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Mozilla has released Firefox 95, featuring a new version of its security sandboxing subsystem called RLBox, and additional performance and efficiency improvements for the macOS version of the web browser.

mozilla-firefox-banner-fixed.jpg

According to the release notes, RLBox is a new technology that hardens Firefox against potential security vulnerabilities in third-party libraries.

The sandbox subsystem works by compiling a process in WebAssembly before re-converting it into native code, which restricts its access to system memory and stops it from jumping to unexpected parts of the program, thus limiting its potential for exploiting vulnerabilities.

As Mozilla's Bobby Holley explains:
This technique, which uses WebAssembly to isolate potentially-buggy code, builds on the prototype we shipped last year to Mac and Linux users. Now, we're bringing that technology to all supported Firefox platforms (desktop and mobile), and isolating five different modules: Graphite, Hunspell, Ogg, Expat and Woff2.

Going forward, we can treat these modules as untrusted code, and — assuming we did it right — even a zero-day vulnerability in any of them should pose no threat to Firefox. Accordingly, we’ve updated our bug bounty program to pay researchers for bypassing the sandbox even without a vulnerability in the isolated library.
In other improvements, Firefox 95 reduces CPU usage on macOS during event processing, and reduces the power usage of software decoded video on macOS, especially in fullscreen. This includes streaming sites such as Netflix and Amazon Prime Video.

This version also provides faster content process startup and improves page load performance by speculatively compiling JavaScript ahead of time.

Meanwhile, it's now possible to move the Picture-in-Picture toggle button to the opposite side of the video. Users can find the new context menu option Move Picture-in-Picture Toggle to Left (Right) Side.

Lastly, Mozilla says that Site Isolation is now enabled for all Firefox 95 users to better protect them against side-channel attacks such as Spectre.

Firefox 95 for macOS is available now from the Mozilla website.

Article Link: Firefox 95 Brings Security, Performance, and Efficiency Improvements to Mac
 
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44267547

Cancelled
Jul 12, 2016
37,643
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FF is still a great browser and use this along with Brave and Safari - triple threat
Even after all the mockery with Firefox over the years, I still really enjoy using this browser. It’s always been in need of performance upgrades, so it will be interesting to see what ‘95’ can do, especially given it is a bit sluggish compared to Safari.
 

chucker23n1

macrumors 604
Dec 7, 2014
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FIREFOX 95 sounds so beautifully retro.

I dig the splash screen, too.

1639136025837.png


(For real, though, I still think incrementing your major version number every six weeks without consideration of whether your changes are actually major is bad. I can never tell what the current version of Firefox or Chrome or Edge is, nor can I tell when the last time they made major changes was. But I can with Safari, because their version numbers make sense.)
 

star-affinity

macrumors 68000
Nov 14, 2007
1,812
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I use Firefox as my main browser at home – Chrome at work because of the ability to have separate profiles and switch between them.

My only gripe with Firefox is that it still does pop-up menus in the truncated ”Windows style”.
It's been suggested to Mozilla to do something about this.

The language picker menu on Wikipedia with Firefox to left and how it looks in Safari and Chrome on the right:

Firefox.png Safari and Chrome.png
 

boss.king

macrumors 603
Apr 8, 2009
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For real, though, I still think incrementing your major version number every six weeks without consideration of whether your changes are actually major is bad. I can never tell what the current version of Firefox or Chrome or Edge is, nor can I tell when the last time they made major changes was. But I can with Safari, because their version numbers make sense.
Do you need to tell what the latest version is though? I couldn’t tell you what the latest version of Safari is, but if I need to know I could quickly look it up, and the same applies to Firefox and co.
 

chucker23n1

macrumors 604
Dec 7, 2014
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Do you need to tell what the latest version is though? I couldn’t tell you what the latest version of Safari is, but if I need to know I could quickly look it up, and the same applies to Firefox and co.

I don't read "what has changed?" news about my web browser or dozens of other pieces of software every six weeks. And almost always, the answer is "nothing I care about" anyway.

I do, however, follow "what's new in Safari 15?", because 1) the cycle is slow enough for that to be practical (once a year), and 2) there's usually one or two interesting things in there.

If Firefox had a release like Firefox 2022 in a few months, and they had gathered up a few major features for the launch, I would be far more inclined to care.
 

amartinez1660

macrumors 65816
Sep 22, 2014
1,420
1,402
This new version is especially fast. On my M1 mac it even overtakes Safari to be the fastest on speedometer 2.0.
Oh, I don’t know why I didn’t think of using Firefox instead of Chrome for an issue I was having. Trying Firefox for the first time ever now.

——
I use the company’s outlook mail and a couple other tabs work stuff on a web browser when at home. Started opening those on a Chrome instance because for some reason Safari started logging me out from the account every 20mins on the clock… CPU usage of only those 3 tabs in a single window and the amount of processes/memory running is unwarranted not to mention the uneasiness of anything google permanently running.
 

kdekorte

macrumors member
Nov 11, 2016
61
43
When wil Firefox be able to use my iCloud bookmarks. The is literally the main thing from having me switch to it on my personal machine. On my work machine I use it all the time. As a web developer I prefer the Firefox debuting tools and occasionally I find issues that the people using Chrome don't see, although that is getting less and less.
 

boss.king

macrumors 603
Apr 8, 2009
5,443
4,820
I don't read "what has changed?" news about my web browser or dozens of other pieces of software every six weeks. And almost always, the answer is "nothing I care about" anyway.

I do, however, follow "what's new in Safari 15?", because 1) the cycle is slow enough for that to be practical (once a year), and 2) there's usually one or two interesting things in there.

If Firefox had a release like Firefox 2022 in a few months, and they had gathered up a few major features for the launch, I would be far more inclined to care.
The difference there is that Firefox gets way more updates per year while Apple remains locked in the annual release cycle (for better or worse). It’s easier to do Safari updates that way because, frankly, less gets updated.

I do think Firefox might need to overhaul its versioning, but I’m not convinced Apple’s approach would work here.
 
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chucker23n1

macrumors 604
Dec 7, 2014
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The difference there is that Firefox gets way more updates per year while Apple remains locked in the annual release cycle (for better or worse). It’s easier to do Safari updates that way because, frankly, less gets updated.

I'd much rather have fewer and bigger updates.

 
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