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PinkyMacGodess

macrumors 604
Original poster
Mar 7, 2007
7,909
4,084
Midwest America.
I came across this from Wired's online magazine. At first I loved it, ordered one, but it's too small, and cancelled...

It's 59" wide, but only about 27.5" deep, which includes the flip up cable organization panel. My current desk is 90" wide, and 35" deep, which is large, but I've gotten used to it (IOW: My stuff has spread to cover the current horizontal surface. It's also near critical mass!).

But would this appeal to anyone? Should I rethink using it and dump the aircraft carrier I currently use. (It's an old full-on office Steelcase executive desk I got for $100 about 25 years ago. And it's built like a tank! The desk top is 1.5" thick!) It (the metal desk) has a lot of cool features, like the magnetic desk pad, and the ability to use magnetic cable holders, and the flip up cable organizer, etc.

I guess I'm trying to talk myself back into it, but am wondering if I can live with that much of a change. (Like where do I put all that 'stuff') And would the magnets be a problem.

Full disclosure: I don't work for, represent, or have ever ordered anything from them before, and am just trying to figure out if there is an angle I haven't thought of to talk myself back into getting this. It has 'minimalism' going for it. This current desk would probably survive a thermonuclear war!

I think the cost of this new desk isn't that much out of line with other desks, although I haven't done much research to be honest.

What do other people use for desks?
 

eyoungren

macrumors Penryn
Aug 31, 2011
24,095
18,126
ten-zero-eleven-zero-zero by zero-two
I came across this from Wired's online magazine. At first I loved it, ordered one, but it's too small, and cancelled...

It's 59" wide, but only about 27.5" deep, which includes the flip up cable organization panel. My current desk is 90" wide, and 35" deep, which is large, but I've gotten used to it (IOW: My stuff has spread to cover the current horizontal surface. It's also near critical mass!).

But would this appeal to anyone? Should I rethink using it and dump the aircraft carrier I currently use. (It's an old full-on office Steelcase executive desk I got for $100 about 25 years ago. And it's built like a tank! The desk top is 1.5" thick!) It (the metal desk) has a lot of cool features, like the magnetic desk pad, and the ability to use magnetic cable holders, and the flip up cable organizer, etc.

I guess I'm trying to talk myself back into it, but am wondering if I can live with that much of a change. (Like where do I put all that 'stuff') And would the magnets be a problem.

Full disclosure: I don't work for, represent, or have ever ordered anything from them before, and am just trying to figure out if there is an angle I haven't thought of to talk myself back into getting this. It has 'minimalism' going for it. This current desk would probably survive a thermonuclear war!

I think the cost of this new desk isn't that much out of line with other desks, although I haven't done much research to be honest.

What do other people use for desks?
I couldn't find anything that had the dimensions I wanted without costing over a bazillion dollars or being custom made. So I went to America Furniture Warehouse and found a dining room table.



78w x 40d x 30h

I did not need the chairs so did not order them. I'd stick with your desk if I had one that wide.
 
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danpass

macrumors 68030
Jun 27, 2009
2,559
264
Glory
I was so disgusted with the desk offerings of today with their heinous, shallow, front to back dimension that puts the monitor right in your face, that I ended up just building my own lol.

48” wide by 30” deep (front to back)

One inch plywood doubled up for a nice thick top then a simple three wall support
 
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PinkyMacGodess

macrumors 604
Original poster
Mar 7, 2007
7,909
4,084
Midwest America.
I couldn't find anything that had the dimensions I wanted without costing over a bazillion dollars or being custom made. So I went to America Furniture Warehouse and found a dining room table.



78w x 40d x 30h

I did not need the chairs so did not order them. I'd stick with your desk if I had one that wide.

Interesting solution. I am one that hates legs on desks. I keep knocking then with my own legs. I did have a thought of laying claim to the current dining table that the wife complains about, and that would force (coerce?) her to get a new one. It's huge, but only has 4 legs at the corners, which is what I found appealing about the metal desk. If that metal one were only 'huger'... :cool:
 
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eyoungren

macrumors Penryn
Aug 31, 2011
24,095
18,126
ten-zero-eleven-zero-zero by zero-two
Interesting solution. I am one that hates legs on desks. I keep knocking then with my own legs. I did have a thought of laying claim to the current dining table that the wife complains about, and that would force (coerce?) her to get a new one. It's huge, but only has 4 legs at the corners, which is what I found appealing about the metal desk. If that metal one were only 'huger'... :cool:
Yeah, I only had the thought because there was a small amount of time where I was working in the kitchen with my work supplied Mac. I like the results so this table is going to be here for a while.

I don't like legs either so the trick is to find a table that doesn't use those as a 'feature'. If you go with a more expensive table you might be able to get a 'leaf' insert (our real dining room table has one) to make the table even wider.

This solution works for me so far and I'm probably going to stick with it.
 

PinkyMacGodess

macrumors 604
Original poster
Mar 7, 2007
7,909
4,084
Midwest America.
Yeah, I only had the thought because there was a small amount of time where I was working in the kitchen with my work supplied Mac. I like the results so this table is going to be here for a while.

I don't like legs either so the trick is to find a table that doesn't use those as a 'feature'. If you go with a more expensive table you might be able to get a 'leaf' insert (our real dining room table has one) to make the table even wider.

This solution works for me so far and I'm probably going to stick with it.

It's not that legs 'look bad', they just tend to be hard and often have sharp edges, and human legs don't.

