External HDD failure: are my files corrupt?

gigatoaster

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jul 22, 2018
384
344
Singapore
Hello there

I use a Toshiba external HDD where I saved all my music in FLAC. That HDD was connected to a Mac mini 2014 for 4 years, then for a few month on an old MacBook Air 2011 and now on a Mac mini 2018.

Last night, I had few error messages: "Hard disk not eject properly". I didn't eject it and I could still listen to the music files on it.

However this morning: CATASTROPHE!!! My external HDD is ejecting itself after 2 or 3 minutes. I tried with a MBP from 2017 & 2018: same issue.

But when I connect to my MBA from 2011, I can access to the HDD. The light is white instead of blue on the HDD, signalling USB 2.0 instead of USB 3.0

So I ran to the shop and bought 2 HDD. I am currently copying the content to one HDD.

I played some music but my question is as follow:

How can I check that all my files are not corrupt or intact and if some are, is there a way to check it? Should I check on the old HDD or the new one I just bought where I copied all the files?

Thanks in advance for your help.

PS: now I realized why all the people says to backup!!
 

Velin

macrumors 65816
Jul 23, 2008
1,471
909
Hearst Castle
How can I check that all my files are not corrupt or intact and if some are, is there a way to check it?
Yes, there is a specific command to repair from hardware interruptions and failures.

1. Reboot > Single User Mode.
2. Unix command FSCK.
3. Command syntax: fsck [ -F fstype] [-V] [-yY] [-o options].

If this reads like jibberish to you, abort. You're likely to start WWIII from your command line, or at a minimum, bork your system files. For example: XARGS RM -f. Translation: terminate files, with prejudice.
 

gigatoaster

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jul 22, 2018
384
344
Singapore
Hello there

Thanks for your message, I understand until Reboot. I don't think I want to start WWIII, although when I was little I always dreamt of becoming a dictator.

The instructions you gave is for repairing the disk, but what about checking the integrity of it? Maybe there is a specific command line, in Terminal and no need to reboot?
 

Fishrrman

macrumors P6
Feb 20, 2009
17,179
5,536
After you copy the files to the new drive, run Disk Utility's "repair disk" function on the new drive.
Does it come out ok?

Another way to do it:
Use CarbonCopyCloner to copy the files from one drive to another.
When CCC does a clone, it will "take note" of any corrupted files that it finds.
These files WILL NOT be copied, but you will have a log of them when things are done.
This makes it EASY to identify which files are corrupted (if any).

CCC is FREE to download and use for 30 days. Trying it will cost you nothing.
 

Velin

macrumors 65816
Jul 23, 2008
1,471
909
Hearst Castle
The instructions you gave is for repairing the disk, but what about checking the integrity of it?
Not exactly. In fact I think I gave you the appropriate command, for your situation.

fsck, File System Consistency checK, is a system utility in Unix, Linux and other Unix like systems for checking and repairing file system inconsistencies.

File system can become inconsistent due to several reasons and the most common is abnormal shutdown due to hardware failure, power failure or switching off the system without proper shutdown. Due to these reasons the superblock in a file system is not updated and has mismatched information relating to system data blocks, free blocks and inodes.
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