA controllers have two 3 Gb/s ports.)

    However, in the real world, eSATA's 3 Gb/s limit is never reached. In testing at work, I have used the fastest SSD's available, and have yet to hit a bottleneck caused by an eSATA ExpressCard. (At work, we have this card.) Likewise, USB 3.0's theoretical limit is 5.0 Gb/s, noticeably over eSATA's 3.0, yet I doubt an ExpressCard interface will be a limiting factor.

    Of course, we may see an ExpressCard 2.0 standard that implements PCI-e 2.0, which is 5 Gb/s each direction. In that case, USB 3.0 would be perfectly fine.

    (Disclaimer to my disclaimer: I work at Intel; but not in any department that has anything to do with upcoming standards such as USB 3.0, ExpressCard, PCI Express, etc. My guess on ExpressCard 2.0 is purely a guess, based on no inside knowledge from anywhere. If there is no ExpressCard 2.0 ever, don't come crying to me...)
     
  20. johnsy thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #20
    Thanks ehurtley for clarification of standards. :cool:

    Verbatim seems is late to the game. Even I have good luck with this brand- their DVD's are the best. I just saw that Seagate came up with 7200 rpm 500gb laptop hard drive while I was dreaming to upgrade to 320gb. It is on sale and price tag is only 140. Not that much- only 30-40 dollar premium for 7200rpm.
     
  21. Anonymous Freak macrumors 601

    Anonymous Freak

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    #21
    P.S., the ExpressCard/USB card reader I linked to appears to be the same physical model as mine, only with different branding; and SD cards (as well as Memory Stick cards,) fit almost wholly inside the unit, with maybe 1 mm of 'jut'. When inserted into the side of my 15" MacBook Pro (original model,) the card reader itself is completely flush with the side of the computer, so there is only the 1 mm of SD card poking out the side. Not enough to get caught on anything, unless your SD card has *REALLY* 'sharp' sides.

    But, again, this model doesn't support SDHC, so no >4 GB cards, and no high-speed transfer. (It does support Memory Stick Pro, including both high-capacity (up to 32 GB,) and high speed (up to 20 MB/s) operation.)
     

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