For all looking... Here is a easy way to wake a sleeping mac!


smithrh

macrumors 68020
Feb 28, 2009
2,464
834
Remote access... through ARD or similar.

Not a ton of people doing it, but that doesn't mean it's not useful. Certainly keeps the target mac energy efficient until needed.
 

Partron22

macrumors 68020
Apr 13, 2011
2,497
711
Yes
Where's the value in waking up a sleeping computer if you're not even near it? :confused:
So you can log into it with VNC from your iPad and check how the Mac's getting along in whatever task you've set it to.
Remoter VNC works nicely for this. There are many other such Apps as well.
 

RMXO

macrumors 6502a
Sep 1, 2009
873
41
Since I don't have any iOS devices, any VNC software can do this right?
 

Partron22

macrumors 68020
Apr 13, 2011
2,497
711
Yes
Since I don't have any iOS devices, any VNC software can do this right?
Yes, or at least those whose developers make at least a little effort to be Mac compatible. I've logged into Mac from my Nexus 7 using AndroidVNCViewer. Mouse clicking, and command key support is flakey, but a) it's liveable and b)there's several other vnc apps out there If that's not good enough to meet your needs.
 

talmy

macrumors 601
Oct 26, 2009
4,705
266
Oregon
Wake On LAN requires sending a "magic packet" to the computer to wake it. Just using VNC (for instance) won't do that, you need software that can send the packet. However in Snow Leopard and later there is the BonJour Sleep Proxy feature in which a Time Capsule or Airport base station (of suitably recent vintage) will respond to BonJour requests for the sleeping Mac and send the magic packet to the Mac to wake it.

Waking a machine remotely (outside the LAN) can be difficult. I just leave my home server system running 24/7 to avoid the issue. I'd expect that as long as there is such a system running and supplying a VPN service, it would be possible to wake other systems with programs that send the "magic packet" by first connecting to the LAN via VPN. However this won't work with BonJour Sleep Proxy because BonJour protocol doesn't go through the VPN. Yazsoft ShareTool would probably do the job, but I haven't tried it.
 
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PicnicTutorials

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Dec 29, 2013
544
12
Where's the value in waking up a sleeping computer if you're not even near it? :confused:
The same app can be used for WOL over internet it just requires more added pieces to the equation.

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Basically you have to do some port forwarding. Specifically port 9. However I have not found the tut/combo that works with my limited knowledge with this. When I find a thread or tut that puts the steps in plain English and not in book form I will post here.
 

talmy

macrumors 601
Oct 26, 2009
4,705
266
Oregon
Basically you have to do some port forwarding. Specifically port 9. However I have not found the tut/combo that works with my limited knowledge with this. When I find a thread or tut that puts the steps in plain English and not in book form I will post here.
That would just be the beginning. Not much point in waking the system if you can't access it. You really need either a server computer to supply VPN or a router than has a built-in VPN service. Yazsoft ShareTool is a nice alternative because it works like a VPN but passes BonJour so you also get good file and printer sharing, but it also requires a running (not sleeping) local computer.

And if you don't have a static IP, you also need a DDNS service.

Frankly, it's all a PITA unless you will be using it frequently.
 

PicnicTutorials

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Dec 29, 2013
544
12
That would just be the beginning. Not much point in waking the system if you can't access it. You really need either a server computer to supply VPN or a router than has a built-in VPN service. Yazsoft ShareTool is a nice alternative because it works like a VPN but passes BonJour so you also get good file and printer sharing, but it also requires a running (not sleeping) local computer.

And if you don't have a static IP, you also need a DDNS service.

Frankly, it's all a PITA unless you will be using it frequently.
Ya teamviwer or remotix to access it. My ip doesn't change that often. Only seems to change after rebooting the router. So in theory I could just use it and change it every so often instead of messing with the ddns. As far as I know in order to wake it from outside your network you need 3 pieces put together. MAC address, IP address, and forward port 9. But there is obviously more to the puzzle because I can't get it working.
 

talmy

macrumors 601
Oct 26, 2009
4,705
266
Oregon
There is a possibility the port is blocked by your ISP. Use something like ShieldsUp! (a free Internet service, not an application) to check out if port 9 is being forwarded.
 

mcrum23

macrumors member
May 6, 2013
66
0
There is a simpler trick tough: you can use iOS Remote to wake up your mac provided you are on the same wifi network, all you need to do is to start the app and... that's it.
 

PicnicTutorials

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Dec 29, 2013
544
12
There is a simpler trick tough: you can use iOS Remote to wake up your mac provided you are on the same wifi network, all you need to do is to start the app and... that's it.
The fing app is basically the same. Once enabled all you do is open the app and click wake on LAN. There is a WakeUp app as well I have that gives the option to wak on LAN or wake internet. But again can't get the internet one going.

The disconnect here I believe is that there are hundreds of different routers and each have there own way of doing things. So there is no one size tut fits all. I reached out to Remotix app guys and told them if they show me how to set this up (remote access and wake basically follow the same principals) I would trade them for a steller review. Regardless it's a steller app though. Even armed with their step by step instructions aimed at my particular router setup I still couldn't get it going. It's like a phone number I'm afraid. To many combinations of things that need to be put together in the correct order. I am still hopefull I will eventually find someone to hold my hand and walk through it all though. I know those persons exist. Unfortunatly with these type of things those people are often too smart to communicate the procedure in lamens terms so ultimately it falls on deff ears.
 
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PicnicTutorials

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Dec 29, 2013
544
12
This guy spells it out pretty well in a youtube vid. http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=lWodv1Kq08A I will attempt to follow along tomorrow morn. Looks like a no brainer. My only problem is that my router port forwarding settings look nothing like his. So there will be a few trial and errors needed.
 

talmy

macrumors 601
Oct 26, 2009
4,705
266
Oregon
according to this http://support-remote.splashtop.com/entries/514305-How-do-I-connect-to-my-computer-if-it-is-in-sleep-or-hibernate-mode-Wake-on-LAN- and a few other places I found it says that in order to wake on LAN the computer needs to be connected to the router with a cable. not wifi. That doesn't make full sense to me though because why would it work in network through wifi (FYI not cable connected).
The network adapter must be powered up for Wake-on-LAN to work. WiFi always completely powers down when the computer is sleeping while the Ethernet port stays active.
 

PicnicTutorials

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Dec 29, 2013
544
12
The network adapter must be powered up for Wake-on-LAN to work. WiFi always completely powers down when the computer is sleeping while the Ethernet port stays active.
Oh the wifi in the computer powers down not the router. Ok so there is truth to this. In which case this explains some things because my computer is wifi connected. I could cable connect though. Why does wake on LAN work within my network though even though it's wifi connected?
 

talmy

macrumors 601
Oct 26, 2009
4,705
266
Oregon
Oh the wifi in the computer powers down not the router. Ok so there is truth to this. In which case this explains some things because my computer is wifi connected. I could cable connect though. Why does wake on LAN work within my network though even though it's wifi connected?
I could be wrong -- it sounds like your WiFi card is powered when sleeping. Maybe when you turn on Wake-on-LAN it will keep it powered? Doesn't seem good for battery powered computers.