I almost bought a 'computer desk' at a 'big box office supply store', but nixed the idea after looking at the thin metal rods that laced underneath. I thought they were decoration, but they actually held the damn thing square, and were quite a mess underneath. If you weren't rolled into the desk straight on, you had a rod or two impeding your leg. It had a glass top surface too, meaning desk pad, or no optical mouse without frosting the glass somehow. *shrug*

Yours does look like the legs are far enough away to allow for good access. And desk height is so all over the place. Oh, and finding 'real wood' is damn near impossible, sadly. And particle board, aside from off-gassing, really isn't very durable for me as I'm rough on my toys. :D:cool:
 
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rhett7660

macrumors G5
Jan 9, 2008
12,758
2,737
Sunny, Southern California
If you don't mind a little cutting... I purchased the island countertop from Ikea and cut it to the size I wanted. I have two of the drawer units and three legs attached to it and it is sturdy as all get out and it is deep. Two cuts and done.
 

PinkyMacGodess

macrumors 604
Original poster
Mar 7, 2007
7,909
4,084
Midwest America.
If you don't mind a little cutting... I purchased the island countertop from Ikea and cut it to the size I wanted. I have two of the drawer units and three legs attached to it and it is sturdy as all get out and it is deep. Two cuts and done.

That makes me sad... Three years ago I was gutting a family member's house after they passed, and found a solid real wood butcher block table top, nearly 6 feet long, and at least 3 feet wide, inch thick as I remember it. It was heavy, and the mess from a primo horder, we were throwing out 99.972% of everything we touched, and it got tossed. I *almost* went back to get it. I feel so stupid for tossing it. It had cheesy cheap wire legs on it, and needed a good sanding, but other than that, was probably infinitely salvageable. But we pitched so much crap. We filled three full size half height containers. The memory of it almost brings me into PTSD. Yikes... Oh well, it's long gone now... But what could ahve been. They don't make wood like that anymore...

EDIT: Surreal experience. I found a glue trap with a snake stuck in it that had a mouse in it's mouth. Both long since dead. It was all horrific...
 
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rhett7660

macrumors G5
Jan 9, 2008
12,758
2,737
Sunny, Southern California
That makes me sad... Three years ago I was gutting a family member's house after they passed, and found a solid real wood butcher block table top, nearly 6 feet long, and at least 3 feet wide, inch thick as I remember it. It was heavy, and the mess from a primo horder, we were throwing out 99.972% of everything we touched, and it got tossed. I *almost* went back to get it. I feel so stupid for tossing it. It had cheesy cheap wire legs on it, and needed a good sanding, but other than that, was probably infinitely salvageable. But we pitched so much crap. We filled three full size half height containers. The memory of it almost brings me into PTSD. Yikes... Oh well, it's long gone now... But what could ahve been. They don't make wood like that anymore...

EDIT: Surreal experience. I found a glue trap with a snake stuck in it that had a mouse in it's mouth. Both long since dead. It was all horrific...

And real butcher block pieces are not cheap... Not super expensive, but not cheap! Oh man. We looked at getting one from one of the local wood places.
 

sgtaylor5

Contributor
Aug 6, 2017
407
213
Cheney, WA, USA
IMG_0329.jpeg


My desk is built like a tank out of a small 5x2' 3/4" sheet of plywood and 2x4's. 2 shelves and closet shelf brackets held up by a thrift store bookcase. Chair I received as payment for work done for a client.
 
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eyoungren

macrumors Penryn
Aug 31, 2011
24,095
18,126
ten-zero-eleven-zero-zero by zero-two
That makes me sad... Three years ago I was gutting a family member's house after they passed, and found a solid real wood butcher block table top, nearly 6 feet long, and at least 3 feet wide, inch thick as I remember it. It was heavy, and the mess from a primo horder, we were throwing out 99.972% of everything we touched, and it got tossed. I *almost* went back to get it. I feel so stupid for tossing it. It had cheesy cheap wire legs on it, and needed a good sanding, but other than that, was probably infinitely salvageable. But we pitched so much crap. We filled three full size half height containers. The memory of it almost brings me into PTSD. Yikes... Oh well, it's long gone now... But what could ahve been. They don't make wood like that anymore...
My uncle died some time in 1998. Actually a great, great uncle, he built the house he died in some time in the 1930s or 40s I believe. Carpenter by trade he was known for being able to drive nails in one strike.

We inherited a few of his quality pieces. One is a coffee table that was in his living room. It has geometric shapes on it that HIS father laid in to the top. We also have the dining set my uncle got some time in the 1950s. This is real solid wood and the table is our main dining table.

I'm glad we were able to grab stuff when my mom was cleaning out his house. When she goes we will end up with some of the stuff she kept from him too.

My uncle only bought (and made) quality stuff.
 
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romanof

macrumors regular
Jun 13, 2020
179
108
Texas
I found a long butcher block plank in my local Home Depot, then purchased a pair of the short cubical bookcases from Walmart to hold it up at both ends and are almost as long as the plank is wide. It made a table that is not bad looking, has a ton of desktop space, lots of legroom, and the addition of eight more cubby holes for stuff. (A little inconvenient, since they are sideways and I have to duck down to access them, but for seldom used items, fine). In addition, the ersatz plank-table is so strong it can be stood on without the slightest possible of collapse. And long enough to hold 4 Apple Pro Displays side by side and a printer at the end. (If you know anyone who could use such, or has the money to buy them - not me.)

Vastly superior to the overpriced imported junk in Office Depot.
 
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