FileVault and OneDrive

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by UPBaylor, Aug 4, 2016.

  1. UPBaylor macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2014
    #1
    Simple questions, I think.

    I use OneDrive running in the background to back up all my data and media files. Currently, I don't have my MBP (late 2014) encrypted, but I'm considering turning on FileVault. If I do, will I notice any difference with my OneDrive files if accessed remotely? Will they now be duplicated as the previously unencrypted files and now with the "new" encrypted ones?

    And, in a similar vein, what happens if I decide to stop using or turn off File Vault later? Can I go backwards?

    Thanks for any advice or thoughts.
     
  2. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #2
    Absolutely nothing will change with respect to how OneDrive works. It will not even know the difference. There will not be duplicated files.

    If you don't like FileVault you can just turn it off and everything will be right back like it was.

    FileVault does not exactly encrypt the files themselves like you might be thinking. What is does it turn the entire Macintosh HD volume into an encrypted core storage volume. Once you enter your password and boot, all the files and folders and everything else look exactly like they always did to you and any apps like OneDrive or Dropbox.
     
  3. yukari macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2010
    #3
    The bottom line, the files in OneDrive are NOT encrypted.
     
  4. UPBaylor thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2014
    #4
    Thanks! Both responses very helpful!

    I'm curious then, what is the downside to using FileVault? I've heard some minuscule performance downgrade, but that sounds like it's non-noticeable for routine use, which mine is.

    Weaselboy - just wanted to give you a special thank you! You have been very helpful on several issues I've asked about on these forums and I appreciate the help! I always pay special attention to any of your posts I come across.
     
  5. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #5
    You are quite welcome.

    Yes, that is about it... there is a very small performance hit. I don't even notice it.
     
  6. KALLT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    #6
    Two other downsides I can think of are that CoreStorage is a pain in the arse to manage once it is set up and that older systems (pre Lion) or other operating systems cannot work with it. If you only have that one system partition on your internal drive and do not plan on using Bootcamp or like, i.e. changing partitions later on, then you will be fine. Managing multiple partitions is something that becomes unwieldy once CoreStorage is involved, especially if the partition is encrypted. As a third downside, there is the fact that with FileVault the booting process and the login screen changes, as recently discussed here. If you have multiple user accounts, FileVault becomes a wee inflexible sometimes.
     
  7. UPBaylor thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2014
    #7
    KALLT - If you ran into issues, couldn't you turn FileVault off?
     
  8. KALLT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    #8
    Yes, of course. But it takes time. Encrypting and decrypting a drive is a lengthy process. Even on an SSD it can easily take an hour or more, spinning disks can take several hours to a day. You cannot quickly switch from HFS+ to encrypted CoreStorage and back. This is generally not a problem as long as you contemplate this beforehand when you set up your system and always have a backup or two (restoring from backup takes a negligible amount of time).
     
  9. grahamperrin macrumors 601

    grahamperrin

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2007
    #9

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