Fear of buying iPhone 3Gs

Tclare

macrumors regular
Original poster
Sep 30, 2006
119
0
Hey Guys,

I am currently using an awful mobile phone and I desperately need an upgrade. Potentially next month I will have enough money to buy an iPhone 3GS on an 18 month contract. What I'm worried about is that when iPhone OS 4 and the new iPhone comes out around June time, my 3GS will look featureless in comparison and I'll regret not hanging on. My phone at the moment could probably hang on until June, but it would be a painful couple of months. What would you guys do if put in my situation? Another factor to take into account is that I am after a 32gig version, so there's potential for a price drop in June. Ohh... It's all so confusing. :/
 

MacDawg

macrumors Core
Mar 20, 2004
19,708
4,274
"Between the Hedges"
What exactly is making your phone so awful and in need of an upgrade?
What is it that will make it so painful to hang on for a few months?

I don't understand

Woof, Woof - Dawg
 

matttye

macrumors 601
Mar 25, 2009
4,953
30
Lincoln, England
Wait. It's only 4-5 months away, and even if the latest and greatest iPhone doesn't tickle your fancy, the other versions will see a price drop.
 

jaw04005

macrumors 601
Aug 19, 2003
4,369
15
AR
No but all of the others have been released in June/July.
And Schiller said last year “…the holiday season (Novemberish), the educational buying season (late summer), the iPod product cycle (October), the iLife development cycle (usually March), the iPhone cycle (June)."
 

MacDawg

macrumors Core
Mar 20, 2004
19,708
4,274
"Between the Hedges"
And Schiller said last year “…the holiday season (Novemberish), the educational buying season (late summer), the iPod product cycle (October), the iLife development cycle (usually March), the iPhone cycle (June)."
Would have been nice if he had given the MBP cycle
We could have solved the Arrandale Thread right here

Woof, Woof - Dawg
 

OneMike

macrumors 603
Oct 19, 2005
5,597
1,490
At this point I would wait. We can't guarantee, but I think most expect a new iPhone in the June area.
 

Cask

Guest
Jul 14, 2008
243
0
Buy now, if June comes and the 4th gen is a really awesome update and you must have it, sell the 3gs and buy the 4th gen.
 

Eminemdrdre00

macrumors 6502a
May 10, 2008
612
28
Just think...it's only 4 "painful" months vs. 18 painful months of having the "old" iPhone instead of the new one!
 

ToroidalZeus

macrumors 68020
Dec 8, 2009
2,301
821
You got what 4 months until a new iPhone? Do you really want to live 4 months without an iPhone. Look technology will always change, just get a 3GS be happy and get an iPhone 5 when it comes out. Or if the iPhone 4 is really that great then sell your 3GS and open a new line on your account to buy a subsidized iPhone.
 

Madmic23

macrumors 6502a
Apr 21, 2004
661
422
I'm in the same boat as you. I have an upgrade credit at the start of March, and thinking of picking up an iPhone 3GS. I can upgrade every 18 months on my plan with Bell in Canada.

Yes, you could buy the 3GS now and in 4 or 5 months see the new iPhone come out and feel like you have old technology.

BUT. On the flip side, you will be eligible for an upgrade 18 months from now, which would put you in line for an upgrade to the 2011 iPhone which would be even more advanced than the upcoming 2010 model.

Just a bit of a different perspective.
 

unixfool

macrumors 6502a
Jan 21, 2006
605
0
Northern VA
I upgraded from a 3G to a 3GS two days ago. I didn't want to play the waiting game and there's a HUGE difference between the performance of 3G and 3GS. Also, I've learned that being one of the first to adopt a new technology or new product line means you're possibly going to be facing production issues, so I usually skip rev A scenarios.

I'll be quite happy with my 3GS...already enjoying it, in fact. But really, if I want the next generation when it is released to the masses, there's nothing that's going to stop me from getting it. I'll just do it smartly, if it even comes to that (sell my 3G or GS, or sell both, then take the money and use it to purchase the next phone).

Honestly, I don't believe in the 'get it later' statements or the 'if you get it now, you'll be obsolete in a few months'. With anything nowadays, your purchase is obsolete the second it is released to the masses.

If you want/need it, just get it...you're already answering your question (to the OP).
 

dukebound85

macrumors P6
Jul 17, 2005
18,055
1,183
5045 feet above sea level
I upgraded from a 3G to a 3Gs two days ago. I didn't want to play the waiting game and there's a HUGE difference between the performance of 3G and 3Gs. Also, I've learned that being one of the first to adopt a new technology or new product line means you're possibly going to be facing production issues, so I usually skip rev A scenarios.
What makes the next iphone a rev A product....? couldnt you say the 3gs was a rev A as it used a different cpu and all that jazz:rolleyes:
 

unixfool

macrumors 6502a
Jan 21, 2006
605
0
Northern VA
What makes the next iphone a rev A product....? couldnt you say the 3gs was a rev A as it used a different cpu and all that jazz:rolleyes:
I'm thinking I shouldn't have to tell you this and maybe it is more of the way I chose my wording, but...

Every time an Apple product is revamped, that particular revamp has certain issues that the previous iteration didn't/doesn't have. Such issues are usually sorted out over time. I don't know about you but I don't want to buy a new flashy phone only to be forced to be a beta tester. I prefer trusted and proven technology. If that means I have to lag behind on my purchases by a year or so, so be it.

When Nissan's Titan was rolled out (2003, I believe), I wanted it so bad. I'm glad I passed, because that year's truck had a serious rotor issue that generated several technical bulletins (and maybe a recall...dunno). Those who waited and bought the truck the next year didn't have to deal with that crap. This happens with almost everything (at some point in time) that is mass-produced but its enough of an issue that I try to avoid being the first to own a new or revamped product.

Basically, there's usually a price to pay for being an early adopter of any product. That's my view. You don't have to share it but its worth pointing out the the OP, IMO.
 

dukebound85

macrumors P6
Jul 17, 2005
18,055
1,183
5045 feet above sea level
Your definition of what constitutes a first generation product differs from mine.

I could argue that you bought a rev a product of the iphone 3gs as it introduced a new cpu, and graphics among other things

An example of what I consititute a rev a product is akin to say the first core2duo mb. The next iteration still using the c2d chip with same platform would be a rev b. When they change the chip set, that would constitute a new rev product

Here is how I classify the iphone in terms of revisions
iphone:rev a
iphone 3g: rev b
iphone 3gs: rev a again
iphone 4: ?