Federal court strikes down FCC net neutrality rules

onepoint

macrumors 6502a
Aug 3, 2010
819
464
USA
The FCC will likely move to reclassify ISPs under the current telecom regulations, after which the ISPs (and their lobbyists) will go nuts.
 

MacNut

macrumors Core
Jan 4, 2002
21,973
8,205
CT
I don't think this is the end of net neutrality just that it has to be reformed. The judge didn't shoot down the idea just the implementation.
 

G51989

macrumors 68030
Feb 25, 2012
2,530
10
NYC NY/Pittsburgh PA
This is clearly a victory for the free market and America's struggling mega corps, finally they get a real say in this country

/s


But really, lets hope the FCC can move to reclassify ISPs as any other telecom, this is mostly a grab by lobbyists to true to stop the approaching flood of Youtube and Netflix like services that will most likely start cutting the cord to the cable box.
 

DocNYz

macrumors 6502a
Jun 9, 2008
625
40
East Coast, USA
http://www.theverge.com/2014/1/14/5307650/federal-court-strikes-down-net-neutrality-rules

Posting this while I still can........ Wondering how forumers feel about this issue. I for one am adamantly against it, as it will make it even harder for startups to compete with big existing companies.
Seriously guys, this is a HUGE issue and REALLY needs to be front page news ...

This could be the end of the internet as we know it.

And I am a complete free market capitalist. This, however, only benefits the few ISP monopolies we have in America. They will overcharge and over sensor both the consumer and the corporations alike making it a lose-lose for everyone except a handful of horrible quality providers that almost everyone is forced to use with no choice between them.

And this being a Mac site, LTE on the current gen iOS devices is often an order of magnitude or more faster than most non-fiber options that the vast majority of the country has to deal with. Even in big cities most buildings force you to get some horrific ******** like TWC.

Run by these people: http://bgr.com/2013/03/01/time-warner-cable-criticism-353827/
 

impulse462

macrumors 68000
Jun 3, 2009
1,909
2,501
Not the best source of information, but on a comment section (on the verge I think), I read that the head of the FCC was a past exec at a wireless or cable company. That would make a little more sense.

Either way this ruling is bad.
 

iizmoo

macrumors 6502
Jan 8, 2014
260
34
This is overblown. Any concept can only be an issue if it's universally accepted. This is strictly an American issue, not global to the Intertubes in anyway shape or form. If it's not universal, it can't stop or affect the internet in any functionally critically damaging ways.

Net neutrality was only partially effective anyway, you do get to choose your bandwidth from the server loop back to the client, and for those of you who know how bandwidth and peering agreeements works to shape traffic, you know that already has a significant impact on performance.

The only loop this really affect is the local loop, which are answerable to the local franchise boards, as well as consummer outrages if they actually shape traffic in a negative way.

I see the end of Net Neutrality as a huge boost to SMB that can now choose premium bandwidth for their servers to give visitors a much better service experience. It may also help on security from massive online attacks, which right now the peering carriers are legally forbidden from discriminating against...

If you look closely, most of the rest of the world do not have Net Neutrality, or any law as silly as the way it's written up, and their Intertubes are still filled with LOLCATS just fine.
 

McGiord

macrumors 601
Oct 5, 2003
4,533
287
Dark Castle
I am really curious as how this whole thing evolves. Hopefully there will be a better future to all of us.
God bless the internet.
 

roadbloc

macrumors G3
Aug 24, 2009
8,785
211
UK
Yes, the D.C Circuit Court of Appeals vacated the heart of the FCC’s open Internet rules. But it also, more quietly, ruled that the FCC has authority to regulate broadband providers to protect Internet openness. In doing so, the court may have handed the FCC — and the public — a victory that goes well beyond network neutrality.
As long as this bit is true, I'm not seeing any issues. I don't think our country even has a net neutrality law.
 
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