External Hard Drives For Video Editing

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by X-JRO, Feb 10, 2010.

  1. X-JRO macrumors member

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    #1
    Hey guys - didn't know where else to post this

    Just a quick question about hard drives

    I'm doing small time video editing but plan to get some bigger and better stuff happening. I'm pretty green so you'll have to get with me.

    I'm looking at getting hard drives for videos and to use for scratch. I was also looking at getting one to put my music and photos on, would that be better kept with my apps and such on my main machine? It's only 320GB.

    Oh and I was looking into RAID (obviously not very hard) and I still don't know if I fully understand it. A noob friendly explanation would be wonderful ^_^

    Thanks
     
  2. Tweak3D macrumors regular

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    Jul 17, 2007
    #2
    For video you would want Raid 0 which would be 2 harddrives operating as one big drive thus (in theory) giving you twice the performance. This would be great for a scratch disk for your work, but because you have 2 hard drives if one dies you lose all your data. Thus the likelyhood of this happening is twice as much as a single drive.

    For your data you would like to back up Raid 1 would be your best bet. It uses 2 Hard drives and mirros your data across both of them. If one dies, the other is still intact to keep you going.
     
  3. X-JRO thread starter macrumors member

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    #3
    I have a time capsule running time machine, so that should be alright, but once I move my video to any other drives, I'll be at risk of losing it.

    Anyway, what's the cost of a raid 0 setup, what gear would you recommend?
     
  4. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #4
    You don't need a Raid 0 for most consumer video editing, and the fastest port on your iMac is the Firewire 800 port, which has a maximum throughput of 65 to 75MB/s, a speed most HDD today can sustain without even mirroring them.

    To really get Raid 0 speeds, you need an e-SATA port.

    Also what kind of footage are you gonna editing? SD or HD?
    Where does the material (footage) come from? DV/HDV tapes, SD or other Flash cards, HDDs, XDCam disks, ...?

    What software do you want to use to edit?

    At work, we have several FW800 HDDs to store DV footage and it is no problem editing that kind of footage, as the data rate of DV is 3.25MB/s.
    We also edit Digi Beta (uncompressed SD) video, but sue to amount of tapes, we capture it in a lower quality and batch capture only the finished sequence with uncompressed video. Digi Beta takes up approx. 20MB/s if it is uncompressed.


    Only uncompressed HD footage really requires a Raid 0 setup, as that HD material gets data rate of up to 220MB/s.


    [​IMG]

    I see from your sig that you may be planning on getting a Mac Pro, a machine that can offer you Raid 0/1/5 if you want.
    But still, Raid might be a little bit over the top, as that entirely depends on your source footage.
     
  5. X-JRO thread starter macrumors member

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    #5
    I'm editing uncompressed SD (hell, I'm pretty sure it's uncompressed, that's how much of a noob I am), it's all on SD cards, I have a really bad panasonic : ( Saving for a Sony FX1000 before anything else (other than HDDs).

    I'm using a legit but REALLY OLD '05 Final Cut Pro Suite. I bought it off eBay it has already been upgraded from Final Cut Pro so I'm not sure if I can update it again >_>

    What would you recommend?
     
  6. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #6
    SD is short for Standard Definition, the predecessor to the current High Definition (HD) in the TV broadcasting system.

    What you mean by "SD card" is something else entirely, SD is short for Secure Digital and is a name for a memory card format.

    This the footage of that SD card is unlikely uncompressed, unless it is really, really big (16GB, 64GB) or the clips are short, very short.

    Uncompressed SD footage takes 1.6GB/min of storage space, HD footage varies due to the different offered solutions, and can amount to almost 13GB/min.

    So what camera do you use exactly and what format are you shooting in?
    SD with PAL or NTSC, or HD with 720p, 1080i, 1080p or HDV?
     
  7. Jaro65 macrumors 68040

    Jaro65

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    #7
    I have a couple of 2 TB WD Studio drives connected in a FireWire 800 chain.

    These are the drives: http://www.amazon.com/Western-Digital-Book-Studio-WDH2Q20000N/dp/B0016P7H3Q/ref=pd_bxgy_e_img_b

    The neat thing about them is that each 2 TB drive is built using two 1 TB drives. This enables you to configure each unit as a RAID 0 or RAID 1. The drives are probably as fast as you can get considering their size. You could probably achieve faster throughput if you had an ExpressCard slot in your MBP and used it to add an eSata port. But unless you're doing a full 1080P transfers, you should be fine with the FireWire 800.
     
  8. nanofrog macrumors G4

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    #8
    RAID 5 is only possible via a RAID card, not under OS X's software RAID functions in Disk Utility (which only 0/1/10 is available).
     
  9. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #9
    Thanks for clearing that up. But still a Mac Pro is needed for Raid 5.
     
  10. nanofrog macrumors G4

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    #10
    There are external devices that have it (i.e. FW, Ethernet,... interfaces - not getting into how well it works, as they may not address the write hole issue associated with parity based arrays), but for a PCIe card, absolutely.
     
  11. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #11
    That's true again, but to get the full speed out of a Raid 0 or 5 configuration, Gigabit Ethernet and FW800 are much to slow.
    I should have mentioned this in my earlier post though, so thanks for bringing it up.

    I'm afraid though, that all the tech talk might have frightened the OP as she hasn't reported back yet.
     
  12. nanofrog macrumors G4

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    #12
    Given there wasn't any indication max speed was required, I only went with devices that can provide a level 5 array.

    But when max throughputs are needed, PCIe is the best way to go, followed by eSATA and PM enclosures (fine for some, as it's faster than FW400/800, USB, or 1G Ethernet). Both require slots, and only PCIe are available in Intel based MP's. Cost is a major consideration of course.

    At any rate, if you need a card capable of a level 5/6/50/60, I can steer you in the right direction.

    RAID is complicated (and gets expensive fast), and must be researched thoroughly to avoid mistakes (which are costly and time consuming).

    So there's been a lot of information to digest. Hopefully, the OP will return with more detailed questions that can be used to dial in a solution to fit his/her needs.
     
  13. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

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    Oct 24, 2007
    #13
    Stay away from g-tech.

    If you don't heed my advice atleast get another drive and back up every day/twice per day. Oh and make sure you bookmark their support page...It'll save time.
     
  14. X-JRO thread starter macrumors member

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    #14
    Hey man, give me some credit, I know the difference between an SD card and SD footage. I don't know how you read it to imply I didn't. But alas you're probably right, I'd be compressed, my bad.

    AHAHA I was actually looking at http://www.g-technology.com/products/g-raid.cfm

    OP is a man, there are no girls on the internet.
     
  15. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

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    #15
    Purple font? Is that manly "down under"? :D
     
  16. X-JRO thread starter macrumors member

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    #16
    Mate, chicks love purple, it's a natural aphrodisiac. Google it >_>

    I'm the reason they call it, 'down under'...
    ;)
     
  17. J the Ninja macrumors 68000

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    #17
    There's NEVER a reason for Comic Sans. :D I hope you aren't doing graphics for your videos. :p
     
  18. X-JRO thread starter macrumors member

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    #18
    Chicks love Comic Sans mate

    srsly

    ;)
     
  19. X-JRO thread starter macrumors member

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    #19
    I'm almost ready to just **** it and get the G-Tech

    Don't make me get the G-tech guys, don't make me!
     
  20. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

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  21. X-JRO thread starter macrumors member

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    #21
    How bad are they, why do they sell so well if they're so bad?

    What's the fundamental problem and what are some alternatives.
     

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