Format Differences Between iMovie & Final Cut

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by IvanB, Sep 15, 2009.

  1. IvanB macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2009
    Location:
    California
    #1
    I'm new to Final Cut (Have the first version installed now) and I noticed I couldn't import most of my audio tracks that I previously used in iMovie due to format change.

    What are the consistent formats that work with Final Cut? As I noticed it will let me import certain .mp4 tracks but not all of them and I don't know why that is? :confused:

    Also I have a lot of video footage captured in 1080i wide screen in iMovie, but I can't fit 90minutes of HD footage onto one single sided DVD. Is there a way for me to still burn this using iMovie and iDVD without having to import into Final Cut and do a conversion? It seems like iMovie 6 is so much quicker for simple one track editing, as you don't have to render it after every little change....though I appreciate the more advanced capabilities offered by Final Cut for more advanced editing.

    Thanks
    Ivan
     
  2. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #2
    Audio should be 16bit, 48k AIFF files.

    AIC, ProRes, DVCPro HD, HDV, etc., are examples of HD codecs to use w/FCP.

    Are you trying to make an SD-DVD that's playable on a TV, or are you trying to make a data DVD?

    You have your FCP project setup incorrectly. Going through the tutorials that came w/FCP won't take long and will make getting comfortable w/the program much easier.


    Lethal
     
  3. IvanB thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2009
    Location:
    California
    #3
    Thanks for the input Leathal.

    Yes although the original format was captured as 1080i HD, I don't have a way to burn to blue ray so I will need to burn about 90 minutes to a SD dvd. Any suggestions?

    So it sounds like your saying there is a way to import original footage into the FC and be able to watch it without rendering it? If that's the case great, I'll do more reading.

    Thanks again.
     
  4. CaptainChunk macrumors 68020

    CaptainChunk

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #4
    FCP has been based on Quicktime since it's inception and as long as you're feeding it compatible video codecs in QT .mov containers (like the ones Lethal mentioned), all should be well.

    By first version of FCP, I'm hoping you don't mean FCP 1.0 (which is 10 years old) and perhaps Final Cut Studio 1.0 (which is FCP5/Compressor 2/Motion 2/DVDSP4). FCP 1.0 doesn't support HD codecs...at all.

    If you have Final Cut Studio 1.0, you can use Compressor to encode your HD video to DVD MPEG-2 video (there are several quality presets and you can make custom ones, too) and Dolby 2.0 audio. Those two files (.m2v for video and .ac3 for audio) can then be brought into DVDSP to author a DVD.

    In a pinch, DVDSP also has its own DVD video encoder if you must bring Quicktime files directly into it, but it isn't as customizable as using Compressor to encode the video first.
     

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