Filevault

Discussion in 'OS X Mavericks (10.9)' started by ricede, Jul 7, 2016.

  1. ricede macrumors regular

    ricede

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #1
    i read this on a recent post " Avenged110 said:
    Mavericks (and Safari) should get maybe one or two more security updates before 10.12 hits in October. After that my plan is just to keep FileVault enabled and both firewalls at their highest levels. "

    I have never bothered with file vault - it just seemed like another way for corruption to creep in. Also i had the understandinging that its main use was to prevent someone being able to remove a HD from one computer and loading it into another one ( to be able to read it. ) The 3 or 4 critical files that i have on my mac are enclosed in encrypted dmg files.

    Am i missing another reason to turn on file vault ? Thoughts please.
     
  2. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #2
    The benefit is it encrypts the entire disk so nobody can se anything you have on there. In your case, even though you have your files in an encrypted DMG, someone could still reset your admin password and see things like your contacts and calendar for example.

    FV is very reliable and transparent and the first thing I turn on on a new Mac.
     
  3. Avenged110 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2010
    #3
    I realize now FileVault doesn't really have anything to do with Mavericks not receiving security updates anymore, but I like it because it takes care of encryption for me. As you mentioned having sensitive data in an encrypted DMG, using FileVault saves me the trouble of having to manage this myself as everything is encrypted automatically, and it stops anyone messing with my computer by way of resetting the admin password (which is not difficult). I've never had any trouble with it, although if you are using a hard drive and/or a CPU without the AES instruction set on it, FV will impact performance. Coupled with a firmware password, it can make a stolen MacBook fairly useless (even though a firmware password can be reset by Apple).
     
  4. JohnDS macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2015
    #4
    FileVault will also protect all your cached passwords which would be otherwise available if someone stole your Mac.
     

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