Firewall in leopard show firefox blocked, but it's working...

Discussion in 'macOS' started by yetanotherdave, May 15, 2008.

  1. yetanotherdave macrumors 68000

    yetanotherdave

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2007
    Location:
    Bristol, England
    #1
    I just had a look at my firewall settings, all the programs I would expect have "allow" set for incoming connections..
    Except Firefox. it's blocked. Except that it's my main browser at the moment, I'm using it to post this!
    I've heard reports of leopard's firewall being next to useless, but if something is set to block, and it allows connections, it's not only useless, that's boldly marching into the dangerous territory.
    Am I misunderstanding this, or is this just broken.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. kolax macrumors G3

    kolax

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    #2
    I don't even have Firefox on my list, and it loaded up and worked and didn't even ask permission.
     
  3. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    #3
    Im not sure if "incoming connections" really means what you thought it meant.
     
  4. kolax macrumors G3

    kolax

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    #4
    I would have thought it would mean any incoming data going to that application would be blocked.
     
  5. yetanotherdave thread starter macrumors 68000

    yetanotherdave

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2007
    Location:
    Bristol, England
    #5
    If it doesn't mean that, it's badly mislabelled, in my opinion.
     
  6. Arnel macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2003
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #6
    It means that it has blocked any incoming connections, but it doesn't mean incoming data. When you browse the internet, your computer makes a connection to the web server, and then data is transferred back and forth along that connection. It's like you ringing a friend, and then the two of you talking back and forth during the phone call.

    When the Firewall says that incoming connections to Firefox are blocked, it means that Firefox can't accept any incoming connection requests from the outside, which hopefully stops malware trying to pry its way onto your machine.
     
  7. Matek macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    #7
    Everything is working perfectly well, it's just the way Arnel explained it. Since a connection has a well established meaning in the networking world, I doubt this thing is badly mislabeled.
     
  8. Sherman Homan macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    #8
    Arnel is exactly right, but since you aren't running a web server you don't have to block it in your firewall. There is nothing to block.
     
  9. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    #9
    that might be the case, in my experience with windows firewalls and others such as zonealerm, its always blocking "outgoing request" by default.

    I guess OSX "firewall" is a different idea, maybe it should use another term just to avoid confusing users.
     
  10. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    #10
    Huh? Firewalls are generally used to block unsolicited incoming requests based on the configuration. If they blocked outgoing by default, you wouldn't be able to do anything network related.

    I think you meant to compare default-deny vs. default-allow strategies, which is different.
     
  11. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    #11
    you would, they just present a message for you to allow the app to use internet.

    Its a common practice in most windows firewall apps.

    Also Im not sure if your definition is accurate and up to date.
     
  12. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    #12
    It's not a definition, it's the typical usage. Enlighten me to your definition.
     
  13. yetanotherdave thread starter macrumors 68000

    yetanotherdave

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2007
    Location:
    Bristol, England
    #13
    Right, so in this context, incoming connection stops data transferred initiated from outside sources?

    When I say its confusing, I have worked in an IT infrastructure job for about 4 years now, so generally know what I'm talking about, and the meaning of this is not obvious to me.
     
  14. bplein macrumors 6502

    bplein

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, TX USA
    #14
    It refers to IP connections (TCP, UDP for example). Connection has a very specific definition. Going back to a previous post, I will repeat: Firefox opens a connection to macrumors, not the other way around. Data will flow both directions on the connection, but the firewall in this case is only set up to block INCOMING connections, and in the case of Firefox, there is no incoming connection under normal use.

    Let's assume for a minute that someone gave you a bogus trojan Firefox. You could be using it, and the bad guy could try and open a connection inbound to your faux-Fox. That would be blocked by the firewall.
     
  15. yetanotherdave thread starter macrumors 68000

    yetanotherdave

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2007
    Location:
    Bristol, England
    #15
    Yeah, it makes sense now, but it's not realy a typical apple user friendly way of putting it.
     

Share This Page