Fast Charge: Need a Fast Charge Cable or Just Power Adapter?

Discussion in 'iPhone Accessories' started by legaleye3000, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. legaleye3000 macrumors 65816

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  2. KrisLord macrumors 68000

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    #2
    Both.

    USB-C adapter providing 29w (14.5v 2A) Apple make one and there’s a couple of others that work when fast charging an iPad Pro so should work with the iPhone.

    You then need a USB-C to lightning cable, very few of these around that work so best go with an Apple one.
     
  3. legaleye3000 thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #3
    Can I just use a quick charge capable plug (non Apple) that I already have with the iPhone charging cable that comes with?
     
  4. KrisLord macrumors 68000

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    #4
    No, as that won’t output the right voltage. It’ll probably be equivalent of an iPad charger at best. The USB-A cable that comes with your phone is also limited to iPad speed charging (12w)
     
  5. The Game 161 macrumors P6

    The Game 161

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    #5
    Sadly not

    It really should come in the box like with android devices but sadly apple refuse to do so.
     
  6. zhenya macrumors 603

    zhenya

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    #6
    It's worth noting that if you already have a 12w iPad charger (check, most of the newer ones are 10w) then early results seem to indicate there isn't a great deal of improvement with usb-c PD charging. Certainly a hard sell if you are looking at spending $50-80.
     
  7. KrisLord macrumors 68000

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    #7
    It’s worth noting that quick charge is a Qualcomm product that even google don’t want manufacturers to use. Google are pushing USB power delivery.
     
  8. legaleye3000 thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #8
    So I just bought an Anker wall charger that supports quick charge 3.0 and it says it supports up to 2.4A. Won’t this work?
     
  9. KrisLord macrumors 68000

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    #9
    Quick charge 3 is irrelevant, and more likely suggests it won’t work as devices tend to support quick charge or usb power delivery.

    See if there’s any mention of 14.5v output.

    If not, it’ll work the same as an iPad charger. So faster than the 5w charger in the iPhone box, but technically not fast charging.
     
  10. RWil85 macrumors 6502a

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    #10
    Dear god, someone please make a sticky out of the pertinent wireless AND wired charging capabilities of these new phones.

    Everybody is confused lol.
     
  11. legaleye3000 thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #11
    Amen to that. I'm still confused... I thought the higher the output (such as 2.4A vs. 1.5A) means faster charging. Also, I thought that the cable doesn't matter (gold plated, etc.).
     
  12. KrisLord macrumors 68000

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    #12
    The problem is how Apple have communicated it over the years.

    For a while now iOS devices have charged faster with an iPad charger offering 5v 2A/2.4A= 10-12w.

    Now they’ve got 29w support they’ve not given it another name and so everyone interprets fast charging as different things - is it faster than the 5w in the box, or the fastest currently possible?

    To make it worse there’s some update coming to make wireless charging faster, which means some threads confuse wireless and wired charging....
     
  13. RWil85 macrumors 6502a

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    #13
    Bingo, I've stated in a few other threads that someone 'in the know' really needs to make a charging sticky and post it to clarify everything you've mentioned. I'll give it my best shot here in the two minutes I've got...

    Wireless:

    Some chargers are rated to output 5W and others have the capabilities to go as fast as 7.5W (or even faster). As of right now, iOS 11.0, the 8/8+/X phones are limited to accepting a wireless charge of 5W. In a later revision of iOS, presumably 11.1, that will be increased to a maximum of 7.5W (therefore, it might be important to you to make sure you select a charge that is capable of providing that speed - i.e. the Mophie/Belkin from the Apple Store that have it stated in the tech specs that it will provide 7.5W). If you use a charger that provides more than 7.5W - some Samsungs, etc. apparently provide up to 15W - I am assuming that the phone will only accept it's max rate.

    Wired:

    5W out of small brick that comes with the phone in the box = will charge at a relatively slow rate.

    10W/12W out of iPad bricks - will charge at a faster rate than the 5W.

    29W/61W/87W MacBook bricks - will provide what is called 'fast-charging' (as mentioned in the Sept. Event) only to the 8/8+/X. Must be one of these bricks which provide the faster rate - 29W+ - through a protocol named USB-PD (USB-Power Delivery) in conjunction with a USB-C to lightning cable. The advertised special here is that you'll get a 50% charge in about 30 minutes (presumably for the iPhone 8 size battery - so skew your expectations for the other devices accordingly). All of these bricks will default to the 29W output which is the max that all of the new phones can accept. The minimum associated cost is $49 for the Apple 29W brick and $25 for a 1M USB-C to lightning cable = $74 + tax.



