Extend built-in hard drive with external hard drive?

Discussion in 'OS X Mavericks (10.9)' started by booyahbooyah, Dec 3, 2013.

  1. booyahbooyah macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    #1
    I have a MacBook Air with a 64GB SSD Drive (and OSX Mavericks).

    I need to install an instance of VMWare that is going to take up about 16GB.

    I want to attach a Disk Hard Drive via USB, and do it inside there.

    How do I go about it?

    Thanks!
     
  2. dictoresno macrumors 601

    dictoresno

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2012
    Location:
    NJ
    #2
    i just swapped out my 250GB internal drive for a new 2TB one. after i removed the 250GB drive and cloned it to my new internal drive, i purchased a $15 external HDD SATA enclosure on amazon and put the drive into it. there are wires inside that plug into the drive for data and power. the case also came with a USB 2.0 cable and AC power adapter. now i plug the drive into my USB port and use it as an external, mountable storage drive.

    so if you have an extra internal SATA hard disk laying around, just go on amazon and find an external case to hold a hard disk drive and then plug it in to the USB ports. or maybe can you just use a 16 or 32GB USB stick?
     
  3. old-wiz macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2008
    Location:
    West Suburban Boston Ma
    #3
    which macbook air do you have? the last two versions used proprietary SSDs..
     
  4. marzer macrumors 65816

    marzer

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Location:
    Colorado
    #4
    Which Airbook model do you have? USB2 is kinda slow for running VM's. If you have USB3 or Thunderbolt available you can run a VM from an external drive with very good performance. Esp. if you use an external SSD.

    Regardless, to run a VM on an external, you would want to install VMWare on the internal drive, it defaults to the Applications folder. Then create and store the VM images on the external drive. You might need to change default save location in VMWare prefs to point to the external drive before creating your VM images.
     

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