Fast charging lightning cables

Discussion in 'iPhone Accessories' started by kingdf, Jul 15, 2016.

  1. kingdf macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2014
    Location:
    United States
    #1
    Anyone have any links to any fast charging lightning cables? For example, I read that iPad cables charge much faster so I'm looking to buy some either online or in store. Thanks.
     
  2. aristobrat macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #2
    IIRC, it's the charger (amperage) that makes the charging go faster, not the cable itself. The iPad charger is 2A, the iPhone charger is 1A. I'd think any 2A charger would be what you're looking for.
     
  3. kingdf thread starter macrumors regular

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    Feb 18, 2014
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    United States
    #3
    Would the amperage be displayed on the package by any chance?
     
  4. Paco II macrumors 65816

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    Sep 13, 2009
    #4
    There are lower quality cables that can potentially deliver a lesser charge, but if you buy any certified cable, that will be fine. As mentioned, it's mainly the charger that matters. For single USB charger, get one that is at least 12w and for dual USB charger at least 24w
     
  5. kingdf thread starter macrumors regular

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    Feb 18, 2014
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    United States
    #5
    I'm trying to get a single lightning - USB charger. Are he watts stored on the packages? I'll def look for them.
     
  6. aristobrat macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #6
    To Paco II's point, sometimes the chargers are rated using watts (12w vs 24w) instead of amps (1a vs 2.1a).

    From the packaging I've seen, it's hit or miss if it'll show the watts or amps. I would assume that most packaging that doesn't show 24w/2.1a means that it's the slower 12w/1a.
     
  7. TheIntruder macrumors 6502a

    TheIntruder

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    #7
    A Lighting cable is a Lightning cable, which serves to both charge and sync.

    There are no "fast charge" or "charge only" cables like on the micro-USB side, where the data lines are omitted, or pinouts configured to signal devices into rapid charging mode.

    In theory, all Lighting cables should perform similarly, assuming that Apple's MFi specs also include a minimum wire gauge. However, that doesn't preclude some brands from employing heavier gauge wiring, either for better durability, more robust current carrying capacity, or both.

    In the iDevice world, charging speed is dictated by the power adapter, and the device.

    Early devices would only accept a maximum of 1 amp input, and were supplied with 5 watt adapters.

    As the larger devices like the iPad (with higher capacity batteries) came along, that limit was increased to 2 amps, then 2.4 amps, and corresponding 10 and 12 watt adapters.

    The USB controller in the newest devices like the iPad Pro 12" includes the Power Delivery spec, which can handle even higher rates, even though Apple still only bundles a 12 watt adapter with it. People have found that using the 29 watt adapter for the MacBook, along with the USB-C to Lightning cable will greatly improve charging speed.

    For whatever reason, Apple can tend to be conservative with the bundled adapters they provide. The iPhone 6 series was the first iPhone to accept ~2 amp input, but was still only bundled with the 1 amp / 5 watt adapter. They've also reverted back to 10 watt adapters on all but the large iPad Pro. Even the iPad Air, which originally shipped with the 12 watt adapter, switched to a 10 watt after the Air 2 was introduced. The 6s still ships with the venerable 5W "sugar cube" adapter, though maybe for size and portability more than anything else.

    Other things to note -- not matter how much current an adapter can supply, a device will only draw what its controller allows it to. So using that 29W adapter with an iPhone 5 won't make any difference.

    Also be cognizant of the misleading descriptions used to market some adapters and portable battery packs. There is a distinction between the total power an adapter can supply, and how that is distributed between the number of ports it has.

    To charge every device at maximum speed, each port must be capable of the maximum current supply, and the sum of the overall total should be equal to the number of ports multiplied by the capacity.

    2 ports x 12W = 24W, so an 18W adapter with 2 ports obviously won't be able to charge two iPads simultaneously at full speed, but it will handle an iPad and an older iPhone.

    Remember to consider both the spec per port, the overall rating, and do the math.
     
  8. skinned66 macrumors 65816

    skinned66

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2011
    Location:
    Ottawa, Canada
    #8
    If you can get the output voltage and wattage for a given charger you can do the calculate the amperage yourself (use DC.)
     
  9. Paco II macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2009
    #9
    For single USB charger, just look for 12w or 2.x amps. One or the other will almost certainly be listed.
     

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