    **I cannot get into the discussion of what about this 3rd party brick or cables might be OK to use as the information I've read is all over the place and I am not knowledgeable on the technical intricacies of these bricks/cables. Apparently the USB-PD is a big deal on the bricks and I've read that even things like Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0, etc. bricks that are rated at 29W or higher are not mandated to have this protocol built into them - which, obviously, means you may not be getting the 'fast-charging' rate that you think you are paying for. Also, Google has outright asked manufacturers to not use Quick Charge - but, rather, use USB-PD as it 'is the future of charging'. Take that for what it's worth. Same goes for cables - apparently the Apple USB-C to lightning is thicker than some 3rd party cables and presumed to be certainly cable of carrying the quoted 29W spec; whereas, the same can't be said for third parties. All of that being said - with electrical/charging accessories - I cannot speak to the safety issues of using third party accessories due to so many companies, manufacturing countries, cheaper materials, etc.


    That's about the best that I can do as of now after all that I've read - please, someone correct me if I've misquoted a spec somewhere.
     
  14. dominiongamma macrumors 68000

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    #14
    This really helped me! The whole what I needed for the iPhone 8 plus fast charging and wireless was little confusing but this really helped me
     
  15. kennyfte macrumors member

    kennyfte

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    #15
    So if I have a wireless charger connected to a iPad brick (micro usb cable), I could get 7.5W once the update is live?
     
  16. slickwrapsinc macrumors 6502

    slickwrapsinc

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  17. legaleye3000 thread starter macrumors 65816

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  18. eddiec312 macrumors 6502

    eddiec312

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    #18
    From what I've been reading I believe not. The Iphone needs a charger with USB-D technology and use a usb-c to lightning cable in addition. The charger you would need is this one: https://www.amazon.com/Anker-Delive...F8&qid=1506453178&sr=1-8&keywords=anker+usb+c

    This is just from what I've been reading on the forums, especially a thread on the Iphone forum about fast charging.
     
  19. legaleye3000 thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #19
    So confusing... Rather than pay a fortune at Apple and buy a USB-C charger, couldn't we just purchase a regular USB-A charger that supports the wattage/amps needed or with the USB-D tech in it, or, is such USB-D "tech" only available in the USB-C chargers and not the USB-A (common usb charger) chargers? Thanks again.
     
  20. KrisLord macrumors 68000

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    #20

    Ultimately it’s a higher wattage you want and you can get that by increasing either the voltage or amps or a combination of both.

    (Wattage = voltage x amps.)

    So to get the high wattage you need without increasing the Amps higher than 2.4A, you need higher voltage than the 5v limit that USB-A supports. (We’ve already maxed out higher Amps by moving to iPad chargers with 5v 2.4A giving 12W)

    I think Qualcomm quickcharge does increase the voltage , but via their own. Proprietary tech and sticking with USB-A connectors which aren’t designed for the higher voltage. This is why Apple and Google prefer USB-PD (usb power delivery) as the USB-C connector is designed to allow higher voltages as part of the spec.
     
  21. RWil85 macrumors 6502a

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    #21
    It’s “USB-PD” - for Power Delivery.

    The real problem is that yes you need a brick that supports the USB-PD. The cheapest third-party bricks on Amazon seem to be around $25 - Anker, Aukey, etc.

    The wattage isn’t the crucial criteria that needs to be met - it’s the fact it mentions that is has “USB-PD” built in - and as such, of course, they’ll be more expensive.

    The bigger problem seems to be that there are no third-party USB-C to lightning cables that are trusted yet to support the throughput required for “fast charging” that we’re speaking of; therefore, Apples seems to be the only option at a minimum of $25 for a 1M.

    So, you’re looking at $50 with a third-party brick versus going all Apple for $74. (Prices would then be +tax).

    Hope this helps.
     
  22. legaleye3000 thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #22
    [

    THANK YOU BOTH!
     
  23. AidenL macrumors 6502

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    #23
    I just ordered a 29 watt brick and USB-C to Lightning cable.

    Be a shame not to utilize the fast charging capabilities.
     
  24. maka344 macrumors 65816

    maka344

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    #24
    Anyone have any idea how long charging to 50% with an iPad 12w block vs a 29w block?

    I already have the iPad block so debating whether it is worth the outlay for the 29w block. I also have the usb-c > lighting cable from Apple.

    I also have a 2016 Mbp block but it’s too big to carry on trips if I’m not taking the Mac.

    Thanks.
     

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23 September 25, 2017