First Mac Mini, Late 2014...which model?

Discussion in 'Mac mini' started by jennyferzoo, Nov 27, 2014.

  1. jennyferzoo, Nov 27, 2014
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2014

    jennyferzoo macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2012
    #1
    Hi guys, browsed the forum before making this thread but none were pertaining to what I would use the Mini for (similar questions but different uses). I actually want to purchase Mac Minis to replace our current laptops and act as media PCs; not using XBMC but just full screening flash/html5 browser streaming on websites like DramaFever and YouTube. Storing pictures and videos from the digital camera. Maybe a few flash based games here and there, checking email. We will be hooking these up to LED tvs in our bedrooms.

    I originally was going to purchase the base model @ $499 but figured that I would need some future proofing or at least some power if I may potentially be streaming HD video daily or at least multitask in the future with new OS'. So I thought I would set my new budget to the $699 model. The only problem is I feel that is a little too overboard. So now I am stuck between the $499 which is perfect for my needs now and may start to boggle and already may be obsolete to certain software or paying $200 for a machine I will not fully take advantage of. Am I underestimating the power of the 1.4ghz 4gb? Or should I go with the $699?

    TLDR: Buying Base 2014 4gb Ram to stream Netflix/Youtube through a browser 24/7. Will it suffice or should I bump up to the $699 model?
     
  2. Meister Suspended

    Meister

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2013
    #2
    For what you are doing the base mini works perfectly fine.
    "Future proofing" is nonsense, since noone knows what the future will bring.
     
  3. brand macrumors 601

    brand

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Location:
    127.0.0.1
    #3
    As the saying goes, Death and Taxes. :p
     
  4. Meister Suspended

    Meister

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2013
    #4
    There are developments ahead that will be gamechangers.
    Of course spec changes and higher demands are certain, but that does not mean that buying the highest specs will give your mac a longer life. Buy what you need now and let the future worry about itself.
     
  5. P00t macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2012
    Location:
    Nottingham UK
    #5
    Yosemite runs terrible with 4GB, they could of at least added 8GB to the Base 2014.

    That said, at least SSD saves the day.
     
  6. Meister Suspended

    Meister

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2013
    #6
    Do you have any documentation of this?
    I run three macs with 8gb, 4gb, 4gb and all run Yosemite. I see no difference to mavericks. If all Yosemite is snappier.
     
  7. tuc macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    #7
    I'm not sure how well Yosemite runs with 4GB RAM, but the thing with the base model Mini is that it's impossible to add more RAM later. So I lean toward the $699 model for most people. It comes with 8GB RAM and the processor is almost twice as fast, so it's a better value than a base with BTO 8GB RAM option.

    I'm not sure what you're saying about SSDs, though. Neither the base model nor the $699 model comes with an SSD.
     
  8. Micky Do macrumors 68000

    Micky Do

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2012
    Location:
    An island in the Andaman Sea.
    #8
    Good to see the "future-proofing" myth challenged.

    Time was that getting the highest specced computer you could afford, and being able to upgrade components did allow for running newer software as it came along. Nowadays it is more a generational thing.

    Sure, better specs will give better performance for some apps, especially more demanding ones. For someone doing a lot of video editing, audio production, design work or whatever, higher specs will be beneficial. However, for most day to day use for the average Joe or Jill, they are unlikely to make much difference in use.

    Better to choose a computer, and specs, that fit current / anticipated needs, rather than dreams or desire for bragging rights to performance that is not really required.
     
  9. redheeler macrumors 603

    redheeler

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2014
    #9
    "Future proofing" means a different thing depending on what the computer's uses are. For instance, if I had bought a big mean Power Mac G4 in 2000 just to write documents with, I could still be doing that on it today with ease.

    The same goes if I had bought this big mean Retina iMac just to check email, browse the web, and listen to music. I could still be using it five years from now, no upgrade required.
     
  10. richfromroch macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2011
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    #10
    Well, let's see what you get for your 200 bucks:

    2.6GHZ processor vs. 1.4GHZ. Speed really does count regardless of what task your are engaging in.

    1TB hard drive vs. 500GB. Who doesn't need more storage at some point?

    8GB of memory vs. 4GB. Do you know what you'll be using this computer for in two or three years? Regardless, 8 is better than 4. I always regarded a memory upgrade as a "just in case" investment.

    Lastly, there are the graphics processors: Intel Iris Graphics vs. Intel HD 5000. Both are from the same vintage (2012 or so), but the Iris has a slightly higher performance rating.

    It you add it all up, and you have 200 additional bucks, you're getting a better deal in my book. Then again, it's not my 200 bucks.

    If you think you'll be keeping the new Mini for just a couple of years, then the entry-level model will do just fine. However, I still have a G4 iBook (2004) and an old dual-core iMac (2006) hanging around. They both work, and I still use the iMac for my HAM radio hobby. But since they were entry level, eventually they hit the upgrade wall as far as the Apple OS goes.

    Rich
    Rochester, NY
     
  11. scottsjack macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Location:
    Arizona
    #11
    To not take Rich's advice would be completely insane. There would come a time when you would be lamenting, "for a lousy two-hundred bucks, for a lousy two-hundred bucks."
     
  12. jennyferzoo thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2012
    #12
    Thank you for all of the advice guys. As far AppleCare prices, do you guys notice any trends of the prices throughout the year? I am debating if I should purchase it now (holiday season) or later on when the 1-year is almost up. B&H has it for $69 atm.
     
  13. richfromroch macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2011
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    #13
    I generally only purchase Applecare for my portables (i.e. MacBook Air), but $69 sounds like a good deal for Applecare.

    Rich
    Rochester, NY
     

Share This Page