fast and easy to way increase overall volume on LOGIC track

Discussion in 'Digital Audio' started by theapex, Feb 22, 2008.

  1. theapex macrumors regular

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    #1
    is there a quick way to do this without distorting stuff?
     
  2. Drumjim85 macrumors 68030

    Drumjim85

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    #2
    with a combination of compressors and limiters, yes... The key is to get the rms up, without allowing the peak to reach zero.

    Everything you do is going to change you sound, but I would start off with a compressor with 3:1 ratio, and move the threshold until you get a reduction of about 3 or 4 db. Then add a limiter with a limit at .2 and bring the threshold down until it gives a reduction of about 1db.

    That is just a starting point and you will have to tweak it to what the medium calls for.
     
  3. theapex thread starter macrumors regular

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    #3
    when you say medium what exactly do you mean??? and is there somewhere that I can get more detailed information about this? thank you very much as that sounds like a great place to start. which track do you apply these insets to. I assume the master track. And if I am correct what types of effects and such do you apply to the individual tracks to get there level up? basically I added an eq effect to just about all the individual tracks and that did change the sound a bit. But i liked it. Is this kinda like mastering? thanks a lot

    I guess you use the eq to change and shape the sound...but the volume fader, and the pan knobs and stuff allow you to place a particular track in side the mix where it sounds best to you right?

    oh yeah...does the logic pro 8 suite come with any types of mastering kits or anything the like. I will try what you have already told me and then go from there.
     
  4. theapex thread starter macrumors regular

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    #4
    the peak is the number beside the volume fader thing right? also what is RMS....(is that what the number is)

    what do the reductions represent that you told me to try and get to?? and did someone else tell you those numbers to look for or was it trial and error or did you learn it in school or something.
     
  5. Drumjim85 macrumors 68030

    Drumjim85

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    #5
    wow, a lot of questions.. I'm a pro. engineer, I don't have or use logic, and I will try to answer your questions as best I can typing on a iPhone.

    The medium is the source, music, speech, what ever.
    The peak is the absolute loudest point in the medium, rms is the average level of the medium. If you raise the volume (the fader), its going to raise the whole source, but if the peak goes over 0 it's going to distort. So you need to compress the dynamic range of the medium so that the peaks and the rms are closer together. Like I said, you want to raise the rms while not letting the peak reach 0.

    Compressors, limiters, expandeds, and gates controll dynamics.
    Eq is a frequiency dependent amplifer.
    A fader will change the level in relation to other faders.
    A pan pot will change the ratio of which channel it comes out of (usually left and right).

    You can put compressors anywhere, it really depends on if you want it to affect one channel or the whole mix. I usully have heavy compression on individual tracks, and light compression on the master followed by a limiter.

    The reductions are how much you are bringing the medium past the threshold down... Esentially how much you are reducing the dynamic range.
     
  6. hakukani macrumors regular

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    #6
    I don't know if this would help here, but before I started with compression and eq, I'd normalize the track:

    "Normalization is a process that raises the maximum level of a digital signal to a specified amount—typically to its highest possible level, without introducing
    distortion."

    See p. 528 of the user manual for the procedure.
     
  7. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #7
    normalizing is bad. sorry, but it is.

    OP: you're probably comparing the relative volumes of your track vs. stuff you've bought. the stuff you've bought has been mastered and yours has not, therefore yours will sound more quiet.

    of course, you could go through some kind of self-mastering process, but unless you know what you're doing, it will probably end up sounding worse.

    the proper solution, short of paying for pro mastering, is to simply turn up the volume on your stereo.
     
  8. Drumjim85 macrumors 68030

    Drumjim85

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    #8
    IF you do this .. PLEASE don't normalize %100 .... shoot for around %75...


    from Bob Katz:
     
  9. hakukani macrumors regular

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    #9
    All good alternatives to the OP's problem.

    I know that I'm new to this forum, but I would like to add this;

    There are those (especially classical recording engineers, including Jack Renner) that would say eq and compression are just as bad as normalizing.

    Anything that is overdone is usually bad, whether it's eq, compression, normalizing, reverb, delay or even, yes level.

    The OP's question was not 'how can I improve the overall quality of my mix', but how to raise the overall level on a track. If you have a track that was recorded at too low of a level, then one of the options is to normalize.

    I didn't say how much. Just as with all other things audio, the less you have to do, the better it usually sounds. That's a given.

    All one can do is pick a tool, and try it out. We're very fortunate that with DAWs, most of the time there are 'do overs'.
     
  10. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #10
    i'm not certain it's "as bad", but there's a good deal of truth there. if you can get it all in performance and mic choice/placement, then imho that's better than compression and EQ.

    fair enough. but then his next thread would probably be, "i've my track loud but it doesn't sound good!" :)

    true dat.
     
  11. hakukani macrumors regular

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    #11
    I bow to your superior experience on this forum.:)
     
  12. theapex thread starter macrumors regular

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    #12
    thanks guys. I do appreciate all of your input. You have all been a great help to me through this forum.

    I thought that good sound was a given....I do want good sound. I was wondering if there was some type of mastering tools that came with logic that maybe I was just overlooking.

    Next, I was really wanting to get some direction as far as tools and such that could be used (through the insert effects) to help with this process.

    Turning the volume up load is always a choice, but I would much rather have the levels sound close to a normal level before I even get to the stereo.

    Here is the track. Take a listen and let me know what you think. I hope I can upload it on here.

    And just for the record.
     
  13. theapex thread starter macrumors regular

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    #13
  14. theapex thread starter macrumors regular

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