FileVault and Home Directories

Discussion in 'macOS' started by TechieJustin, Nov 30, 2009.

  1. TechieJustin macrumors 6502

    TechieJustin

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Location:
    Pennsylvania, USA
    #1
    Just a quick question about FileVault.
    We all know about Firefox and Safari's caches. Are they stored in the users home directory?
    If a laptop is stolen and the home directory is encrypted, I want to make sure somebody can't look in the cache and get whatever information is sitting there unencrypted.
    When a user shuts down and FV is enabled, what (if anything) is not encrypted for that user?

    Hopefully this makes sense.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. rowsdower macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2009
    #2
    I think Firefox keeps that sort of thing under
    Code:
    ~/Library/Application Support/Firefox/Profiles
    so it should be encrypted.
     
  3. TechieJustin thread starter macrumors 6502

    TechieJustin

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Location:
    Pennsylvania, USA
    #3
    What about Office '08? Since Microsoft apps on Mac tens to bring MS traits (such as crashing, bugs) over, I'm thinking it might leave remnants all over the place. :apple: FTW!
     
  4. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #4
    Yes, the caches will be encrypted as they are stored inside your home directory. Only the home directory is encrypted, but that should be enough for most people. Some apps may store some things outside your home directory, but it's rare and generally not something with personal information. It all depends on the app though.
     
  5. Jethryn Freyman macrumors 68020

    Jethryn Freyman

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2007
    Location:
    Australia
    #5
    System logs and system caches are stored outside your home folder.

    Filevault is pretty mediocre. The header keys are actually encrypted with 3DES (equivalent 112 bits of security), not AES (128/256 bits of security), and if you have a master password, that's encrypted with RSA (which is equivalent to 56 bits of security.)

    It's also far slower than full disk encryption (I use PGP.)
     
  6. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #6
    I believe that was only true for 10.4 (Tiger). It got upgraded to 256-bit in Leopard.
     

Share This Page