Faster RAM in a late 2008 & 2010 MBP

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Hexley, Mar 11, 2011.

  1. Hexley, Mar 11, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2011

    Hexley macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2009
    #1
    Both the late 2008 & 2010 MBP accepts 1066 MHz PC3-8500 DDR3 SDRAM.

    Is it possible to use DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) in both of them? In years past I know that you can stick in 133MHz SDRAM DIMM onto a 100MHz SDRAM slot and it will work.

    SODIMM in question is Kingston HyperX 8GB (2 x 4GB) 204-Pin DDR3 SO-DIMM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Laptop Memory Model KHX1600C9S3K2/8GX

    Can this be done today?

    I am asking this as I may be selling the 2008 MBP within the year and would like to transfer the newly bought RAM to the succeeding 2011 iMac that will probably use the faster SODIMMs.

    Will it also fit into the cramp space of the MBP?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. paulrbeers macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    #2

    I have no idea about 2008's, but my 2009 I ran 4GB of PC3-10666 (1333) in my 2009 for awhile. It recognized it as 1333 believe it or not. I am not sure why you are looking at 1600, since the new ones only use 1333, but then again maybe I missed an announcement somewhere?
     
  3. Hexley thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2009
    #3
    Future-proofing. ;

    I'd like to have some leeway on where I can stick memory into.

    Newer Macs would probably use 1600MHz memory at one point. I dont want to end up having to rebuy RAM again if at all possible.

    DDR4's expected to come out in 2015.
     
  4. kidaquarius macrumors member

    kidaquarius

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Location:
    Detroit
    #4
    In theory it should be backwards compatible and automatically downclock.
    However, I have read of people having problems trying this in Macs.
    Personally I have never tried this, but that's what I've read here and elsewhere.

    Besides, future proofing your RAM is a needless thing to do (IMO).
    RAM has become a cheap upgrade, in relation to the price of the notebook itself.

    For example, I spent approximately $1,100 on my MacBook (after tax) and upgrading the RAM from 4GB to 8GB accounted for 6% of the initial price of the notebook.

    I upgraded to 8GB of G.Skill 1066MHz RAM; it's only $70 right now.

    I would buy what's compatible and skip on the future proofing.

    Cheers.

    [sent from my android]
     

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