External Hard Drive deny permissions since Sierra Upgrade

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by kristeva, May 24, 2017.

  1. kristeva macrumors newbie

    kristeva

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2016
    #1
    Hi all

    I have an external HD I use to back up my music files and it's worked well but since I upgraded my OS to Sierra recently I can no longer add anymore files - my permissions are 'read only' and cannot be changed. I checked the format of the drive and surprisingly its Windows NFTS!

    I guess I'll have to reformat it and load my files on again, but how has this happened? How was I using it before if it wasn't formatted for mac?

    Cheers.
     
  2. Mr_Brightside_@ macrumors 68020

    Mr_Brightside_@

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Location:
    The 6ix
  3. Fishrrman macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #3
    If you're going to use the drive ONLY on a Mac, you should format it HFS+ with journaling enabled.

    Things just work better that way.
     
  4. kristeva thread starter macrumors newbie

    kristeva

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2016
    #4
  5. chscag macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    Fort Worth, Texas
    #5
    Most external hard drives sold nowadays are pre-formatted at the factory to NTFS. You do occasionally see drives sold as Mac ready but most are for Windows and formatted for that OS. However, it's easy enough to re-format to HFS+ for use with your Mac.
     
  6. msandersen, May 25, 2017
    Last edited: May 25, 2017

    msandersen macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #6
    Some drives do come with a special version of the Tuxera NTFS driver which only works with that drive, but you will have to install it first I think. Maybe it came with a handy installer to install an included backup program and the driver at the same time. Being a system-level driver, it would have been disabled in an upgrade, and probably found in the Unsopported folder. And yes, if it truly is NTFS, get a second drive the same size, format as HFS+, use something like Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper to clone it, and reformat the original drive and re-clone (though come to think of it, a true clone might clone the format as well). Now you have a ready-made backup for that drive which you can set up a regular backup regime with using the same clone program using an external case.
     

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