File sharing between Windows 7 and iMac

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by zottffssen, Jun 23, 2010.

  1. zottffssen macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    #1
    Hi
    Got my first mac today, and I realised that I could hook my old comp up to my iMac to speed up the file transfer process. Being completely clueless about macs, I found and followed this tut:
    http://macs.about.com/od/filesharing/ss/file-sharing-win7-snow-leopard.htm
    which seems to work.
    However when I try to access the computer it just takes ages then times out. Firewall is off on both the PC and the mac, antivirus is off on the PC.
    Can anyone help me?
     
  2. mrbash macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2008
    #2
    YOu may have to disable Home-Sharing and enable the more traditional file share on your Windows 7 PC. Then restart you mac a few times so that the SMBd reads the settings properly.

    To be honest, peer-to-peer sharing between Macs and Windows using CIFS is a crap-shoot. I've been using this system for years and its flaky. A better option is to set up NFS shares but that is a whole lot of work.
     
  3. mwchris macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2008
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #3
    I have had success by simply enabling file sharing on your mac. You do not have to disable home sharing on your W7 computer. There should be a "network" button or picture below home sharing on your W7 machine. Click that to see your mac. Your Mac will only show up if you enable windows sharing in the sharing profile of your mac, AND select what folders to be visible. By default only your "shared" folder is visible. Also, when you select sharing on your Mac, be sure you select the third choice, it says something about sharing for windows.

    Good Luck! As others have said it can be hit or miss.
     
  4. barkway macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    #4
    Windows 7 & MacBookPro network/file share

    I have desktop PC running Windows 7
    Child has MacbookPro running Mac OS (snow leopard I think).
    I've managed to get the two computers to see each other via the network. Here's my problem: I need to be able to SEE and remotely administer things on my child's computer (as responsible parents SHOULD do until kids develop maturity and trustworthy computer habits, & to monitor for perverts). I'm having access issues. For example, when I clicked on his Music folder from my PC, it said I was denied access. I've turned on everything I know in both windows and on the mac to allow read and write file sharing so am not sure why I'm being denied access.
    Problem Two: I need to know how to set up a process whereby logs of his chats, and the sites he visits are sent to me on my PC so that I don't have to log on to his Mac to see them. It IS logging those things for me using Mac's Parental Controls, but how do I get those logs sent to me remotely or via email?
     
  5. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    Location:
    Canada, eh?
    #5
    One thing to consider is VNC. Then if you ever wanted to do a spot check, you just turn on your remote client and have a look-see.

    As for logs, you just need to figure out where the log files are being stored. Maybe set up a cron job that emails them to you weekly, or copies them to a shared network folder for you so you can copy them at your leisure.

    However, I think the better solution is to keep your son's computer in a shared space like your living room or kitchen, as opposed to in his bedroom. This encourages children not to have any expectation of "privacy" when working on the computer, and allows you to have times when you can explore a website together and talk over your concerns about safety together. It's good to be concerned and to monitor his usage, but I bet that doing so as a collaborative effort will go over better than "snooping" in the computer logs.

    You could also consider putting your router on a timer to restrict the times of day that the internet is available in your house.
     
  6. mrbash macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2008
    #6
    I agree with this. If you want to develop real trust with your child. Snooping on what your child is doing is creepy and will definitely lead to trust problems later on.
     

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