First the Bold and now the Thunder?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by megfilmworks, May 15, 2008.

  1. megfilmworks macrumors 68020

    megfilmworks

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  2. Bosox3 macrumors regular

    Bosox3

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    #2

    Isnt this how everything in the world is though? Same deal w/ the battle of the video game systems.
    Everyone wants to make $$, so these companies need to step up and put out a device that the people want/need.
     
  3. megfilmworks thread starter macrumors 68020

    megfilmworks

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    #3
    I agree.
    It's just such a pitiful attempt. And it won't even be available until the 3Q. And "Thunder"? Wow. It seems they have a real dearth of R&D talent at RIM, not to mention a lack of marketing savvy.
     
  4. impact_blue macrumors regular

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    #4
    It's not the name, it's how it works. Why does it bother you much anyways? Competition is good and drives prices down. Not everyone in the world prefers Apples products for whatever reason so RIM is trying to pick up these customers and along with it's core of business geared clientele.
     
  5. Van Wildonher macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    So what if they want to try to cut into apple's iPhone share. It only means apple will make better iPhones/software for better prices or get left in the dust. Good news if you ask me.
     
  6. Xjett macrumors member

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    #6
    RIM probably doesn't care. They are adding a touchscreen because thats what their users want. Honestly, saying this as a Blackberry user who went to the iPhone, RIM has the business angle down packed and continued to do so while Apple slowly added features to the iPhone. Business users see the fact that the iPhone is slowly adopting features that their phones already do and it kind of turns them off a bit. I had an iPhone since day one and I found myself missing a whole load of features that the Blackberry had. I just love Apple and am extremely patient. Who knows, maybe 2.0 will changes things. But I think Windows Mobile and Palm will be feeling it a lot more than RIM.
     
  7. justanothernerd, May 15, 2008
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2012
  8. seenett macrumors regular

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    #8
    RIM has been making smartphones for years. They have LOTS of models available with many phone companies. They typically introduce several models a year. I believe the Pearl, 8800, and Curve all arrived within 12 months of each other (and that's just AT&T's versions).

    I'm certainly not putting down the iphone, but as of today they have one model available with one carrier. They have momentum, but not every move RIM (or Nokia or LG etc.) makes is a reaction to what Apple does.
     
  9. neven macrumors 6502a

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    #9
    You're forgetting that marketing can hugely influence product development. That's one of the key philosophies at Apple - "T-shirt-first design". Imagine what the ad will look like, then do the product based on that.

    Of course, you still need awesome engineers to make your ideas a reality and to surprise you with what you didn't think was possible.

    Marketing doesn't necessarily mean figuring out how to cram your truly lame product down your customers' throats. It also means understanding what the market needs, wants, and will be surprised and delighted by.
     
  10. megfilmworks thread starter macrumors 68020

    megfilmworks

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    #10
    Some good points.
    Just two comments:

    We will see where RIM is a year from now.
    And thanks RIM for the best laugh of today.
     
  11. t0mat0 macrumors 603

    t0mat0

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    #11
    Care to give some examples? Of thinking about an advert 1st, then making a product??

    They might have design contraints (thickness of 1 inch for a laptop, or size and weight contraints for the iPhone), but surely they counterbalance that view with their other philosophies? I'm thinking they come also more from we want to make a ..., how best to do it? approach.
     
  12. impact_blue macrumors regular

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    #12
    Again what do you have against RIM? I :rolleyes: at your Fanboyism.
     
  13. Telp macrumors 68040

    Telp

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    #13
    Didn't they say the reason RIM would stay number 1 is the textile keypad?
     
  14. Michael CM1 macrumors 603

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    #14
    You're probably quite right about Windows Mobile and Palm getting hit harder than RIM. I still don't think any of them get why some of us prefer the iPhone (hello, iPod!) but keep trying their own thing. I just don't think anybody will suck up much of the "I want an audio/video player in my smart phone" segment anytime soon. But RIM has a pretty good grip on the market right now.
     
  15. drchipinski macrumors 6502

    drchipinski

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    #15
  16. Xjett macrumors member

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    #16
    I prefer the iPhone because the interface is intuative and amazing and it's an Apple product. However I switched cause I didn't need the enterprise features.
     
  17. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #17
    Tactile keyboard. It's about touch, not cloth. Thanks.

    RIM will stay where they are because businesses trust it, and have invested heavily in infrastructures for it, and because it has Java... meaning developers are easy to find.

    Even though RIM has had about one spectacular outage a year, that pales in comparison to ATTs ridiculous almost-every-weekend downtime of iPhone activation servers.
     
  18. megfilmworks thread starter macrumors 68020

    megfilmworks

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    #18
    Then I guess we both had a good laugh.
    What do I have against RIM? I have owned several of the inelegant bricks.
    And though I respect Kdarling's opinion, I think the growing consensus in enterprise is the RIM server's are a useless middle man in the future of business use.
     
  19. aristobrat macrumors G5

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    #19
    I personally don't consider the scope of the two to be comparable.

    As the guy that runs a small BlackBerry Enterprise Server where he works (only about 250 devices), the amount of chaos *any* RIM outage creates for some of the people I support is simply amazing. Typically, every BB customer in North America is affected. Tens of millions. The scale is incredible.

    An activation server being down is inconvenient for the people trying to activate at that moment, and I do agree with you that AT&T has way more iPhone activation server downtime than RIM has major outages, but the scales on which each affect customers aren't even close.
     
  20. Xjett macrumors member

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    #20
    Exactly, it's not like people are constantly activating their iPhones. The Blackberry outages make people go into a complete panic. However, I'll take one day of insanity for every 364 of reliability when it comes to RIM.
     
  21. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #21
    Yes, sorry I was in a hurry.

    It's not so much the scale, as the intent. RIM's intent at least, is to be up 24/7.

    ATT and Apple clearly have no such intention. Whether you're activating for the first time, or reactivating because you had to do a restore, it's just ridiculous for any phone company related server to deliberately be down for a whole weekend.

    RIM's last outage was for about three hours. To some that's a long time to be without email, yes. The places I work for have tens of thousands of Blackberry users, but we use our own apps and servers to send critical info.

    Apple also expects corporations to host their apps on a secret backlot of the iTunes store on an Apple server. As I've said before, this might work with small businesses, but large corporations can't accept the security risk and/or loss of control.
     
  22. SFStateStudent macrumors 604

    SFStateStudent

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    #22
    HaaaHaaaaa! First, the Bold and now the Thunder! What happened to the Lightening? So, what's going to show up first "the egg" or "the chicken?" I'm surprised Nokia hasn't joined the fray! :D:p
     
  23. 11800506 macrumors 65816

    11800506

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    #23
    Just to let you know, that picture of the Thunder is a mock-up (I think made by BGR) and is purely speculation. It doesn't reflect necessarily what it will end up looking like.
     
  24. aristobrat macrumors G5

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    #24
    You know, I haven't seen the specifics on how Apple's going to do this, so who knows.

    However, since iTunes has been able to deliver secure content that Apple neither hosts nor controls the access to (like the Rush Limbaugh and Coast to Coast AM podcasts, available only to paying customers), I don't find it completely out the question that Apple could come up with an iPhone app delivery system agreeable to some large corporations. (i.e. the large corporation hosts the apps themselves and controls the access to it)
     

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  25. Surely Guest

    Surely

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    #25
    Competition is good. It is what drives companies like Apple. It forces them, and other companies, to think outside of the box and create the products we all love.

    I hope that this new RIM product works well and forces Apple to yet again think up something new and exciting.

    Apple seems to thrive as the underdog.
     

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