fan noise

Discussion in 'Digital Audio' started by Redfern, Jun 14, 2007.

  1. Redfern macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    #1
    sorry if this is not the exact forum but...it is about fan noise from my
    G5 1.8 duo. Normally it is not too bad though of-course still has to be housed away - a cupboard with a big window. However, when the fan goes into "hyperdrive" not even the cupboard can contain the noise. I should say the computer does this wherever it is located - we are not talking about location of computer here. Is there a solution - for example replacing the fan? If so what make/model etc. Have others working in audio experienced this issue? I work as a voice over using a combined studio and control room hence the problem.
     
  2. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #2
    G5 1.8 duo?... Err, I think you might have your wires crossed. Do you have a G5 Power Mac, a G5 iMac or an Intel iMac? :eek:

    Regardless, use one of the iSlayer products (app or widget or whatever) to tell us how fast your fan is spinning. :)
     
  3. Redfern thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    #3
    thanks

    Many thanks. Using a PowerMac G5.
    Have downloaded the iSlayer. The fan is working ok but as soon as I notice the noise I'll note the stats and repost.

     
  4. Redfern thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    #4
    Fan stats (at its noisiest):
    CPU B intake 1000 rpm
    CPU B exhaust 300
    CPU A exhaust 3200
    CPU A intake 3104
    Drive Bay 1162
    Slots 76
    backside 51
     
  5. Father Jack macrumors 68020

    Father Jack

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2007
    Location:
    Ireland
    #5
    The first thing I noticed when I got my MacPro was how much quieter the fans were in comparison to my previous G5 PowerMac.
     
  6. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #6
    I don't think those numbers look all that bad. Yeah, the Power Macs were notoriously loud. I don't actually have one though, so hopefully someone who does can come by and help you out. :eek:
     
  7. Redfern thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    #7
    update

    I am not necessarily seeing this as a faulty fan. I just want to have a quieter system possibly by installing different fans etc.
     
  8. scottlinux macrumors 6502a

    scottlinux

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2005
    #8
    This is not possible. The thermal controls are software controlled in OS X, so trying to fit in custom replacement fans could be sticky. Buy a temperature controlled isolation box, which lots of studios use to reduce noise from the computer.

    Make sure that all dust is cleaned out from the inside of the computer, more importantly. If it has been awhile, get a can of compressed air and clean out all dust and dust balls. Sometimes if the fans are restricted they will turn on louder.
     
  9. Redfern thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    #9
    software control

    But even though the fans are software controlled can't they still be replaced by quieter running fans which have the same voltage and inputs etc as the originals? The normal operating speed of the fans is ok - about 1000 rpm. It's when they go into "overdrive" at 3200 rpm that there are real problems. Also the outside temperature has no effect on when this overdrive occurs. The computer is already in a well sealed cabinet venting to the outside but when this noise starts up not even the cabinet can stop the noise. I still think replacement fans (cpu unit) are the answer. Anyone tried this?
     
  10. Killyp macrumors 68040

    Killyp

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    #10
    The PowerMac and even the MacPro have very specific custom fans as far as I'm aware, so replacing them with a 3rd party option is not possible IMO...
     
  11. synth3tik macrumors 68040

    synth3tik

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    #11
    Your fan RPMs are high, but not all that high. A problem can be that the computer is in a cabinet. The fans move air, if the air can not go anywhere then the computer never cools down and causes the fans to speed up.

    I would take the computer out of its jail cell and let it breath. Move anything that will be mic'ed to a different room.
     
  12. scottlinux macrumors 6502a

    scottlinux

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2005
    #12
    My Powermac G5 fan speeds at are a little under that, and I have to put my head down next to the computer to hear that it is running at all.

    Your cabinet must be inhibiting air flow, or creating a mini reverb chamber of the computer noise.
     
  13. Redfern thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    #13
    in or out makes no difference

    sorry folks...the saga contunues.
    No the G5 makes the same noise whether it's in the cabinet or not and even when room temperature is cold! The comment about not being able to hear unless you put your ear near it is correct - for most of the time. However when it goes into its overdrive mode (as I call it) it is totally unacceptable for audio work either in the room or in the cupboard. The cupboard by the way is not some tiny box. It even has good ventilation from the outside. I am afraid the G5 I have is just incredibly noisey at times. I noticed postings elsewhere on the web mentioned earlier versions (of which mine is one) were prone to excessive fan noise at times. So far I have not seen anyone solving this issue other than putting the G5 well away in another room - preferably with a concrete wall between!!
     
  14. dogbone macrumors 68020

    dogbone

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Location:
    S33.687308617200465 E150.31341791152954
    #14
    My emac is pretty noisy and I was going to get a controller to slow it just a little but was advised not to.

    I recently bought an emac for a friend that is as old as mine and it was much quieter.

    I know that opening the emac up it too much hard work, so my question is...

    Is it a good idea to give it a massive blast of compressed air through the back or is that going to blow dust all over the inside of the computer, and do no good at all?
     

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