Ext. HD for Time Machine

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Rhobes, Nov 6, 2009.

  1. Rhobes macrumors 6502

    Rhobes

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Location:
    Missoula,MT
    #1
    Hello-

    I've read so many threads on various ext HD's to use with Time Machine & to think I can't name one good recommendation & that's what all the questions are in the threads. So, my conclusion is to go the expensive route and stick with Apple & Time Capsule. At least it's suppose to work together and if there are problems I can deal with it through the warranty & support. Plus, I'll easily figure(read) how to wire it up & I know it's all compatible.

    So, my question is 1TB or 2TB model? I have started shooting all my images in RAW files which will be the standard from now on, & have about 2000 already. I also have aprox. 2000 ~3MB jpg's now and a few short 15sec videos. I have about 7 CD's full of jpgs and ~500 slides I want to scan/digitize and download to the system. I will be drastically increasing the RAW photo's. I build web sites & have hundreds of thumbnails & smaller web based images associated with those sites which I keep.

    What happens when the backup HD gets filled, I assume you get some pop up telling you that. Do you just unplug the HD and save it?, then buy a new one & plug that in? ( but then you want to start from where the previous HD left off without copying everything on the first)? With 2TB maybe I would never have to worry about this?:confused:
     
  2. bikalpapaudel macrumors member

    bikalpapaudel

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2009
    Location:
    Dharan, Nepal
    #2
    I'm not sure you know what you want coz Time Machine is meant for taking snap shots of your computer's states at different points of time so that if anything goes wrong or a file gets deleted, you can just revert back in time.

    What you seem to be needing is something like a large backup drive. For time Machine anything works as long as its larger than or equal to your primary drive, not really necessitating TB sized monsters; unless you use similarly large HDDs on your primary computer (which I am guessing to be the iMac G4 200GB that you have in your signature).

    Hope that clears things up!
     
  3. bikalpapaudel macrumors member

    bikalpapaudel

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2009
    Location:
    Dharan, Nepal
  4. Tonyrage macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2009
    #4
    I think you kinda answered your own question there. Its obvious that you use alot of space as of right now and will use in the future. If I was able to afford a 1TB or a 2TB I would go for the 2tb. bith of these are huge but are already telling yourself how much space you use. just my 2 cents.
     
  5. Rhobes thread starter macrumors 6502

    Rhobes

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Location:
    Missoula,MT
    #5
    I don't feel like I have a clue as to what I want now. Basically your saying that Time Machine is not a true backup? I thought that is what it was. In other words I should keep a separate ext. HD to store my pictures on because it won't really do that? And as far as backing up all the applications etc. if the computer crashed it's not made for that either? I see little point in it now...
    I find the more I read threads here on backup systems including using Time Machine, Airport, Raid & all that I don't know where I'm at. I'm thinking to go into a Apple store and ask them but feel this is what they will tell me, use TM with Time capsule...

    P.S. I'm going to buy a new iMac 27" 2.8GHz i7, just trying to plan a backup system for that.:eek:
     
  6. mysterytramp macrumors 65816

    mysterytramp

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    #6
    Time Machine IS a true backup. It works a little differently so sometimes it's hard to describe.

    Here's how it works ... You connect a hard drive, tell TM that it's your backup drive, and it copies your hard drive.

    Then, every hour, it looks for changed files and save them. At the end of the night, it consolidates the changed files.

    Files that haven't changed aren't included in the daily backup, thus conserving hard disk space. When the disk is full, TM deletes backups, oldest first, and you can set it to warn you first.

    You can retrieve files two ways. You can just browse your backup hard disk looking for a file, or you can use the Time Machine app, which makes it easy to find files based on dates (and it's got a really cool UI).

    One of the things to be a bit concerned about with TM is that lots of people offer suggestions on things to exclude from your TM backup to extend the life of your hard disk. For example, it does make sense to leave out your Applications folder because the apps are from the Internet, store-bought CDs or your install DVDs so you've got backups, right?

    The trick is knowing where your data's stored first. I had an app that stored its data inside itself. I accidentally deleted some data, went to TM to retrieve and it wasn't there -- because I excluded my Applications Folder. Other apps store important data in the Application Support folder. Most apps, of course, save data where you say so (most likely the Documents folder), but some don't, and if you don't know where the data is, be careful when you tell TM to exclude a folder.

    Depending on the value of your data, you might want something other than TM or in addition to TM. Don't feel that you have to use Time Capsule. There are lots of companies making reliable drives for far less.

    mt
     
  7. Rhobes thread starter macrumors 6502

    Rhobes

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Location:
    Missoula,MT
    #7
    Thanks for your post MT,
    That clears it up. I guess I would go with a large drive & have it back up everything.

    Question: Can I just run TM when I want to? I don't think it would be necessary to have it running all the time, that's got to rack up the hours on a drive(always running). I would think I could turn on the ext. HD then click on TM & that would update things when I wanted, eg. after downloading allot of photos, and after I spend long hours working on websites(or have it run on those days).
     
  8. mysterytramp macrumors 65816

    mysterytramp

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Location:
    Maryland
    #8
    It takes far less time than you'd think. Personally, I wouldn't trust myself to remember to turn the drive on and off. I'm running a 2006 Mac mini -- in other words, old and slow by today's standards -- and I barely notice any degradation in computing horsepower when TM is doing its thing.

    mt
     
  9. Pondini macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2009
    #9
    MT is correct in that TM works best if you let it do it's hourly backups.

    (The part about a nightly consolidation isn't strictly correct, but the effect is the same.)

    You'll find much more info on the Apple Time Machine forums, including a couple of User Tips at the top. The Snow Leopard / Time Machine forum is at: http://discussions.apple.com/forum.jspa?forumID=1342
     
  10. CylonGlitch macrumors 68030

    CylonGlitch

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Location:
    SoCal
    #10
    If you're going to go external storage, you're in the same situation that I am in. I have closer to 20,000 raw images that take up some 400+GB of space. If I copy them to an external drive, if that drive fails, then I lose everything. What I have now is an external drive that I put all the images on; plus I have a server drive where I put all drives that is running all the time. This way, if one of the two drives fail, I have a backup. Additionally I have a Maxtor NAS that has support for an external drive to create backups to automatically; and I use that for data and other things.

    I really could use a good 2 to 4 TB RAID system to back up all of my data in one place -- but that is money I don't have. Not yet anyway. So multiple storage locations is my current solution.
     
  11. chickyd macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2009
    #11
    Can someone please explain why I can put an old sata II disk in an enclosure and connect it to my MBP by USB and get time machine support but can't use the same disk in a PC, connect over a network and do the same thing?

    From what I've read every TM backup that is not done through either a ReadyNas or TimeCapsule is open to corruption (even the 'officially' supported HP MediaSmart).

    It makes no sense to me why I have to hack to get this to work or pay apple £250.
     
  12. Angelo95210 macrumors 6502a

    Angelo95210

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2009
    Location:
    Paris, France
    #12
    The only drawback when you let the drive switched on is the noise. Whether your drive has a fan or not, it still produces a little humming.

    I like to have my work space quiet. So I switched it on from time to time to backup with TM.
     

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